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WOBBLER

Symphonic Prog • Norway


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Wobbler biography
Founded in Hønefoss, Norway in 1999

The line-up consists of Lars Fredrik Froislie (of WHITE WILLOW) on keyboards, Kristian Karl Hultgren on bass guitar, Martin Nordrum Kneppen on drums, Morten Andreas Eriksen on electric and acoustic guitars and mandolin and Tony Johannessen on vocals. This group is strongly evocative of KING CRIMSON, GENESIS, GENTLE GIANT along with newer symphonic prog bands like ANGLAGARD and ANEKDOTEN with a dash of Scandinavian folk and classical influences thrown into the mix.

Their debut CD WOBBLER "Hinterland" contains long and complex tracks featuring lush, vintage keyboard sounds, making extensive use of Mellotron, Mini-Moog, Hammond C-3 and harpsichord, along with beautiful electric and acoustic guitar playing, a complex rhythm section along with flutes, recorder, saxophones, mandolins and various other instruments providing a very full, symphonic sound.

Highly recommended for fans of the early progressive greats and symphonic prog music.

: : : TheProgtologist, USA : : :

⭐ Collaborators Top Prog Album of 2017 ⭐

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WOBBLER discography


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WOBBLER top albums (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

3.82 | 383 ratings
Hinterland
2005
3.83 | 319 ratings
Afterglow
2009
3.97 | 520 ratings
Rites at Dawn
2011
4.38 | 690 ratings
From Silence to Somewhere
2017
4.41 | 108 ratings
Dwellers of the Deep
2020

WOBBLER Live Albums (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

WOBBLER Videos (DVD, Blu-ray, VHS etc)

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WOBBLER Official Singles, EPs, Fan Club & Promo (CD, EP/LP, MC, Digital Media Download)

4.44 | 9 ratings
Imperial Winter White Dwarf / Leprechaun Behind the Door
2003
4.64 | 11 ratings
Lá Bealtaine
2011
4.46 | 13 ratings
This Past Presence
2011
4.82 | 22 ratings
Five Rooms
2020
4.29 | 14 ratings
Naiad Dreams
2020

WOBBLER Reviews


Showing last 10 reviews only
 Hinterland by WOBBLER album cover Studio Album, 2005
3.82 | 383 ratings

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Hinterland
Wobbler Symphonic Prog

Review by Progfan97402
Prog Reviewer

3 stars I bought Hinterland in 2007 after hearing the description of the band and I look back at it and it hadn't held as well as Rites at Dawn and From Silence to Somewhere, and now Dwellers of the Deep (which might be a bit premature as it barely came out as of typing, I'm pretty certain it's their crowning achievement as it truly blew me away). Hinterland shows potential but the flaws are a bit obvious. For one thing Tony Johannessen's overwrought vocals are hard to take in. I'm glad he was replaced by Andreas Prestmo as his voice is much more pleasant and improved the band greatly. The other flaw is it's frequently overlong with the title track the most guilty culprit. Sure even that one has great ideas but it's clear the band hasn't figure out how to make their ideas more cohesive. The approach is more bombastic throughout than later releases. Änglagård was the frequent comparison. It even started off similar to Epilog with "Serenade for 1652". Lars Fredrik Frøislie piles it thick with analog keyboards of all sorts, no analog modeling or VST-plugins. Meaning a real Mellotron M400 was used and same for Hammond organ and Minimoog. Other than Änglagård I also detect some ELP and Gentle Giant moves and I almost forgot that gliding tron quote from King Crimson's "Epitaph" on the title track.

As stated, a promising album but it's clear that Rites at Dawn, From Silence to Somewhere and Dwellers of the Deep are superior in every way so go for those first before coming here.

 Dwellers of the Deep by WOBBLER album cover Studio Album, 2020
4.41 | 108 ratings

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Dwellers of the Deep
Wobbler Symphonic Prog

Review by Progfan97402
Prog Reviewer

5 stars To me Dwellers of the Deep is by far the best album they've ever done. I own all their previous releases so I got to see them evolve. This album contains some of their finest recordings ever with "By the Banks", "Five Rooms" and the 19 minute "Merry Macabre". Amazing music all around with Lars Fredrik Frøislie proving sneezing authentic vintage keyboard including Mellotron (and perhaps Chamberlin, he does own an M1). "Naiad Dreams" is calm and largely acoustic, serving as a breather from the intensity of "Five Rooms". I usually should refrain from believing this is as great as many of the classics from the '70s but this album very much is that! Five stars shouldn't be something you throw at but the music so amazed me it deserves that rating. I can't believe the heights Wobbler are soaring with. And I'm really amazed at the drumming of Martin Nordrum Kneppen here, he gives his best drumming here (I also own several Tusmørke albums where he's a member of too). No doubt a highlight for 2020 and some of the finest prog in recent years.
 Dwellers of the Deep by WOBBLER album cover Studio Album, 2020
4.41 | 108 ratings

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Dwellers of the Deep
Wobbler Symphonic Prog

Review by Grumpyprogfan

3 stars If you like 70's prog with mellotron, tinkling Hammond, multiple vocal harmonies, and the full body sound of the Rickenbacker bass, this is the album for you. The audio quality on this CD is very good, proof that CD's can have sonic properties as good as vinyl. I'm going to mention right away that I'm not a fan of the vocalist and that deters from my enjoyment of the music. He sounds similar to Jon Anderson, but his timbre is not for me.

There are four songs on this 45 minute disc and the first two are my favorites. "By the Banks" starts out strong goes through several different grooves. Good song that ends abruptly, as they didn't know how to give it a proper finale. "Five Rooms" starts out with vocals and then quickly turns into a Yes sounding riff. Wobbler definitely showcase their influences on this song and provide an abundance of great playing. Listen close and you hear the Gentle Giant influence at 4:22 and again at 6:50. Not just an influence but almost note for note "Three Friends" riff. "Naiad Dreams" gives us a break from the furious pace of the first two songs and begins with a nylon guitar and then vocals come in. A very sparse song and the shortest on the album. However, it also has a strange unfinished ending to my ears. Closing song "Merry Macabre" (19:00) is the longest on the album, it begins mellow and morphs into more Yes sounding material. I love the bass tone on this song... it kills. In fact, the bass tone, and playing, is outstanding on the entire album. The mellow part around four minutes, causes my mind to wander, but they pick up the pace with a jazzy groove around the seven minute mark. Good song but it has too many meandering bits, for me and the ending is odd again.

Overall, a decent album if you like 70's prog. For those looking for modern sounds you won't find it here. Actually, a 3.5 star release but I'll round down since others rounded up.  

 Dwellers of the Deep by WOBBLER album cover Studio Album, 2020
4.41 | 108 ratings

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Dwellers of the Deep
Wobbler Symphonic Prog

Review by rdtprog
Special Collaborator Heavy / RPI / Symphonic Prog Team

5 stars The last album ''From Silence to Somewhere'' was a good comeback for the band to the greatness of their first demo songs released on their first album. Is the new album will continue on the same level? The first track ''By The Banks'' is a strong track of Retro Prog taking inspiration to Yes first period before Rick Wakeman joins the band. You can enjoy the Moog and Mellotron chords parts throughout the album. There a lot of singing on this album that reinforces the impression of the influence of Yes. ''Five Rooms'' brings a faster pace with some big rolling bass. The next song is a breather with some great arrangements with an acoustic guitar that reminds me of Steve Howe. We have a peaceful atmosphere the perfect song of that genre that keeps the melody flowing. ''Merry Macabre'' is another solid epic with some groovy and tripping parts reminiscent of Anekdoten. Often an album could be a bit too long but on this one, you crave for more after 40 minutes+. Fans of Yes, Gentle Giant, and serious Symphonic Prog lovers that enjoy the dark and light mood of big epics with a vintage sound will not miss this one.
 Dwellers of the Deep by WOBBLER album cover Studio Album, 2020
4.41 | 108 ratings

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Dwellers of the Deep
Wobbler Symphonic Prog

Review by BrufordFreak
Collaborator Honorary Collaborator

4 stars I've been an avid follower and champion of these Norwegians for over ten years, however I think they may have overstayed their their adherence to the choice of YES imitation. As skilled as they are, as remarkable are the "new Yes songs" that they produce, I think it has gone too far. I want to hear more original sounds and more original ideas. Though Rick Wakeman, Chris Squire, and Jon Anderson (and to a lesser degree, Steve Howe and Alan White) should feel flattered, I'm afraid that no one will ever hear of Andreas Wettergreen Strømman Prestmo, Marius Halleland, Lars Fredrik Frøislie, Kristian Karl Hultgren, or Martin Nordrum Kneppen because everyone who hears a Wobbler album will only be hearing and comparing them to Yes.

1. "By the Banks" (13:49) My daughter's name is Persephone. I'm not sure yet whether this song is worthy of sending to her. The main rhythmic pattern and rising and falling chord progressions that the song returns to over an over throughout is memorable enough in a kind of Uriah Heep-approach-to-"South Side of the Sky"-kind of way-- and it is intra-dispersed with many divertissements and stylistic and instrument choice deviations to keep it interesting, but I'm not sure what element or aspect of the Goddess of the Spring and Queen of the Underworld they were going after, cuz I'm not feeling it. The most interesting part of the song, for me, is the unusual (and modern) instrumental bridge from 12:27 to 12:36. The end seems reverential but also quite final due to its abruptness--which, again, leaves me unsure as to what they were trying to express. The construction and instrumental performances are all top notch, it just lacks some (26.5/30)

2. "Five Rooms" (8:28) Wow, that was an odd opening: portentous organ preceding a racehorse start (a bit too wild and frenetic)--like Drama YES. things settle down in the YES-like third minute, and then feel solid YES until the frenzy continues--this time more controlled and smooth than the first time--at the end of the fourth minute. The first "new" (non-YES) idea comes in the middle of the fifth minute (though the drumming style may be non-Yes throughout). (17.5/20)

3. "Naiad Dreams" (4:24) opens with 90 seconds of solo classical guitar. The voice of Andreas Wettergreen Strømman Prestmo enters, singing a verse over the solo guitar before other instruments (bass, glockenspiel, pedal steel electric guitar) finally join in. Thank goodness for the fact that Andreas's voice is distinctive and different from Jon Anderson's, so that a song like this can take on it's own identity instead of being categorized as a "Yes imitation." The addition of the "female(?)" vocalist in the second half is awesome. (8.75/10)

4. "Merry Macabre" (19:00) opens with piano, which is then joined by cymbal play, glockenspiel, and bass before the full band breakout in the second minute. It almost sounds like an opening for a MAGMA Zeuhl song. But then the band launch into a full-forced heavy YES onslaught with Andreas singing over the top with the passion of PETER HAMMILL. I really like the STEPHEN STILLS lead electric guitar meandering around over and within the weave during the second and third minutes of this one--and then the 1980s rhythm guitar arpeggi in the instrumental fourth minute. The organ play is wonderful. A sparsely populated section in the fourth and fifth minutes provides a little respite before the next (jazzy) full band section at 6:25. There is an interesting bounce to the Hammond in the eighth minute. Then it gets a little jazzier (ANDY TILLISON-like) in the ninth and tenth minutes before softening into a gorgeous early-KC/ANEKDOTEN- like portentous weave at 9:30. Andreas joins in briefly to offer some simple words in the eleventh minute before an excellent (and wholly original) instrumental passage with psychedelic-treated voice mixed within ensues. It's almost REINE FISKE/PAATOS-like here. Awesome as the craziness builds and builds well into the fourteenth minute before a MiniMoog at 13:30 leads a shift toward a less-pleasing more rock section. At 14:30 everything drops out for piano and Andreas singing. This sounds like German band ANYONE'S DAUGHTER! The solo piano runs off into a very classical-sounding passage until an old synth joins in during the seventeenth minute and then the whole band jumps back in with an insistent pace reminding me of MOTORPSYCHO. Nice keyboard and cymbal work in this passage as the vocalist(s) try to wrap it up. Overall a pretty cool journey into the "darker" side of Wobbler (which really isn't very dark). (35.25/40)

Total Time 45:41

The mastery of composition and performance is still there. The sound production is superb. The YES-sound and - style patterns are still dominant, but there may be a little more variety on display here than on previous Wobbler releases. Though the multi-voice vocal harmonies are excellent (probably even better than those of YES), I feel too often that these guys are going too far to try to replicate the Yes weaves. Also, this album, for me, lacks the memorable melodic hooks of the two previous albums.

B+/4.5 stars; an excellent addition to any prog lover's music collection--especially if you adore 1970s Yes music.

 Dwellers of the Deep by WOBBLER album cover Studio Album, 2020
4.41 | 108 ratings

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Dwellers of the Deep
Wobbler Symphonic Prog

Review by siLLy puPPy
Collaborator PSIKE, JR/F/Canterbury & Eclectic Teams

4 stars It was only a mere four years ago that the Norwegian band WOBBLER really stepped things up and usurped the throne as kings of retro prog with its fourth album "From Silence To Somewhere," an album so authentically steeped in vintage everything that you could really capture the zeitgeist of 1972 with Vietnam War protest fatigue, the Munich Olympics terrorist attacks, Watergate scandals and Coca Cola preaching how they'd like to teach the world to sing. The album was carefully planned and dripping with classic prog-isms that made you wish you could go back and time and trip out at a Yes concert. The world was stunned since the band's previous three efforts were decent but paled in comparison to the mighty roar of the sounds of "Silence."

When a band rockets into superstardom, even in underground musical terms, many things can happen. A given band can repeat the formula ad nauseam and milk it for all its worth, a given band can totally go off the rail and unleash their unrestrained avant-garde fantasies and alienate the fanbase or a given band can gracefully move on but not deviating too far from the album that put them on the map and eschew the temptation of making a carbon copy. The latter is exactly how WOBBLER has decided to proceed with its newfound glory in the prog spotlight and three years later makes a triumphant return with its eagerly anticipated followup and fifth album DWELLERS OF THE DEEP.

Once agin WOBBLER goes for the 70s retro jugular with the quintet of Andreas Wettergreen Strømman Prestmo (vocals, guitars), Marius Halleland (guitars, backing vocals), Lars Fredrik Frøislie (keyboards), Kristian Karl Hultgren (bass) and Martin Nordrum Kneppen (drums) forging that perfect middle ground somewhere in a parallel universe where classic bands like Yes, Genesis, Camel and a dash of Gentle Giant were all fused together for a moment and cranked out a bunch of albums. While some whippersnappers call this stuff vintage dad rock, others are called to evoke the sacred spirit of classic prog and remember how the wizards of yore constructed some of the most grandiose constructs tucked in the paradigm of rock music and celebrate its timelessness.

Graced with gorgeous eye-catching cover art, it's immediately apparent before even pushing play that DWELLERS OF THE DEEP finds WOBBLER staunchly positioned with its hand on the pulse of the retro prog loving public and fears are set aside of a botched comeback attempt once the wobbling keyboards, Christ Squire inspired bass lines and vocal nods to Jon Anderson come roaring through as the opening track "By The Banks" wends and winds through its proggy soundscape for a whopping playing time of nearly 14 minutes. WOBBLER is back and all fears are extinguished as this album of four tracks continues the magnanimity of its predecessor without skipping a beat! The album's four songs are divided into two lengthy prog behemoths, "By The Banks" at 13:49 and the album's highlight, the closing 19 minute sprawler "Merry Macabre" with two shorter tracks "Five Rooms" and "Naiad Dreams" tucked in between.

Like many prog albums, DWELLERS OF THE DEEP attempts to craft a nebulous concept about the roller coaster of human emotions crafted in a matrix of sonic tapestries that are designed to unite the present and the past. "By The Banks" bursts into your consciousness by breaking out the big guns of prog, namely gnarled keyboard attacks, time signature freedom and even a bit of nostalgic venturing into classic rock tracks like Boston's "Foreplay / Long Time" for a wee little moment which is WOBBLER's signature star power namely the ability to evoke many moments of the past without actually copying them! If retro prog is your calling then you've come to the right prog album here as the carefully designed constructs instantly transport you to the rickety basement studio where a bunch of hippies with greater musical ambitions spend their days mining riffs and polishing notes until they all shine with a sensual sheen!

Once the established mood is set on the 14 minute opener designed to pacify any lingering doubts that WOBBLER would "de-prog," the yellow brick road of "By The Banks" finds the band in good form as they traverse the 70s soundscapes effortlessly with one melodic groove transmogrifying into another existing somewhere between the hard rocking world of Yes' early 70s albums like "Close To The Edge" to medieval folk splendor in the form of band like Gryphon and early Genesis and if you hadn't picked up on the Yes-isms yet, the thundering roar of "Five Rooms" will leave you no way of denying it. This "short" track of only 8 1/2 minutes will evoke a taste of "Roundabout," "Close To The Edge" and other rhythmic complexities a la Squire, Howe, Bruford and Wakeman and like the Yes album title, skirts too close for comfort at times but never stays too close to the sun lest it burst into flames. No way, WOBBLER is too clever in how they flirt with greatness but then take the seas of rhythmic and melody into their own.

"Naiad Dreams," a track of only 4 1/2 minutes begins with a nice classical guitar intro and maintains a nice chilled Renaissance fair vibe that serves as a nice intermission before the album's best and most daring track "Merry Macabre" prances on for exactly 19 minutes with a series of classic prog gymnastics that finds a merry-go-round of prog workouts and psychedelic meanderings that culminate in a climactic conclusion of one of the most anticipated prog albums of the year. In conclusion, WOBBLER have hit another home run for sure with DWELLERS OF THE DEEP however the wow factor seems to be missing from this one. Something about "From Somewhere To Silence" had that touched by God feel whereas this one doesn't quite measure up to the perfection of its predecessor.

Despite what i deem as a slightly inferior album as a whole to "Silence," make no doubt about it - WOBBLER is back and back with a bang. Had this album really emerged in 1972 it would have indeed become one of the classics of the era but in reality there is only so much retro prog i'm willing to engage in on a profound level and unless it reaches the height of perfection as did "Silence," then i can only get excitied at the level of declaring this an EXCELLENT album and not whipping out the masterpiece designation. For those more enthralled with this style of prog then they will not be disappointed one little bit. Commence the dwelling! The deep beckons!

 Dwellers of the Deep by WOBBLER album cover Studio Album, 2020
4.41 | 108 ratings

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Dwellers of the Deep
Wobbler Symphonic Prog

Review by higi88

5 stars Once again Wobbler gave the prog rock world another masterpiece. I've listened to this album 10 times in a row. Beautiful mix of heavy, symphonic, eclectic music makes this album in my opinion one of the best prog albums of all time. After they made From silence to somewhere I could not wait to see what will they do next and now after hearing this album I know this band is only getting better. I will not compare them to any of the classic 70's bands I will only say that Wobbler now has their own trademark sound. By the banks is the greatest album opener ever, that riff made my mind explode it's so heavy and it welcomes you to a unforgettable journey, Five rooms is a unstoppable prog force, brilliant drumming and amazing bass playing, Naiad Dreams is a great passage to epic 19 minutes Merry Macabre fantastic closer, the end of the song is a perfect end of this perfect album.
 From Silence to Somewhere by WOBBLER album cover Studio Album, 2017
4.38 | 690 ratings

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From Silence to Somewhere
Wobbler Symphonic Prog

Review by higi88

5 stars When you hear the beginning of this album and if you love pure prog rock it will blow your mind. Amazing epic that takes you to another dimension, this is a true statment of power, beautiful and heavy, dark and light tones that makes this one of the best pieces ever written. Rendered in Shades of Greenis a haunting but relaxing entrence to mighty Fermented Hours, a 10 minute explosion of blistering prog and fantastic musicianship. Foxlight is a last song on the album and also a brilliant one beautiful piano, organs, melody's. Lyrics on this album are mysterious and they compliment the music fantastically. All in all this is a classic prog album and when it grabbes your attention it will not let you go.
 Dwellers of the Deep by WOBBLER album cover Studio Album, 2020
4.41 | 108 ratings

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Dwellers of the Deep
Wobbler Symphonic Prog

Review by Soul2Create

4 stars Finally, the new album by Wobbler is out. The revival of the Symphonic prog rock started in the 90s in Scandinavia wih Landberk, Anglagard, Par Lindh and Anekdoten, presenting a style that combined the most English/Italian vein of 70s symphonic prog rock with somber/desolated and folk passages, and with good doses of experimentation. Of all those bands, I think that Wobbler is the one that has best managed to incarnate this spirit, and the one I enjoy the most. So, what do we have here?

By the banks (9.5/10) - A mini epic that seems a lost theme from their previous album, From Silence to Somewhere, and that serves as a perfect bridge between the two works. I love the first half, but there are some moments of the second one that I find little disjoined.

Five rooms (10/10) - If Wobbler does something good, is to be heavy whithout forgetting the melody. Here, all the song builds a crescendo towards the great finale. This track is a masterpiece itself and it has that Canterbury organ that I love so much.

Naiad dreams (6/10) - This one is a miss for me. It is beautiful, no doubt, but I expected something more like Rendered in Shades of green.

Merry macabre (9/10) - A very good epic that starts with a mellow but tense piano and builds up a brlliant and complex palette of sounds. So much influences here, from Renaissance, Yes (especially Wakeman) to Gentle Giant. Check the ending please. Amazing.

Overall, a nearly perfect album that does not reach the heights of their previous one, but that will be in the top 5 of albums of the year for sure. Highly recommended.

 From Silence to Somewhere by WOBBLER album cover Studio Album, 2017
4.38 | 690 ratings

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From Silence to Somewhere
Wobbler Symphonic Prog

Review by Kempokid
Collaborator Prog Metal Team

3 stars As a fan of classic prog on the whole, retro prog bands like Wobbler have always been of some interest to me, seeing how they take the sounds of the giants of the past such as Genesis or Yes and provide a somewhat more modern spin on it, being able to recontextualise what originally made these artists great and demonstrate their own songwriting simultaneously. However, with that said, I often find myself becoming somewhat disappointed by the end result of this, feeling as if the artists hadn't really gone far enough in ensuring that their sound ends up being distinct from these older bands. This makes them often feel more like revelling in the past rather than demonstrating the next step in the genre's evolution. While this is completely fine, it's also something that I find makes these sorts of albums quite prone to becoming fairly inoffensive, this album being no exception to me, often hitting all the right marks for a competent album, but doing nothing that personally feels exciting in the same way as the bands it's inspired by.

In the case of Wobbler, the clearest influence on their sound is Yes, containing a lot of those more complex, expansive instrumental passages that are utilised both to showcase instrumental virtuosity, but also to build atmosphere and evoke often beautiful, lush imagery. This combined with the fact that the vocalist doesn't really sound like Jon Anderson, who I admittedly am not the biggest fan of, and you get an album that on paper sounds like an incredible album, even if to me, it's unfortunately not. The thing is, none of these individual songs are either completely lackluster nor particularly amazing, often finding a middle ground, being largely pleasant to listen to with a few moments of pure inspiration and greatness scattered through them, with the opening epic especially being prone to the slightly disjointed nature of each track. With that said, I'm a big fan of the opening few minutes of it, demonstrating some great interplay between the keyboards and bass to perfectly evoke that old, symphonic prog sound, with the more clean and modern production on top of it making it stand out excellently. While I'm very indifferent to the vocal melodies that follow this intro, the way the song builds is very well-executed here, with the late inclusion of the drums being able to gradually provide a more profound sense of urgency that carries onto a section that demonstrates talent, but lacks anything to really resonate with me personally. The song continues in this sort of trajectory for the rest of it, switching between more mellow, bland parts that have good ideas buried beneath them, and more intense sections that demonstrate the band in peak form. The moments that I especially love at around halfway through the song where it takes on a much darker tone reminiscent of the heavier intro section of PFM's Apenna un po', but much longer and with even further progression into heavier territory.

After the 2 minute interlude of Rendered in Shades of Green, the album picks up a bit with Fermented Hours, which while it embodies the qualities of the album which I like the least, with the inconsistency between the highlights of the tracks and the rest of it, the highlights end up being so good that it doesn't end up bothering me quite as much, knowing that I have those moments to look forward to to the point where I largely forgive the issues here. It would definitely be interesting to see the band go more frequently into this faster-paced, heavier direction, giving their music that bit of an edge that I personally think would go a long way in highlighting their strengths, and making those more mellow moments far more impactful. The main issue I end up having with this one is that I feel like it ends up not really going anywhere most of the time, and while the parts it has are largely very entertaining, I still wish there were a bit more to it, particularly in the climax of the song, which sounds too close to the intro to truly feel like the intense way to finish off the song. Foxlight focuses the hardest on these softer moments and ultimately suffers for it , not picking up much until 2 minutes in where the flute and clarinets help to provide some further musical depth and atmosphere. The other issue is that this suffers from the issue that I've noticed with quite a few prog bands when they attempt multi-sectioned epics, where the transitions from one part to the next end up feeling very sudden, feeling as if there wasn't sufficient build up to this shift in tone, approach etc., reducing how impactful they end up being.

Overall, I feel that while this album has its strengths, it's not really the sort of album that I feel like I can really get invested in, with a lot of dead air in between moments of greatness preventing these tracks to truly reach their full potential. I also still end up feeling indifferent to all but the greatest retro prog bands when they sound this close to their inspirations, despite the fact that they often end up having some great moments within. This album definitely showcases some serious talent and has a lot of individual parts that are truly great, especially whenever it hones in on the heavier moments where the amazing interplay between the elements of the band are at full display. Overall I would undoubtedly recommend this to fans of retro prog and symphonic prog in general, as I recognise the appeal of the album to avid fans of those genres, but for me, this was fairly run of the mill for the most part, with some excellent moments elevating this to one that I'd occasionally revisit, but not in much of a hurry at all.

Best tracks: Fermented Hours

Weakest tracks: Foxlight

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