Progarchives, the progressive rock ultimate discography

WOBBLER

Symphonic Prog • Norway


From Progarchives.com, the ultimate progressive rock music website

Wobbler picture
Wobbler biography
Founded in Hønefoss, Norway in 1999

The line-up consists of Lars Fredrik Froislie (of WHITE WILLOW) on keyboards, Kristian Karl Hultgren on bass guitar, Martin Nordrum Kneppen on drums, Morten Andreas Eriksen on electric and acoustic guitars and mandolin and Tony Johannessen on vocals. This group is strongly evocative of KING CRIMSON, GENESIS, GENTLE GIANT along with newer symphonic prog bands like ANGLAGARD and ANEKDOTEN with a dash of Scandinavian folk and classical influences thrown into the mix.

Their debut CD WOBBLER "Hinterland" contains long and complex tracks featuring lush, vintage keyboard sounds, making extensive use of Mellotron, Mini-Moog, Hammond C-3 and harpsichord, along with beautiful electric and acoustic guitar playing, a complex rhythm section along with flutes, recorder, saxophones, mandolins and various other instruments providing a very full, symphonic sound.

Highly recommended for fans of the early progressive greats and symphonic prog music.

: : : TheProgtologist, USA : : :

⭐ Collaborators Top Prog Album of 2017 ⭐

WOBBLER forum topics / tours, shows & news


WOBBLER forum topics Create a topic now
WOBBLER tours, shows & news Post an entries now

WOBBLER Videos (YouTube and more)


Showing only random 3 | Search and add more videos to WOBBLER

Buy WOBBLER Music



More places to buy WOBBLER music online

WOBBLER discography


Ordered by release date | Showing ratings (top albums) | Help Progarchives.com to complete the discography and add albums

WOBBLER top albums (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

3.82 | 417 ratings
Hinterland
2005
3.84 | 359 ratings
Afterglow
2009
4.00 | 576 ratings
Rites at Dawn
2011
4.37 | 759 ratings
From Silence to Somewhere
2017
4.33 | 342 ratings
Dwellers of the Deep
2020

WOBBLER Live Albums (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

WOBBLER Videos (DVD, Blu-ray, VHS etc)

WOBBLER Boxset & Compilations (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

WOBBLER Official Singles, EPs, Fan Club & Promo (CD, EP/LP, MC, Digital Media Download)

4.79 | 10 ratings
Wobbler (demo)
2003
4.30 | 10 ratings
Lá Bealtaine
2011
4.18 | 11 ratings
This Past Presence
2011
4.61 | 28 ratings
Five Rooms
2020
4.42 | 19 ratings
Naiad Dreams
2020

WOBBLER Reviews


Showing last 10 reviews only
 Rites at Dawn by WOBBLER album cover Studio Album, 2011
4.00 | 576 ratings

BUY
Rites at Dawn
Wobbler Symphonic Prog

Review by ElChanclas

4 stars I first heard of Wobbler around the end of 2020 thanks to Pete Pardo's amazing YT Chanel S.O.T. when their latest studio album Dwellers of the Deep was being reviewed and discussed. I looked up for it, listened to it and was immediately hooked. But digging into their catalog I came across their third studio Album Rites at Dawn and everything I already felt for the band and their music triplicated. I'm not a musical genius or anything and there's an overwhelming amount of classic music still unknown to my ears to call myself a critic? I just review for fun and to share what I think is good music and deserves public awareness? so I apologize in advance if my description of their sound si not accurate, bu here it goes? With a very distinctive Scandinavian sound, this wonderful Norwegian band sounds to me like Jethro Tull/Genesis in steroids, with YES-like vocals and Crimson-style harmonies resulting in just beautifulness and musical perfection. Lucid opens the album with a keyboard created ambient that rapidly immerses the listener into the music, short and straight forward building a bridge to the uptempo madness that Lá Bealtaine brings, with a very tight structure that somehow resembles the Close to the Edge atmosphere but in their own way, exceptionally executed guitar layers accompanying the masterful work of Lars Fredrik Frøislie who is, at least to my ears, an immensely talented musician "Old graces, yours the answers I seek. Oh, sisters, tell me, Oh, witches, thrown into the stream, Oh, sisters, hear me. Shapeshifters, coloured fish in my dream. Oh, sisters, lead me. Turn the day & lights. Whilst crossing through the tide" is just an example of the profound and magical lyrical content that the listener will encounter here.

In Orbit starts with a nice acoustic guitar passage that with help of the angelical vocal harmonies builds up into electric guitar and keyboard licks tandem before returning to a mellow vocal passage and back up again to symphonic progressive galore, 12 plus minutes of genius! And lets not forget to mention the rhythmic section which is simply outstanding and super tight! This Past Presence almost seems to bring the same formula as its predecesor with the acoustic intro, although flutes are finally brought to the table, but its really not the case, this piece is anthemic form the beginning, reminding me a little of Anekdoten at moments maybe because of the galactic and unearthly keyboard work which again its just magnificent throughout the whole album, a shorter song but not less memorable. Another short one (to their standards at least) A Faerie's Play plays more like a hit single, if that's something that can be considered done by such a band in such a genre, with a very distinguished sometimes Iimmi-Like guitar work that preciously entangles with the rest of the instruments which in this specific song are letting the six string showcase the most. And then The River, my favorite song from the album (maybe the most Tullish one), the one that made me put headphones on and dismembered the musical experience, simply perfection. All the elements previously mentioned are present and definitely upgraded, like if they wanted to bring everything to the table? acoustic, electric, fast and furious, slow and melodic, like an ode to Earth and nature and its importance in their synergy with humans "?You run wild and far, and by your banks we may find rest at last, our common life is all there is, your soul equals our reflections, constantly you drift past us. With us, beneath us, upstream, downstream?" impossible not to fall in love with its melodies and lyrics, energetically bright and brilliant, beautiful. Lucid Dreams closes the cycle returning all eras to the starting sonic ambience from the opening track but with the proper feel of a masterpiece fading, operatic, classical and magical. The End!

 Dwellers of the Deep by WOBBLER album cover Studio Album, 2020
4.33 | 342 ratings

BUY
Dwellers of the Deep
Wobbler Symphonic Prog

Review by A Crimson Mellotron

4 stars 'Dwellers of the Deep' is the fifth studio album by Norwegian retro-proggers Wobbler, released in 2020, some three years after their highly praised magnum opus of lush symphonic rock 'From Silence to Somewhere'. This record is hardly different - but why exactly? It is certainly the same style that they presented on the precedent album, focusing a tiny bit more on composition, making 'Dwellers' somehow more tight. However, this takes none of the enjoyment of the listening experience - the magnificent and largely lush retro prog sound, that also is the reason for many comparisons to Yes to be drawn, is still here, it is quite recognizable, and it is unsurprisingly the reason for which this mysterious Nordic band is so highly regarded.

No changes in the lineup means that the five members of Wobbler could focus on expanding their scope, and maybe stretching out a bit further the 70s symphonic prog sound they are going for (and successfully championing it!), so that they can simultaneously meet the high expectations after their 2017 work of grandiosity, and not make a repetitive sequel of it.

'Dwellers of the Deep' kicks off with the nearly 14-minute 'By the Banks' - the massive retro keyboard sound takes the listener on from the very first second of this record, just to introduce the rest of the band that go on to play another mind-wobbling instrumental introduction. This is a more dynamic number from the band, and a fantastic way to open the album.

After that comes the pretty perfect 8-minute song 'Five Rooms' - I am seriously doubtful whether they recorded this in 2020, or they went back in time, probably somewhere around 1972, and recorded this in the same studio where Yes were doing whatever they were doing back then. It is a gorgeous celebration of that old-school prog fiesta sound that we usually associate with Yes and Gentle Giant. At the same time, the attention to detail and the wacky shifts that the band does, reminds strongly of King Crimson and Änglagård. However, most importantly these guys remain Wobbler all the time, and I think that with the previous album and now this one, it can be safely stated that these Norwegians have pretty much nailed a recognizable sound of their own!

'Naiad Dreams' is a very gentle and almost entirely acoustic piece, representing the more lyrical and calmer side of Wobbler that goes on to introduce the big winner of the album - the 20-minute 'Merry Macabre'. This is an epic that is nothing like the epics that Wobbler's peers release these days, as it sounds pretty sinister, extravagant, and compelling, almost diverging from the uplifting tone of the rest of the album; divided into three parts, each of which seems to get darker and weirder, it is more than exciting to see the Norwegians in such light, and if I were to guess, this is a shade of their music they will continue to explore on future releases... hopefully!

All in all, 'Dwellers of the Deep' is an excellent album, another great achievement for Wobbler that will certainly age as one of the best moments in their discography; probably not as astoundingly lush and melancholic as its precedent, but nonetheless a very well-constructed album that makes perfects sense... well, probably not the mythological lyrics, but musically as a whole! A highly recommended band and album.

 Afterglow by WOBBLER album cover Studio Album, 2009
3.84 | 359 ratings

BUY
Afterglow
Wobbler Symphonic Prog

Review by sgtpepper

4 stars This time, we have dinstinctly more classical influence, namely Renaissance and Baroque. The compositions are more packed with action, they are less derivative of the 70's retro-prog. The keyboard collection continues to be impressive and we get a real church organ in the majestic "Armoury" that has Wakeman traits. There are multiple change shifts, instrumental intensive passages reminiscent of Anglagard.

You can still spot a couple of folk elements in music and there are emotions too, mostly majestic, solemn or melancholic. There is a bit more variety in music than on a previous album but music is also less accessible.

This is another well executed Wobbler album.

 Hinterland by WOBBLER album cover Studio Album, 2005
3.82 | 417 ratings

BUY
Hinterland
Wobbler Symphonic Prog

Review by sgtpepper

4 stars At the time when this album came out, I was pretty blown away by the music of this album - great sounds, solemn atmosphere and all I knew already from the major prog acts of the 70's. In the course of years, my judgement has altered a bit - not in the album's favour. One thing is hearing genuine analogue synthesizers and other keyboards, the other one is hearing something very progressive or original. There is no doubt the this is a gifted band, in particular the keyboard player who is firmly in lead here and I love keyboard-based prog albums. Guitar comes to forefront sometimes and is inspired by Genesis/King Crimson movement.

The first track is a tour-de-force of Lars Fredrik Frøislie's keyboard repertoire. It is not a strong composition and could have been shorter. The length of the other two tracks is more appropriate, in particular, "Clair Obscur" sounds very Scandinavian a la Anglagard with melancholic motives and perfect tight playing.

I still like this album and it is recommended to all who have a good audio set and don't mind hearing retro 70's prog.

 Dwellers of the Deep by WOBBLER album cover Studio Album, 2020
4.33 | 342 ratings

BUY
Dwellers of the Deep
Wobbler Symphonic Prog

Review by Alhambraf3

3 stars It is difficult to be objective when evaluating the album of a band whose previous album was recognized as a masterpiece, and in a fairly short time after its release. The new album was supposed to give an answer to the band's claims to be the leaders of the modern progressive rock scene.

The originality compared to the previous albums has become even less, and the similarity with YES is even more. And in some moments, the musicians literally copy the techniques and style of YES ("Five Rooms"). However, in the last composition, you can also hear the Van der Graaf Generator from the times of " H To He...".

But the main problem, in my opinion, is still not in this. The album simply lacks variety, bright and beautiful melodies, it is boring and dull. There are some beautiful melodic finds on the album, but this is definitely not enough for the No. 1 band of the modern prog scene. In addition, the same problem can be traced from album to album, which has long been a trend - weak compositional work. Some parts of the compositions are literally roughly glued together. A striking example is "By the Banks", namely, a return to the initial theme after a very beautiful (the most beautiful on the album) harpsichord piece in the finale - the harmonic sounds just crooked and not justified, the return to the key is not prepared, and there is a strong feeling that the musicians simply do not know how to do it correctly. In addition, compositionally, the music is very static. Musicians are so busy with the facade that they forget about what is behind it.

Two points for the music, one plus one for past achievements and my love for YES, for a total of three.

Finally, I would like to ask a question - what would be your assessment of this album out of context " From silence..."

 Dwellers of the Deep by WOBBLER album cover Studio Album, 2020
4.33 | 342 ratings

BUY
Dwellers of the Deep
Wobbler Symphonic Prog

Review by Isaac Peretz

5 stars How do you follow up an album like "From Silence To Somewhere"? With something like Dwellers Of The Deep, of course!

SilverLight59 mentioned the probability of this band being in a "Supernova" state, a state in which the band starts pulling out masterpieces one after the other, but their creative fuel starts running out very quickly. And that's the most probable case, since even beasts like Pink Floyd or Genesis suffered that status. The least probable case is that this has become the standard album quality for Wobbler, and if that's the case then Wobbler might actually be the best symphonic Prog-Rock band in the world.

Dwellers Of The Deep doesn't fall short compared to the band's previous effort, infact, it tops their previous album in some certain areas! Just like From Silence To Somewhere, the albums includes four tracks, one of them being a long epic, From Silence To Somewhere with its title track and Dwellers Of The Deep with Merry Macabre, which are the absolute best from their respective albums (And modern prog rock in general (^o^)). Not only is the music quality of DOTD even more consistent than FSTS's, but the production of the album is even more polished and enjoyable (That's not to say the production of the albums before was mediocre, it was still pretty good).

Just like the album before, this is an absolute must for anyone who enjoys Symphonic Prog Rock. Let's just pray that Wobbler continues this album streak furthermore!

 From Silence to Somewhere by WOBBLER album cover Studio Album, 2017
4.37 | 759 ratings

BUY
From Silence to Somewhere
Wobbler Symphonic Prog

Review by Isaac Peretz

5 stars It's very hard to explain why this album came out as strikingly astonishing as the album shows, despite having a considerably average line of albums preceding it.

Wobbler, a Symphonic Progressive Rock band from Norway, proved themselves capable of making outstanding works in their fourth album, "From Silence To Somewhere". The first very notable influence in this album (and band) is Yes, and King Crimson also plays a serious aspect in this specific album, with the raw Hammond keyboards presented in Larks' Tongues In Aspic (Pretty funny how even the artwork of FSTS is similar to LTIA's). After five arduous years for their fans, the band released their magnum opus (at that time), which sounded like it was taken right out of a 70s prog album catalog. This is a must-have for anyone who enjoys Yes, King Crimson and/or Genesis, or for anyone who enjoys symphonic Progressive Rock in general.

 Rites at Dawn by WOBBLER album cover Studio Album, 2011
4.00 | 576 ratings

BUY
Rites at Dawn
Wobbler Symphonic Prog

Review by Progfan97402
Prog Reviewer

5 stars To me this is the first truly great Wobbler album. These guys had really done their homework here. I honestly didn't miss their previous vocalist Tony Johannessen as his vocals were a bit difficult for me to take. In comes Andreas Prestmo, once a vocalist for Les Fleurs du Mal (an early incarnation of Tusmørke) and his vocals are more easy on my ears. The band was no longer trying to be the next Änglagård but they went for a more melodic symphonic prog approach with obvious Yes and Gentle Giant influences. The songs are shorter but a couple pieces do go over 10 minutes. Lars Fredrik Frøislie had purchased himself a Chamberlin M1 from an American seller and puts it to good use alongside his Mellotron. Here the music has an even more retro vibe to the point you could be easily fooled for a '70s recording. The music has a more pastoral feel despite largely using electric instruments. The band also kept the album around 45 minutes just right for a single LP. Nothing like the Flower Kings where a two CD set totaling 2 hours is modest. For me Rites at Dawn is the first in a winning streak that continues with From Silence to Somewhere and Dwellers of the Deep. This is their first essential album that's a must have!
 Rites at Dawn by WOBBLER album cover Studio Album, 2011
4.00 | 576 ratings

BUY
Rites at Dawn
Wobbler Symphonic Prog

Review by Muskrat

4 stars New start.

After ten years of slump where few progs seem to appreciate the music offered by Wobbler, Lars Fredrik Froislie's team decides to change direction. In this decision, the choice of Andreas Prestmo as the new singer is decisive. The clear timbre of his voice which immediately recalls that of Yes (a strange mix between John Anderson and Cris Squire), and the almost constant presence of the song within the pieces, naturally directs the band's music in a new direction. Despite this, the release of Rites at Dawn did not bring the expected success. Many now blame the group for being too influenced by Yes. However, we are light years away from a tasteless Starcastle clone!

I think those nostalgic for Yes (and to a lesser extent for Gentle Giant, the voice of Andreas at 1:46 from "In Orbit") will be delighted to discover this record. It offers warm and brilliant music, with many alternations between calm and very fast moments. The dark and tortured influence of Anglagard is left aside but Wobbler keeps a rich instrumentation (bassoon, saxophone, flute, glockenspiel), which has been its specificity for more than ten years. In the same way the Scandinavian folk influence is neglected, only the central passage of "The River" is an exception. Lars Fredrik's Wakemanesque piano parts evoke Fragile and Kristian Karl's rumbling bass bring us back to our memories. Also new for the group, we hear here and there many nods to Genesis (for example the intro of "A Fairie's Play", or "In Orbit" at 5:53).

Over the years, recognition of Wobbler's phenomenal work as a symphonic prog band grew, and Rites at Dawn saw their notoriety rise. It is deserved !

 Afterglow by WOBBLER album cover Studio Album, 2009
3.84 | 359 ratings

BUY
Afterglow
Wobbler Symphonic Prog

Review by Muskrat

5 stars Why didn't Wobbler impose himself at the time as Anglagard did? It will always remain a mystery for me? We are nevertheless in the same register: acoustic / electric alternations, many changes of tempo, an exacerbated contrast between violence and calm, harshness and softness, complexity and simplicity, traditional and modern music. We therefore find the same mixture of influences: Scandinavian folk and progressive rock from the 70ths like Yes, King Crimson or Gentle Giant (the only difference being that Anglagard included in Hybris contributions from Genesis). The quality of the quasi-instrumental compositions is there, the recording is irreproachable, the instrumentation rich (flute, cello, medieval instruments).

So what, what have you to sulk about your pleasure? Maybe it's because what Woobler was offering was less aggressive and less tortured? Or that you blame him for imitating Anglagard? For my part, I could only praise them for making me relive the emotions I experienced when I discovered Hybris. Afterglow is a perfect success where three short acoustic pieces frame two epic long suites. The keyboard and leader of the group, Lars Fredrik Froisli, uses a very wide range of instruments (Mellontrons, Hammond, Moog, Rhodes, clavinet, piano) and mainly complements his playing with that of Rick Wakeman (for example the grandiose finale of Armory!). We also find to a lesser extent the influences of Keith Emerson and Kerry Minnear. The atmosphere of this record is rather dark, with multiple sublime passages loaded with emotion. This is really what I expect from a Scandinavian band, typical of their culture and mythology.

I also like Wobbler.2 which is more in line with current progs' expectations, but my preference will always go to the first two Wobbler.1 albums. Afterglow is a record that I will probably never get tired of.

Thanks to ProgLucky for the artist addition. and to Quinino for the last updates

Copyright Prog Archives, All rights reserved. | Legal Notice | Privacy Policy | Advertise | RSS + syndications

Other sites in the MAC network: JazzMusicArchives.com — jazz music reviews and archives | MetalMusicArchives.com — metal music reviews and archives

Donate monthly and keep PA fast-loading and ad-free forever.