Progarchives, the progressive rock ultimate discography

FINCH

Symphonic Prog • Netherlands


From Progarchives.com, the ultimate progressive rock music website

Finch picture
Finch biography
Founded in The Hague, Netherlands in 1974 - Disbanded in 1978

The foundation of Dutch progrock band FINCH was laid by bass player Peter Vink and drummer Beer Klaasse (both ex-Q65 and The KJOE). They were eager to play progressive music: Peter was impressed by the symphonic rock of YES and BEER by the improvised rock of MAHAVISHNU ORCHESTRA and CREAM. After some sessions and failed efforts to find a good singer, the new band switched to instrumental music with this line-up: Peter Vink, Beer Klaasse, the 19 year old "guitar virtuoso" Joop van Nimwegen and keyboard player Paul Vink. With two Vink's in the band the name became FINCH, the English translation from this Dutch name. The EMI sub-label Negram was willing to invest in the new progrock band, in '75 this resulted in the debut-album "Glory of the Inner Force" (worldwide sold 20.000 copies). New keyboard player Cleem Determeijer's interplay with guitarist Joop sounded captivating and the first album was hailed by the music press. The single "Colossus" ('75) wasn't successful but it's now a hugh collector's item. In '76 the second album "Beyond Expression" was released, it was acclaimed as Album of the week by radio and tv broadcasting company Veronica and known music magazines were very positive. The future looked bright for FINCH: sold oud concerts, worldwide sales (15.000 copies) and in Japan FINCH became almost as popular as other Dutch progrock bands FOCUS and EARTH & FIRE! Unfortunately Cleem was no longer able to combine the music with his classical study, he was replaced by Ad Wammes and, due to musical disagreement, Hans Borsboom replaced Beer Klaasse. This new FINCH line-up released the third album entitled "Galleons of Passion" in '77, it was not received very well though the sales flagged around the 11.000 copies. It turned out to be the band's swansong until in '99 the Dutch record company Pseudonym Records released a 2-CD, including fine demos of the "Galleons of Passion" album and exciting live material from '76.

The first LP "Glory of the Inner Force" contains four melodic and often swinging compositions with strong echoes from YES. The keyboards sound tasteful (Hammond organ and Mellotron), the guitarwork is great with passionate solos and the rhythm-section plays solid (a grunting Rickenbacker bass). The second album "Beyond Expression" sound more original, inventive and dynamic with furious guitarplay and bombastic keyboards in four captivating and compelling tracks. A splendid album, a bit underrated because of the attention for the other Dutch progrock bands EARTH & FIRE, KAYAK and FOCUS. The third album "Galleons of Passion" is more in the vein of mid-GENESIS and sound pleasant but less captivating and contrasting. The 2-CD "The Making of...Galleons of passion/Stage" '76" is mainly interesting because of the live-material: it's layered with magnificent electric guitarplay (Jan Akkerman once told he was very impressed by Joop!) and great solos from Ad's newly purchased Minimoog synthesizer. The live-CD contains the previously unreleased track "Necronomicon" (over 15 minutes), a 'typically Seventies live progrock composition' with lots of solos on guitar, keyboards and bass.

: : : Erik Neuteboom, The NETHERLANDS: : :
Fan & official Prog Archives collaborator

FINCH Videos (YouTube and more)


Showing only random 3 | Search and add more videos to FINCH

Buy FINCH Music


FINCH discography


Ordered by release date | Showing ratings (top albums) | Help Progarchives.com to complete the discography and add albums

FINCH top albums (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

4.14 | 203 ratings
Glory Of The Inner Force
1975
4.08 | 158 ratings
Beyond Expression
1976
3.44 | 100 ratings
Galleons Of Passion
1977

FINCH Live Albums (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

FINCH Videos (DVD, Blu-ray, VHS etc)

FINCH Boxset & Compilations (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

4.37 | 25 ratings
The Making Of... Galleons Of Passion / Stage '76
1999
4.00 | 8 ratings
Vita Dominica
2012
4.58 | 12 ratings
Mythology
2013

FINCH Official Singles, EPs, Fan Club & Promo (CD, EP/LP, MC, Digital Media Download)

4.14 | 7 ratings
Colossus
1975

FINCH Reviews


Showing last 10 reviews only
 The Making Of... Galleons Of Passion / Stage '76 by FINCH album cover Boxset/Compilation, 1999
4.37 | 25 ratings

BUY
The Making Of... Galleons Of Passion / Stage '76
Finch Symphonic Prog

Review by sgtpepper

4 stars I have only the live part of the album as I already had the "Galleons of passion" studio version. The live concert is full of power, some improvisation and confirms the band's ability to replicate the focused studio efforts into a rawer stage outcome. Thankfully we can hear selections from the both first studio albums and the masterpiece "A passion condensed" in its entirety. There is a new piece called "Necronomicon" which is fine but does not match the released studio tracks. While the material is outstanding in general, playing is sometimes over the top and the sound is relatively mediocre. There I rate it with 4 stars.
 Galleons Of Passion by FINCH album cover Studio Album, 1977
3.44 | 100 ratings

BUY
Galleons Of Passion
Finch Symphonic Prog

Review by sgtpepper

4 stars Finch not only changed two members of their line-up (keyboards and drums) prior to this release. They also decided to change their sound significantly, or let's say the way they played. The band has softened, mellowed, became more reflective. They are only two-three spots where they really unpack it and sometimes, the guitar is the only fierce instrument (hear the gorgeous solo in the first track).

Compositions are still strong albeit simpler and catchier. The album opens on a bland note but soon transfers into a romantic guitar-driven scenery that makes up for a bit of waiting. The second track is the only weak one on the album IMO. It has a more jam feeling, especially in the second part where the rhythm section takes the lead, it reminds me a bit of mid-70's Focus flirting with jazz ("Crackers"). Fortunately we are graced with two excellent romantic instrumentals. In particular, the first one "As one" is a prime example of well constructed reflective piece. Pity this track isn't longer. "With love as the motive" is the richest track, also the longest one. Perfect Moog/ARP symphonic lines, emotional guitar solo and a peaceful outro make it perhaps a strongest track on the album. "Reconciling" is a bit of return to the previous two albums although it doesn't exceed them in any way. It's interesting to hear the funky groove understated by the guitar too.

Overall, this album isn't at the level of "Beyond expression" and "Glory of the inner force" but it is a memorable good-bye by this one-of-a-kind band.

 Beyond Expression by FINCH album cover Studio Album, 1976
4.08 | 158 ratings

BUY
Beyond Expression
Finch Symphonic Prog

Review by sgtpepper

5 stars The peak album by the fierce Dutch band. They softened minimally but brought better compositional skills. All three tracks on the album are memorable, have clear development and structure. In particular, the first 20-minute is a masterpiece of progressive rock with tons of notes, emotions and instrumental prowess. The guitar solo that starts after the 10-minute mark is one of my favourite guitar solos ever merging the best of progressive/blues influences.

The second piece is notable for including fast fusion tracks with all four players speeding at 100km/hour. The third track is the most symphonic track on this album with great synth layers and emotional guitar playing. The melancholy end of the track is the best ending possible to this album.

This masterpiece belongs to the best instrumental progressive rock works ever and is a proud testament of the mid 70's progressive rock peak that was both mature, well executed and emotional. A must have in any instrumental rock collection due to incredible piece of musicianship.

 Glory Of The Inner Force by FINCH album cover Studio Album, 1975
4.14 | 203 ratings

BUY
Glory Of The Inner Force
Finch Symphonic Prog

Review by sgtpepper

5 stars What a debut album by Finch! If you were getting tired or bored of the post-1974 Focus output and their masterful "Hamburger Concerto" than you had an option to board a faster Dutch train, then it would be Finch.

Finch were a group of four instrumental virtuosos but the main attraction was the young guitar player Joop van Nimwegen seconded by a universal keyboard master Cleem Determeijer.

This record contains the rawest and most classically oriented Finch playing. Often, the speed of playing and dynamics are astonishing while not getting over the edge. The guitar sound is quite sharp and fits well into edgier rock. "Register magister" has a lot of interesting style trips in it be it symphonic rock or rock'n'roll, whereas "Paradoxical moods" is closer to the conventional first 70's rock sound with Hammond etc.. "Pisces" is the most symphonic number with great organ and guitar soloing that would be repeated on the next album. This one reminds me of Focus. "A bridge to Alice" does not stand as high as the previous 3 tracks but it has the typical Finch/Focus emotional end that these bands mastered brilliantly. The short "Colosus" tracks are short virtuoso pieces with trademark Shadow-inspired soloing. They are great to serve as band's introduction. This and the next one, more refined "Beyond expression" are among the peak of European instrumental prog rock of the 70's. 4.5 stars

 Beyond Expression by FINCH album cover Studio Album, 1976
4.08 | 158 ratings

BUY
Beyond Expression
Finch Symphonic Prog

Review by BrufordFreak
Collaborator

4 stars Using a JAN AKKERMAN-like guitar tone, this Dutch band plays a music that makes me think of contemporary bands like CAMEL, YES, and even ELP more than FOCUS. As a matter of fact, I think if you took Caravan-Camel keyboard player, Jan Schelhaas, and put him with Starcastle's rhythm section and Andy Latimer (playing Jan Akkerman's guitar) you'd have a better look at the music on this album--and what GREAT music it is! Blues rock with great melodies and an electric guitarist worthy of checking out (Joop Van Nimwegen). Still, the FOCUS similarities and influences are doubtless.

1. "A Passion Condensed" (20:05) (9/10 overall): - a) Part 1 (1:04) the most obvious FOCUS reference opens the album. (9/10) - b) Part 2 (4:15) a fast-paced exercise in CAMEL-CARAVAN fusion. (9/10) - c) Part 3 (2:55) the music smooths out and even takes on a bit of a bluesy flash with strumming guitars, bouncing Fender and Hammond and slashy riffs from the guitar to glue it all together. Nice finish. (9/10) - d) Part 4 (2:59) slowing things way down with electric guitar arpeggi, the Wurlitzer takes over allowing the guitar to then take the lead--providing a nicely emotional and melodic song. (8.5/10) - e) Part 5 (5:47) jumps out of the prettiness of the previous section with a near-Led Zeppelin raunchiness. Great drama in the base and rhythm while the lead screams and soars in his Jimmy Page-like bluesy-ness. But then, suddenly, it falls back into the dreamy syrupy-ness of the previous section while the guitar lead slowly recedes. And then, crash! Boom! Bang! The guitar leaps back into the fore and a very impressive JAN AKKERMAN-like solo ensues --complete with speed, accuracy, and melody! (9/10) - f) Part 6 (3:05) segueing from the previous section with some very quick staccato hits, the song almost heads into "Hocus Pocus" territory with some unusual synth and guitar sounds chosen to carry the melody. But then for the final minute and a half searing guitar and sizzling synth exchange machine gun lead riffs dueling between repetitions of the main theme. Nice way to finish! (10/10)

2. "Scars On The Ego" (8:51) (9.25/10 overall): - a) Part 1 (2:21) opens with a riff straight out of Todd Rundgren's UTOPIA before switching to a "Black Mariah" sound and structure. Interesting! (9/10) - b) Part 2 (6:30) a slow key- and guitar- arppeggi-based opening serves to establish a foundation for a very nice if simple Wurlitzer melody line. I like the effected bass?it's like something I've heard from Percy Jones before. The "chorus" has a CAMEL sound and feel to it, but then the second verse opens with some searing STEVE HILLAGE-like guitar. Back to the Black Mariah theme before changing tempo and letting a heavily effected and high speed TODD RUNDGREN like guitar solo preempts a disco-like section over which a cheezy synth solos. Blistering Rundgren guitar precedes a totally UTOPIAn close. (9.5/10)

3. "Beyond The Bizarre" (14:24) (8.5/10 overall): - a) Part 1 (2:58) slow, heavy guitar arpeggio with piano accompaniment opens this Russian-sounding dirge. In the second minute the music fills out the soundscape in a very FOCUS-like rich bluesy emotionality. (8.5/10) - b) Part 2 (2:57) the pace quickens and a nice rhythm section backs the speed-soli of the guitar and keyboard. Again, the melodies are so catchy! (9/10) - c) Part 3 (2:59) the piano in this opening section sounds like the slow section of Derek and the Dominoes' "Layla" (part 2), but then a bouncy four chord piano section ensues for the screechy guitar to lay down a simple, melodic lead. Switch to swirling organ for the background before shifting to the final section. (8/10) - d) Part 4 (5:30) long, drawn out, pause-filled keyboard play teases the listener with its emotional melody before we switch to piano arpeggi and strumming acoustic guitar (to emphasize the previous "Layla, Part 2" theme while also mirroring the ending to FOCUS songs like "Focus II" and "Moving Waves" and "Birth"). (8.5/10)

Some great music in the vein of fellow countrymen FOCUS and especially with the guitar sounds and stylings of JAN AKKERMAN in mind. Whether a tribute or mimic or not, this is very good instrumental music with very good instrumentalists and great theme melodies.

4.5 stars; a near-masterpiece of progressive rock music.

 Beyond Expression by FINCH album cover Studio Album, 1976
4.08 | 158 ratings

BUY
Beyond Expression
Finch Symphonic Prog

Review by maryes

5 stars Finch's second album "Beyond Expression", as I already say in my review about the first "The Glory of Inner Force" is a must in any prog collection , specially in instrumental music terms. In this album they brings again the same symphonic/jazz prog mix ! The first track "A Passion Condenser" is a clear example, the music starts with with a very brief symphonic overture ( a "eruption" overture) and soon the jazzy and groovy main theme takes the scenery, a "easy" but strong "riff", the second part comes with a hammond-organ solo followed by a meditative phased guitar/electric piano melody and an almost "crying" guitar solo and a symphonic passage in the same mood of "overture theme ( in fact seems like a readaptation) , in the third part a moog/guitar duo is the absolute detach and at last returns the main theme... simply fantastic ! In the second track "Scars on the Ego" starts with a hard rock theme and closes with a moog/guitar duel, but the highlight go to distorted bass guitar solo (starting 3 min 57 sec ). The third track " Beyond the Bizarre" sounds like a farewell with a middle section martial theme and a rock- ballad conclusion. The musicians are perfect and creative, and the album flows easily !!! My rate is 5 stars !!!
 Glory Of The Inner Force by FINCH album cover Studio Album, 1975
4.14 | 203 ratings

BUY
Glory Of The Inner Force
Finch Symphonic Prog

Review by maryes

5 stars I think with certain tranquility, which this first album of FINCH "The Glory of Inner Force" (as also the second album "Beyond The Expression" figures between the top progressive instrumental list of prog rock albums in all times, IMHO this albums rivals with another gems like RETURN TO FOREVER "The Romantic Warior" or GRYPHOM "Red Queen to Gryphon Three". They produces a symphonic prog music mixed with jazz with a great virtuosity ! All for musicians are highly qualified... but I detach Joop Van Nimwegen and his Ackermann/Howe style and Peter Vink clearly influenced by Squire. Vink's style is easily comparable with Squire .... is enough listen in track 3 "Pisces" a solo passage starting 7 min 36 secds ! Nimwegen style also is easily identified in trac 1 " Register Magister" by the "mellow" guitar phrase starting 1 min 57 sec an Ackermann allusion and in the final passage guitar solo starting 7 min 46 sec a Howe invocation. The album don't have any weak points and "hang out" you breath in countless moments. One and probably most fantastic moments is guitar/bass duet in track 4 "A Bridge To Alice" starting 4 min 39 sec until 5 min 33 sec, simply outstanding. Obiviously my rate is 5 Stars !!!
 Galleons Of Passion by FINCH album cover Studio Album, 1977
3.44 | 100 ratings

BUY
Galleons Of Passion
Finch Symphonic Prog

Review by Aussie-Byrd-Brother
Special Collaborator Honorary Collaborator

3 stars Seventies Dutch band Finch's first two works `Glory of the Inner Force' and `Beyond Expression' were full of ravishing instrumental runs and frenetic energy, but for their third and final album in 1977, the group delivered their most purely symphonic work in `Galleons of Passion', more often in the dreamy and romantic style of groups like Camel, Focus and Rousseau and the spacey keyboard sound of bands such as Eloy. It may sometimes lack the overall power and finesse of the two discs before it (although there's still welcome traces of it throughout), but its lush and tasteful instrumental pieces are very easy to simply relax with and enjoy.

Opener `Unspoken is the Word' is instantly recognisable as the band from the previous albums, just a bit more mellow and subdued. Humming spacey drones and whirring keyboards softly rise, electric guitars fire majestic symphonic themes in the manner of Focus, plodding drums carefully lift the tempo and bass purrs gently, with a dreamy middle that lifts in victory in the finale being particularly heart-warming. The first half of `Remembering the Future' has a darker edge with gutsier churning guitars and Eloy-like synths groaning with drama, oddly reminding ever so slightly of parts of Pink Floyd's `The Wall' that would arrive a few years later! But the second section abruptly moves into racing jazz/fusion-like burst with buoyant bass soloing that, despite sounding cool, seems completely at odds with the first half. `As One' then closes the first side with a precious Andy Latimar-like guitar and synth rumination that Camel fans will adore, and the way it builds in excitement and slow-burn pay-off is masterful.

`With Love as the Motive' is the perfect title for three part suite that opens the second side, and the piece holds several beautiful themes that reprise sweetly throughout that would have fit perfectly on many Camel albums. Initially bristling with danger from deep-space synths and fleeting wilder guitar splinters, it soon morphs into a grand and regal symphonic motif full of embracing romance and grandeur. Album closer `Reconciling' is lively and full of confidence, a smorgasbord of first-rate busy soloing from all the players. It's a supremely upbeat track full of zest and spirit, with plenty of exploding fiery guitar embers, delicious electric piano and Hammond organ sprints and even some cool funky breaks, and the constantly repeating spiralling Moog-runs are playful and very addictive! It's a truly upbeat closer that will leave listeners with a smile on their face, and it's the perfect composition for Finch to close out their career on.

There's no denying that parts of `Galleons of Passion' sound a little directionless and drained, perhaps with a subtle sense of a group `running on empty', especially when compared to the endlessly energetic previous two albums that had such a momentum and excitement. But the LP still holds a respectful dignity with perfectly lovely playing, and there's something refreshing about a group that released three strong and consistent albums (in the space of only three years!) and got out before the rot of disco, punk and AOR popularity of the time distilled their music in any way. It means their entire discography can stand proud, and it's a perfectly satisfying end to this talented group.

Three stars.

 Beyond Expression by FINCH album cover Studio Album, 1976
4.08 | 158 ratings

BUY
Beyond Expression
Finch Symphonic Prog

Review by Tarcisio Moura
Prog Reviewer

4 stars I was quite surprised by this album. I remember listening to it some time ago and getting the feeling of just another instrumental jazz rock album by a band that was obviously influenced by Mahavishnu Orchestra. Upon listening to Beyond Expression recently I feel that I was unfair and did not pay very much attention to a very good prog band. Yes, the music here is more akin to jazz rock/ fusion than to symphonic prog, but still there are enough elements of the latter to make a big difference to the flurry of faceless fusion acts that seem to sprung from everywhere during the 70s. There also some heavy explicit blues moments too. But, being dutch, the fine melodies are not absent either. And after repeated spins I found this album to be more pleasant, creative and original than I originally thought it was.

As one expects the musicianship of the band members is simply astonishing. Joop Van Nimwegen is a tremendous skillful and creative guitarist that leads the music in here. His style is close to fellow countryman Jan Akkermann, although obviously less classical influenced. His playing is very technical and precise. The remaining members are not far behind him, but just like Mahavishnu orchestra, this is clearly a guitar led band. What surprised me the most is the variety of styles they played, the mood swings and the melodic approach, something not very usual for the jazz rock acts in general. So I guess, they are indeed a symphonic prog band after all, only with a heavy leaning towards fusion.

Rating: 4 strong stars. Very fine Instrumental album by a terrific, underrated, band. Guess Ill have to look for their other works. Holland rules!

 Glory Of The Inner Force by FINCH album cover Studio Album, 1975
4.14 | 203 ratings

BUY
Glory Of The Inner Force
Finch Symphonic Prog

Review by Groucho Barks

4 stars Of course there is a back story! In Manchester there used to be this cavernous cellar of a record store named Yanks, later to change its name to Power Cut. It was extant from around 1975 to about 2000. The name Yanks came from the fact that they seemed to import loads of stuff from the USA that I assumed had reached 'cut out bin' status. The sleeves were the heavy US card and all the albums had the import cut off or puncture in the corner...ie sleeve clipped off or hole punched through. They sometimes had different sleeves to the Euro/UK release too. The best thing about them was the price! Again, assuming they were bought as massive job lots to save from the incinerator, Yanks used to knock them out at ?£0.99, ?£1.49 or ?£1.99...at a time when new albums were ?£5-?£6...like I cared some of these were 2 or 3 years old...then considered a lifetime in the faster moving pop/rock market!!So of course it was easy to buy 6 albums for your ?£6 and take a punt...although most long haired/prog stuff would hit the mark to varying degrees! Finally we get to Finch! I totally had no idea who they were but liked the idea of four 10 min plus tracks and the cover suggestion that this was my kinda stuff! And at 0.99 how could you go wrong. I still have this and the import puncture in the top right corner! And near 40 years later this still gets a regular turn! I discovered they were Dutch and prog come latelies...maybe the record companies in 75-77 wanted some of the Focus action...but probably already in retreat from the new wave.....which made this gem all the more precious! Glory Of The Inner Force was their first of 3 albums (have to admit to not owning the other 2) and it compares to one of my other all time favs from 1975, Chocolate Kings by PFM. Not necessarily stylistically but in the long term impression it left. Eschewing such fripperies as vocals, the band concentrated on what they did best. Extended compositions, dexterous musicianship, using as many time signatures as 10 mins would allow and being better than the sum total of whatever influences they came from or displayed. The opening Register Magister starts with a very strong guitar/keys entwined riff that suggests Genesis and King Crimson and then hits its stride...admittedly an ever changing one...with a definite hint of fusion and more melodic passages perhaps closer to say Be Bop Deluxe than any direct prog references. I can hear similarities to Druid and in this track and definitely throughout the album, parts that if someone said it was from a Mars Volta cd you wouldn't be at all surprised. Paradoxical Moods has something of a Streetwalkers vibe and for sure they had listened to (earlier)Yes and is highlighted by a keys heavy section that could have been Uriah Heep at their best. Yes, the guitarist has his Jan Akkerman moments (Focus inevitably) but hell, that's no bad thing! Pisces is a very angular track and I can hear a touch of Return To Forever in there. A Bridge to Alice is the most ambitious. Definitely a King Crimson sound and one that veers towards an eastern scale then a gorgeous Focus (baroque) meets Allan Holdsworth acoustic interlude before a touch of VDGG menace takes the song forward with a side order of Kansas and The Enid thrown in. Overall, the keys and near poppy (but thankfully short) melodic/catchy passages don't work for me....am guessing this is what gets them the symphonic prog tag....but as a treasured punt that worked big time it would be a near 4.5 stars but losing the half for the too jarring symphonic sections....! May your unexpected discoveries give you as many years of repeated plays...
Thanks to ProgLucky for the artist addition. and to Quinino for the last updates

Copyright Prog Archives, All rights reserved. | Legal Notice | Privacy Policy | Advertise | RSS + syndications

Other sites in the MAC network: JazzMusicArchives.com — jazz music reviews and archives | MetalMusicArchives.com — metal music reviews and archives

Donate monthly and keep PA fast-loading and ad-free forever.