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WOBBLER

Symphonic Prog • Norway


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Wobbler biography
Founded in Hønefoss, Norway in 1999

The line-up consists of Lars Fredrik Froislie (of WHITE WILLOW) on keyboards, Kristian Karl Hultgren on bass guitar, Martin Nordrum Kneppen on drums, Morten Andreas Eriksen on electric and acoustic guitars and mandolin and Tony Johannessen on vocals. This group is strongly evocative of KING CRIMSON, GENESIS, GENTLE GIANT along with newer symphonic prog bands like ANGLAGARD and ANEKDOTEN with a dash of Scandinavian folk and classical influences thrown into the mix.

Their debut CD WOBBLER "Hinterland" contains long and complex tracks featuring lush, vintage keyboard sounds, making extensive use of Mellotron, Mini-Moog, Hammond C-3 and harpsichord, along with beautiful electric and acoustic guitar playing, a complex rhythm section along with flutes, recorder, saxophones, mandolins and various other instruments providing a very full, symphonic sound.

Highly recommended for fans of the early progressive greats and symphonic prog music.

: : : TheProgtologist, USA : : :

⭐ Collaborators Top Prog Album of 2017 ⭐

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Buy WOBBLER Music


From Silence To SomewhereFrom Silence To Somewhere
Karisma 2017
$19.78
$28.98 (used)
Rites at DawnRites at Dawn
Termo Records 2014
$12.94
$10.34 (used)
AfterglowAfterglow
Termo Records 2014
$12.94
$11.96 (used)
HinterlandHinterland
Termo Records 2018
$12.93
$16.74 (used)
HinterlandHinterland
CD-ROM
THE LASER'S EDGE 2017
$49.99
$24.00 (used)

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WOBBLER discography


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WOBBLER top albums (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

3.83 | 352 ratings
Hinterland
2005
3.81 | 289 ratings
Afterglow
2009
3.98 | 486 ratings
Rites At Dawn
2011
4.42 | 591 ratings
From Silence To Somewhere
2017

WOBBLER Live Albums (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

WOBBLER Videos (DVD, Blu-ray, VHS etc)

WOBBLER Boxset & Compilations (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

WOBBLER Official Singles, EPs, Fan Club & Promo (CD, EP/LP, MC, Digital Media Download)

4.00 | 4 ratings
Imperial Winter White Dwarf / Leprechaun Behind the Door
2003
4.50 | 4 ratings
Lá Bealtaine
2011
4.29 | 7 ratings
This Past Presence
2011

WOBBLER Reviews


Showing last 10 reviews only
 Rites At Dawn by WOBBLER album cover Studio Album, 2011
3.98 | 486 ratings

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Rites At Dawn
Wobbler Symphonic Prog

Review by dougmcauliffe

4 stars Rites at Dawn is an album that I can't point to any real big flaw other than that its not as good as "From Silence to Somewhere." It is at the very least, a big improvement over the two that preceded it. My issue with the first two are that there are no songs, just several ideas played consecutively for long amounts of time, an issue I also have with much of Anglagards discography. This is no longer an issue on Rites at Dawn as the band nails down a better song structure for most of the songs revisiting and reprising ideas that may have appeared earlier in the songs. Overall the production is much better than past releases and this album is a lot brighter sounding than FSTS.

We have out ambient openers and closers Lucid and Lucid Dreams which I don't think improve the album any but they're fine.

The real music starts with La Beatltaine. The opening strongly reminds me of The Runaway by Gentle Giant but the songs got a nice groove. Right away you can see the band is playing much tighter than they did on previous releases. They also have new vocalist Andreas joining for this release. His voice makes me think of a mix of Jon Anderson and Derek Shulman with a Norwegian accent, I really like it. Enough with the comparisons. The song goes through a handful of nice movements led by the guitar and keyboards, not the best track on the album but it starts things off well. 7.5/10

What follows is in my opinion the best song on the album, In Orbit. An acoustic guitar fades in as the band eases into a nice jam. At 2:20 the 'verse' kicks in and too put it shortly, its amazing. The bass is really prominent with a nice hard hitting tone while the keys during this section aid in making a real intense atmosphere. There's lots of beautiful sections throughout the songs 12 minute run time and they're all really led by the keys. In the final 2 minutes we are given a soaring climax where it revisits the 'verse' from the beginning. Also worth noting is the very fine vocal performance throughout the track. 9/10

This Past Presence is more of a foresty (is that a word?) symphonic track. Similar to what their contemporaries Jordsjo would be doing a couple years later. After a nice folky intro, the band explodes back in with what I consider the signature Wobbler sound with a similar groove to La Beatltaine. In the final minute and a half the band erupts into a mellotron doused climax which kind of reminds me of part of the climax from From Silence to Somewhere. An overall pretty nice track. 7/10

A Faeries Play opens with fierce jam with each member going ham on their respective instruments. Even through some of the quieter sections of the song, this intensity and darkness can be felt throughout. This song also shows the bands greater emphasis on good melodies. 8/10

We close with The River, the second best song on the album. This is the most hammond-heavy track as well, being honest, I probably prefer a heavy hammond tone to the mellotron speaking personally. This is probably the most 'epic' sounding track and has a great energy throughout. Once again the melodies, particularly the vocal melodies, are really fantastic and its truly a symphonic prog treat. A worthy closer. 8.5/10

Though nothing on here is quite as good as anything off From Silence to Somewhere (In my opinion), Rites at Dawn is a very solid release and one I revisit frequently. I've seen others say they bleed too much influence on this album, but I hear Wobbler before I hear Yes or Gentle Giant. I wont deny the influence is certainly there, but they're far from bleeding 'too much' influence. The music is generally full of life and energy that I cant help but love.

4 Stars

 From Silence To Somewhere by WOBBLER album cover Studio Album, 2017
4.42 | 591 ratings

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From Silence To Somewhere
Wobbler Symphonic Prog

Review by Wicket
Prog Reviewer

4 stars I say it again: I was wrong.

I'm not ashamed to admit when I'm wrong, but I'm man enough to admit when I make a mistake. And I made a mistake on Wobbler.

I used to bash on their earlier albums for sounding disjointed and unoriginal, and while I have corrected myself and edited my prior reviews to be less biased and more respectable, I still never cared much for them. So, of course, by re-reviewng their previous works, I had to of course listen to their latest record, one which all the masses adore. Naturally, I rolled my eyes.

But I was wrong.

"From Silence To Somewhere" is without a doubt Wobbler's most polished, original and complete album yet. Just the mammoth title track alone shows a rhythm and pattern in chorus and composition and, of course, an instrumental bridge with a good few minutes for solos and instrumental display, my favorite aspect of this band. There's some flute for color, string synths for flavor and rock organ for good measure. Only downside I have is that I wished the track would be just a couple minutes shorter since there are a couple of "empty spaces" of sonic atmosphere that feels like something should be happening there but isn't.

After a beautiful but again utterly pointless piano interlude, "Fermented Hours" kicks me awake. Is this the same Wobbler I've been bashing the whole time? Here it's frantic, a bit of King Crimson-esque schizophrenia. Sure, there are some softer lilting waltz-like sections in between, but the whole song still feels like it hangs on a knife edge; one new element or melody could send the band hurtling back towards an instrumental brawl. The band's technicality and musical prowess truly shine on this song, but the best part is that the composing finally factored the vocals into the equation. Unlike "Imperial Winter White" off of "Afterglow", there's purpose in the vocals here. There's cooperation between vocals and instruments and one ins't stepping on the others toes. It's a truly wonderful thing.

"Foxlight" begins softly, but eventually builds into another crowdpleaser. The instruments shine and solo , the vocals have their place and time at the right moments, and there's more of that medieval times-esque sound I liked from their previous albums. Sure 46 minutes is a decent length for an album, but still feels a bit short compared to some mammoth prog albums out there. Nevertheless, Wobbler finally managed to push me over the edge and join the dark side. This is the band's most polished effort yet and hopefully they've coalesced on an original sound going forward.

If I had a gripe, and I usually do, because I don't have nice things, it may be the fact that they're completely ditched the Yes playbook and instead thrown in a couple of plays Xeroxed from the King Crimson playbook (hey, that's not necessarily a bad thing, but there's a difference between influenced by and and copying. I feel this album is influenced by King Crimson, whereas "Rites at Dawn" was completely written with the intention of sounding like a Yes record).

Having said that, this is an impressive album showcasing everything that Wobbler is capable of, and that makes me feel good. Bitterness at previous albums subsided, I eagerly await the next Wobbler release with renewed hope and optimism.

 From Silence To Somewhere by WOBBLER album cover Studio Album, 2017
4.42 | 591 ratings

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From Silence To Somewhere
Wobbler Symphonic Prog

Review by emisan

5 stars I've never heard about Wobbler until From Silence To Somewhere, but after I've listened this album and I've studied other bands albums (Hinterland, Afterglow and Rites At Down), I can say that Wobbler is one of my favourite prog bands ever. The first three album are very good (especially Afterglow ) but From Silence To Somewhere is a masterpiece. The band's music is heavily rooted in 70's symphonic prog rock using old vintage instruments and at the first play it reminds me of Hybris, Anglagard's first album. The album structure is very similar with classic prog albums. It contains four tracks with the second "Rendered In Shades Of Green" serving as a two minute intermission between the long opener and the two 10+ minutes final tracks. All songs are pure gold, containing many dark and intense passages and melancholic parts, pastoral interludes, medieval atmosphere, all combined in the grandeur of symphonic prog. From Silence To Somewhere is without a doubt Wobbler's most polished, original, complete and near perfect album yet and maybe the best prog album of the last five years. Highy recomended!! 5 stars.
 Hinterland by WOBBLER album cover Studio Album, 2005
3.83 | 352 ratings

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Hinterland
Wobbler Symphonic Prog

Review by Zoltanxvamos

5 stars A favourite of mine for a long time, this band is unbelievably unique and on the more angular side of progressive rock. What an interesting band, with technically good players all round. This album takes the elements of many older progressive rock bands, such as Genesis, Gentle Giant and King Crimson. They also take some elements of newer prog bands such as Anglag'rd but with a little less of an angular, angry and dark feel. This album is in their 2 best albums and I cannot wait to see how the new album will turn out. Wobbler is an ever changing band that still takes elements of old Progressive Rock. Now, here is the thing... this album is not a masterpiece, but it is worthy of 5 stars. Wobbler is in the best modern progressive rock bands of this century so far. I (again) cannot wait for the new album!
 Hinterland by WOBBLER album cover Studio Album, 2005
3.83 | 352 ratings

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Hinterland
Wobbler Symphonic Prog

Review by siLLy puPPy
Collaborator PSIKE, JR/F/Canterbury & Eclectic Teams

4 stars WOBBLER got its start in 1999 in the frosty northern lands near Hønefass, Norway in the midst of the Scandinavian black metal scene's height of popularity but somehow found itself catching the prog rock bug instead. The band not only decidedly took the route of the musical complexities delivered by the highest expressions of rock music but found the most inspiration in the classic era with particular stylistic input from the bigwigs of the era such as King Crimson, Yes, Museo Rosenbach, PFM, ELP and many more. Instead of rushing into creating an album that would come off as amateurish, the band took its sweet time to carefully craft its reverie of musical style into something that would respectfully emulate the retro prog of the golden era and opted for several years of touring before finally taking the plunge of releasing an album.

Also during this time keyboardist Lars Fredrik Frøislie amassed an impressive collection of vintage keys which included the much needed mellotron, a hammond organ, minimoog, rhodes clarinet, ARP, a real piano and of course a harpsichord. By 2005 the band had crafted enough original material and began to play certain snippets at prog festivals and local gigs with the debut album HINTERLAND following soon after. This band set out to create retro prog and didn't leave any classic stones unturned when seeking an authentic retro sound on HINTERLAND which included ONLY vintage instrumentation around in the 1969-75 timeline. The result was one of the most authentically sounding retro prog bands to have emerged since the prog revival exploded onto the scene in the 90s.

WOBBLER didn't settle for second best crossover prog with cute cuddly melodies with a few prog accouterments. This band went for the jugular by amassing an hour's worth of 70s prog pomp basically spread out into 3 lengthy tracks leaving only a short less than a minute opener providing a fourth track. HINTERLAND delivered the lengthy intricate complexities of classic Yes and Genesis symphonic prog strewn out into long meandering tracks but also along for the ride were Keith Emerson keyboard virtuosic workouts, touches of quirky playfulness in the vein of Gentle Giant and a Scandinavian infusion of prog folk courtesy of flutes, recorders and Baroque guitar. Add to that some jittery angularities and hefty guitar workouts right out of the King Crimson playbook and a bit of jazzy fusion touches and WOBBLER delivered one heckuva debut album.

The blip of an intro "Serenade For 1652" lasts only 41 seconds but provides the proper tone to set for the album's running time as it displays a diverse mix of Baroque classical, folk and Renaissance styled sounds. Next up the behemoth of a title track is the album's highlight with a near 28 minute running time. This track wends and winds through a series of disparate moods as it changes tempos and emphasis on different styles with an underpinning of a melodic development that creates a wide range of variations as the track tackles ELP styled symphonic prog, heavy rock, Baroque guitar passages and more pastoral segments. It also debuts the band's weakest link at this point and that would be vocalist Tony Johannsessen whose vox box isn't exactly detrimental to the duties at hand but also don't really have that over the top extra gusto to pull off a mind blowing performance like Andreas Wettergreen Strømman Prestmo would on future albums. Luckily most of this track and the entire album for that matter is dedicated to instrumental workouts.

The other two tracks "Rubato Industry" and "Clair Obscur" are thematically similar to the title track and simply offer new melodic developments and an infinite variety of tempo changes, time signature workouts and intricate instrumental interplay that somehow summarizes the entire classic 70s prog scene without actually sounding like any of the bigwigs that provided the inspiration behind this prog gumbo. "Rubato Industry" tends to focus more on extreme time signature rich prog workouts throughout its near 13 minute run whereas "Clair Obscur" tones things down a bit and goes for a more melancholic pastoral feel with orchestrated atmospheric backdrops that includes some of the most prevalent use of mellotrons on the album. As it heats up it also includes some of the best Steve Howe-esque guitar solos and provides some more ELP keyboard workouts.

WOBBLER may not have quite hit the home run that they did with the critically acclaimed perfection of "From Silence To Somewhere" but they did prove without a doubt on HINTERLAND that these guys clearly had done their homework in the prog university of sound and more than had the chops to pull it off. While it would take a few more albums and a more talented vocalist to achieve the distinct honor of true modern day prog deity status, HINTERLAND is nevertheless a beautifully constructed album that is faithful to the retro timeline without sounding as if the band is actually from that era. This album provides a wonderful array of distinctly classic sounds only displayed in a highly fertile and creative manner that exudes an overly enthusiastic attention paid to every detail and then taken a few notches further. In some ways, this album sounds like an otherworldly collaboration of all the greats of the past. Imagination ELP, Yes, Gentle Giant, Museo Rosenbach, King Crimson, Jethro Tull and Genesis all morphing into a single cohesive unit for a mere hour and that is pretty much what you can expect. This debut is not to be missed!

 Afterglow by WOBBLER album cover Studio Album, 2009
3.81 | 289 ratings

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Afterglow
Wobbler Symphonic Prog

Review by patrickq
Prog Reviewer

3 stars It's tough to figure out whether Afterglow is a bona fide album or a stopgap release.

According to Wobbler's bandcamp page, the music and lyrics were written ten years before Afterglow was released in 2009. I find that interesting because this Oslovian quintet evidently put the production of this album on hold to create their debut album, Hinterland, in 2005. Some have interpreted the timeline as an indication that Afterglow is a collection of cast-off songs from a group that was otherwise unable to assemble a sophomore album.

Afterglow is comprised of two longer pieces (one fifteen minutes, one thirteen) interleaved among three shorter tunes. Some fans see the total running time (under 35 minutes) as another indication that this is an odds-and-sods affair, especially given that Hinterland was nearly an hour long.

Stylistically, Afterglow is all over the place, which is probably why I feel this album should be classified as "neo-prog." "Imperial Winter White," one of the two longer tracks, is a good illustration. It begins with a heavy-prog feel à la "Machine Messiah" through the first two minutes, then moves on to a more pastoral section via a bit of King Crimson. Lots of syncopation throughout, with the bass cranked up. At four minutes this gives way to a solo acoustic guitar, but in less than a minute, we're back in heavy, full-band territory. Then a "dry-ice" section, more heavy prog, this time more symphonic, and at around 7:20, a brief vocal section starts, reminiscent of Van der Graaf Generator. Then the band kicks back in. I'd be lying if I said there weren't a few seconds of disco guitar beginning at 8:23. Hammond solo, brief bass-guitar breaks, Mellotron strings, realistic flute. Then a nice groove kicks in around 9:48. Arpeggios, not solos - - this section feels like the backing to a vocal verse. A bit of noodling begins at 10:45: first flute, then electric guitar. Then a change in feel, followed by a change in rhythm, all signaling a new section, which is like the "Willow Farm" section of "Supper's Ready" sung by a progressive-metal vocalist. A false sectional ending at 12:00 is followed by one more verse, and at 12:39, a transition: descending organ chords over what feels like a ritardando. The new section is softer, slower, with flute and violin over piano - - and at 13:26 we've returned to the heavy, sinister, "Machine Messiah" section. My son says this sounds like a mix of older Genesis and Metallica. The final half-minute, starting around 14:30, is an appropriately bombastic send-off. The thirteen-minute "In Taberna" is an entirely different song cut from the entirely same stock.

And then there are the short pieces. Afterglow opens with the rustic "The Haywain," a deceptively nice little number which prepares not the listener for the heaviness of "Imperial Winter White." "Interlude" is a pensive solo acoustic-guitar piece bridging the two long pieces; and "Armoury" sounds like a march for mechanical toy men in a mad inventor's workshop - - for the first two minutes. Then a pipe organ takes over, and the song devolves into white noise and a few fading synth notes, finishing kind of like Fish Out of Water by Chris Squire.

In certain respects, Afterglow does in fact seem like a stopgap album, but not a makeshift one. It has a consistent sound throughout, and although the short pieces are of styles very different from the long pieces, the listener is prepared for stylistic deviance partway through the second track.

Afterglow is evidently intended for fans of a wide variety of subgenres of 1970s progressive rock. There's plenty of prog-folk, symphonic, and heavy-prog content, and the whole package seems to fit the definition of "eclectic prog," whatever that means. But because it so self-consciously checks off so many boxes, Afterglow is a neo-prog record, even if it doesn't sound like Marillion.

Afterglow is a solid album, and a good indication of the direction in which Wobbler would head; it's practically a blueprint for the opening number of Silence to Somewhere.

 From Silence To Somewhere by WOBBLER album cover Studio Album, 2017
4.42 | 591 ratings

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From Silence To Somewhere
Wobbler Symphonic Prog

Review by dougmcauliffe

5 stars Edit 10/20/19* Still a 10/10 but I just wanna go more in depth after dozens of repeated listening sessions.

I don't generally write reviews, but this album is truly special. This album can stand tall among past symphonic masterpieces.

First I must note the production, it is incredible. I might say that it is flawless. The bass hits very hard, the keys and guitars sound heavy and I cant point to any real flaws.

The album opens with the epic 20 minute title track: "From Silence to Somewhere." The song goes through many different sections and movements. The first "verse" is absolutely controlled by the fantastic vocals and lyrics. I can't stress this enough, the delivery of the vocals is chilling throughout the entire song. There is a great flute/recorder section in here that is worth noting.

We go through many different wonderful segments but the centerpiece of this song is the middle "jam" section starting around the 9:45 mark. This section of music might just be the greatest piece of symphonic prog ive ever heard. Every member is going absolutely ham on their respective instruments but nobody more so than whoever is playing the keys here. Around the 15 minute mark the verse from the beginning comes back and quickly evolves into the songs grand climax. For the final minutes we are treated to an acoustic section like nothing ive ever heard before. A chilling ending to a symphonic masterpiece. (10/10)

Then we have the transitional piano-led instrumental "Rendered in Shades of Green". I see it as a nice cool down from the explosive title track. In fact, I kind of consider it part of the title track since it comes directly after. It's got a great doomy undertone and features great instrumentation including a violin!

Following that is the most intense song the album has to offer, "Fermented Hours." A dark keyboard intro fades us in slowly building up to a great shout from the singer quickly followed by the entire band going full power. Guitars wail in the background for a bit before the vocals explosively come in. What follows is a brilliant click organ section with some subtle acoustic guitar in the background. I may sound like a broken record, but the vocals in this section are absolutely phenomenal. Following this, we get another change up with an organ riff bringing us into the next faster paced section. Eventually the riff from the beginning comes back in even heavier than before. A nice touch is the shouted foreign words (I assume Norwegian) that accompany the main riff. 10/10

Closing the album is the lovely "Foxlight." This song opens with a nice but mysterious sounding acoustic guitar. Along with this is some woodwind instrumentation that paints the picture of a snowy Norwegian river. This section builds up to a halting stop as a harpsichord takes over. What we are treated with next is more power from the entire band followed by a delightful harpsichord solo. We slowly fade out. But it ain't over yet!

Even if the pieces change....

My god the last 3 minutes are pure bliss. I ever so slightly prefer the first two tracks but without a doubt, this is amazing. (9.5/10)

For me this is a top 3 progressive rock album of all time, perfection from start to finish.

10/10

5 Stars

 Rites At Dawn by WOBBLER album cover Studio Album, 2011
3.98 | 486 ratings

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Rites At Dawn
Wobbler Symphonic Prog

Review by steelyhead

5 stars

I am not a fan of the first two albums of Wobbler. It is OK music for people who try too hard to be like the old days. Even the use of the Mellotron seems somewaht forced to me so I was not at all convinced to give a spin to their new offering.

Big mistake...this is pure bliss in form of music. The long lost album of Yes that they have recorded. You can hear Squire, Howe and even the drums have the right time signature. This is not a hommage this is a magnificent way to remember times gone by.

I am in love with this album, please don't stop making music

 From Silence To Somewhere by WOBBLER album cover Studio Album, 2017
4.42 | 591 ratings

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From Silence To Somewhere
Wobbler Symphonic Prog

Review by Chaser

4 stars IT'S NOT THE MESSIAH, IT'S A VERY NICE ALBUM

Many progressive rock fans desperately crave a modern prog classic in order to show that progressive rock did not become obsolete in 1977, and that the 21st century is capable of producing prog rock albums that are on a par with the 1970's heyday of prog.

So, when Norwegian prog band Wobbler released this album in 2017, there were many in the prog community who instantly hailed it as the incarnation of a prog rock classic to rival the great classic albums of the golden age of prog.

Such lofty claims mean that this album deserves special attention and consideration.

Let's begin by saying that this is a wonderfully crafted album, with excellent musicianship and great production quality.

The opening of the album is one of the best openings you are likely to hear in prog, as a gentle prelude gives way to a stunning intro piece that smacks you full in the face with towering guitars and organ in an infectious high energy riff that grabs your full attention from the get go.

The title track is very strong throughout and, were the whole album of the same quality and intensity, then the album would certainly be a contender for the top table of prog rock albums.

Unfortunately, whilst the musicianship remains excellent throughout the album, the composition loses intensity as the album progresses, and, by the time we get to the final track of the album "Foxlight", my attention begins to drift somewhat in parts of the track.

The band do pull it back and the album ends strongly, but, for me, the album lacks the total consistency of excellence throughout to be considered amongst the greatest classics of the genre.

Furthermore, an all time prog rock classic album should possess moments of true originality that delight and surprise the listener. I listen to an album like "Relayer" from Yes and, after more than thirty years of listening I remain stunned at the sheer creativity exhibited in that album. For me "From Silence to Somewhere" does not contain the originality and musical ingenuity required in a true masterpiece of the genre.

Ultimately, whilst Wobbler are to be commended on creating a wonderful album full of great music, they are, for me, followers of the giants of the 1970's and not true originators in their own right.

Despite that assessment, this is still a great record, and the opening track in particular is a spectacular display of symphonic prog at its very best. I'm just not sure that, overall, the album takes progressive rock in new and surprising directions, rather it reprises the golden age of prog rock, albeit in a truly wonderful way.

Is this album the holy grail of modern progressive rock? Does it deserve a seat at the top table along side such classics as Close to the Edge, Selling England by the Pound, and Thick as a Brick? Well, not for me, but it is an excellent album all the same and many progressive rock fans will enjoy this album very much and will be very pleased to have it as part of their collection.

Definitely recommended.

 From Silence To Somewhere by WOBBLER album cover Studio Album, 2017
4.42 | 591 ratings

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From Silence To Somewhere
Wobbler Symphonic Prog

Review by Luqueasaur

3 stars TOO comfortably prog: 7/10

Often modern bands play odes to progressive rock, but almost as a mystic and distressing law of nature they sound like cheap imitations or uninspired covers of the prog's giants. Yet in 2017 a massive Scandinavian storm called Wobbler blasted the skies of the prog world and poured delicious symphonic nectar called From Silence to Somewhere over all continents, quenching the thirsty fans of the genres with an album that successfully encapsulates and homages the genre's heyday. It has it all: symphonic melodies and arrangements, dynamic and Mellotron-tainted instrumental breaks, folksy pastoral interludes, long compositions. The rejuvenating rain the inhabitants of Progland were all craving for. So, if too you are a fan of symphonic prog on withdrawal, Wobbler's holy water is the medicine you're desperately requiring.

But the issue is... I'm not a fan of symphonic prog on withdrawal. And I felt From Silence to Somewhere to be severely underwhelming.

There's nothing I haven't heard before in here: symphonic melodies and arrangements, dynamic and Mellotron-tainted musical interludes, folksy pastoral interludes, long compositions; all factors of a consecrated musical formula. There is no audacity to go further than the established frontiers of their genre, and Wobbler's musical output sounds like a safe, unadventurous journey. That's not inherently an issue. Sometimes people yearn for familiarity and there's nothing with assembling a product to tackle that market. But I'm not part of that market. So three stars from me.

(And, as far as ProgArchives' rating is concerned as of now, a rating of 4.45 and 19th place feels absurd.)

Thanks to ProgLucky for the artist addition. and to Quinino for the last updates

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