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DELUGE GRANDER

Symphonic Prog • United States


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Deluge Grander picture
Deluge Grander biography
Formed in 2005 in Baltimore, Maryland, USA.

It was after Cerebus Effect's third release, Acts Of Deception that Dan Britton (keyboards, vocals and some guitars) approached Patrick Gaffney (drums) and suggested they form a new group together. Dan had been working on material of his own and wanted this new group to record this music he had composed and even play it live. They were joined by guitarist Dave Berggren who added to the repertoire and later on by Brett d'Anon who plays bass.

Their first album August In The Urals was released in September 2006 through the new label EMKOG. In this album they are joined by several guest musicians: Jeff Suzdal plays saxophones on the first track; Adnarim Dadelos performs the vocal on the last track; a special appearance is Brett d'Anon's uncle Frank d' Anon which is a mutli instrumentalist and on the album he plays on xylophone, trumpet, flute & keyboards on the first and last tracks and also contributed to the writing process.

This first release presents a softer sound than that of Cerebus Effect. Cerebus was labeled Canterbury Metal due to its eclectic style which employed use of elements from various musical genres such as the two mentioned above and the obvious fusion/jazz-rock basis. That same basis is also found on Deluge Grander, only this band has stripped itself from the metallic sounds and instead now incorporates a more symphonic rock based approach. Yes; you can even hear mellotron sounding keyboards on several tracks. The Canterburian sound has not been neglected as well and it is too revisited on certain occasions throughout the album. With all this said, the fusion basis of this band appears to be the strongest and most dominant sound here.
This release is a stroke of fresh air in the progressive rock "camp".

The flawless mixture that Deluge Grander presents is not only enjoyable to listen to, but also carries you away with its enthusiasm. Their music, while influenced by older bands of the aforementioned genres, is nevertheless a pleasure to hear and does not feel in any way like a rehash of the same thing; but rather creating an original sound that is the culmination of what is best from each style. Deluge Grander is from the Baltimore/DC area in the USA.

==Assaf Vestin (avestin)==

Deluge Grander official website

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OceanariumOceanarium
Emkog Records
Audio CD$12.99
The Form of the GoodThe Form of the Good
CD Baby 2016
Audio CD$9.99
$8.96 (used)
August in the UralsAugust in the Urals
Emkog 2006
Audio CD$20.00
$59.69 (used)
August in the Urals by Deluge Grander (2013-05-03)August in the Urals by Deluge Grander (2013-05-03)
Emkog
Audio CD$58.10
The Form of the Good by Deluge Grander (2012-05-04)The Form of the Good by Deluge Grander (2012-05-04)
Emkog
Audio CD$35.76
HeliotiansHeliotians
CD Baby 2014
Vinyl$55.98
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DELUGE GRANDER discography


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DELUGE GRANDER top albums (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

4.03 | 137 ratings
August In The Urals
2006
3.82 | 109 ratings
The Form Of The Good
2009
3.86 | 77 ratings
Heliotians
2014
4.35 | 16 ratings
Oceanarium
2017

DELUGE GRANDER Live Albums (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

DELUGE GRANDER Videos (DVD, Blu-ray, VHS etc)

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DELUGE GRANDER Reviews


Showing last 10 reviews only
 Oceanarium by DELUGE GRANDER album cover Studio Album, 2017
4.35 | 16 ratings

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Oceanarium
Deluge Grander Symphonic Prog

Review by Progfan97402

4 stars Oceanarium is the fourth installment by Deluge Grander from Maryland, a project lead by Dan Britton, also of Birds and Buildings and Cerebus Effect. This is the second in a trilogy, starting with Helotians, and ending with the as-yet-to-be-released Lunarians. Unlike Helotians, Oceanarium is an all-instrumental affair. This album really features a ton of diverse instruments, from the typical guitar, bass, drums, keyboards, to violin, cello, sax, trombone, flute, and clarinet, but doing it all in a symphonic prog context. What's really great is somehow they created an album that really reminds me of no band in particular. Sure I notice an influence from King Crimson, Canterbury, Camel, Genesis, perhaps, but never directly reminding me of such. The music is retro, so if you didn't know any better, you'd swear you were listening to a lost '70s recording. This is frequently dense and complex music, and given it's nearly 80 minutes long it really needs a few listens to let it all soak in. It's hard for me to point out a highlight, so I won't, but it's very much a worthy addition to your collection.
 Oceanarium by DELUGE GRANDER album cover Studio Album, 2017
4.35 | 16 ratings

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Oceanarium
Deluge Grander Symphonic Prog

Review by siLLy puPPy
Collaborator PSIKE & JR/F/Canterbury Teams

5 stars The word DELUGE is an English word that can mean a great flood, a heavy downpour or can mean to overrun or inundate. Dan Britton is back with his highly innovative symphonic prog band to bring us something even GRANDER than what came before. Yes, DELUGE GRANDER returns and living up to their name unleashes a veritable torrent of music in the form of the band's fourth full length album OCEANARIUM. While it may have seemed that Britton was playing back-and-forth with his two bands by releasing one album from one and then one from the next, it seems that the Birds And Buildings project has been put on hold while DELUGE GRANDER, well could get even GRANDER than anyone thought possible. As with the other three albums, OCEANARIUM is a dense and heavy ride through a sophisticated swirl of never-ending progginess that harkens back to the 70s in similar style and production, yet somehow feels very contemporary in the second decade of the 21st century with its grandiloquent larger-than-life elegance as it prances around like a symphonic prog pony on all those classic 70s albums and then back to the here and now.

OCEANARIUM follows the 2014 "Heliotians" as the second album in a 3-level 7-album series which purportedly will be followed by the album "Lunarians" open to the public possibly as early as 2018. While this middle section of the first level of an ongoing theme has much in common with the previous albums which came before, in sophistication and style, OCEANARIUM takes all of the attributes of a typical DELUGE GRANDER and creates a much denser and craftier manner of orchestrating the large number of instruments on board. Unlike the previous offerings, this one is exclusively instrumental without a vocal peep finding its way into the mix. There are eight tracks on board and are accompanied by stunning artwork in a lavishly designed packaging ( a 20-page full color booklet with artwork representing each track) with each track representing a stage of the loose concept that narrates a story about a rat-man who unluckily falls off of a building and into the lands of competing tribes and after fleeing from the conflicted areas only manages to become lost without the certainty of ever finding his way back to where he began.

While Dan Britton is the undisputed leader of this project, handles the keyboards, guitars and a plethora of other instruments, he is joined by Dave Berggon on guitar, Brett d'Anon on bass and guitars and Patrick Gaffney on percussion. While these guys have the chops to make a totally satisfying prog behemoth all by themselves, DELUGE GRANDER go for broke on OCEANARIUM with seven additional musicians lending a hand on trumpet, oboe, sax, flute, clarinet, bass clarinet, trombone, cello and violin. Although Britton is modest and doesn't want to include his long list of contributions as a multi-instrumentalist, also included on this album are the sitar, banjo, mandolin, ukulele, xylophone, hammered dulcimer, hand drums and oh yeah, can't forget about the tambourine! The density of OCEANARIUM is thicker than a uranium atom with enough radioactive zest to please even the most hardened of proggers as it feels as expansive as the Pacific melding with the Atlantic with no clear boundaries set between them but yet each segment still exuding its own personality in the nebulous mix.

Because of the fact that this album is so chock full of sounds and creative ideas, i solicited a bit of info regarding the storyline to aid as a training wheel for those of us who don't have the patience to unravel all the mysteries through countless listens. Here are a few comments about the eight tracks delivered to me by Dan Britton himself:

------------

Track 1 - "A Numbered Rat, a High Ledge, and a Maze of Horizons" [11:32]
 Heavy to symphonic to fusion to heavy

------------

Track 2 - "Drifting Inner Skyline Space" [8:28] Can (the Inner Space) meets Marillion (the Skyline Drifters), though perhaps only titularly

------------


Track 3 - "The Blunt Sun and the Hardened Moon" [15:25] Sun Ra and Moondog battle for the soul of Rat-Man

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Track 4 - "Finding a Valley in a Gray Area on a Map" [3:24] 
Track 5 - "Finding a Shipwreck in a Valley in an Ocean" [6:20] These two tracks were originally one 10-minute piece but were split to fit the album better onto two LPs

------------


Track 6 - "Tropical Detective Squadron" [14:10] The soundtrack to an imaginary cop show from the 1960's, 1970's, or 1980's

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Track 7 - "Marooned and Torn Asunder" [8:06] A combination of musical ideas from "Saruned" off Heliotians and "Torn Amoonder" off Lunarians

------------


Track 8 - "Water to Glass / The Ultimate Solution" [12:31] Inspired by the PFM album Per un Amico, especially the songs "Appena un Po" and "Per un Amico"

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Britton cites some of the usual 70s suspects as influences such as King Crimson and Genesis as obvious reference points but also found many lesser known bands as inspiration giving credit to artists as diverse as Kayo Dot, Kenso, Maneige, Miriodor, Semiramis, Asia Minor, Kotebel and Crucis. While it is obvious that some of the symphonic keyboard styles are derived from the Japanese band Kenso, the more bombastic rock heft can clearly be heard from the Spanish band Kotebel as well as the extra symphonic touches coming from many of the aforementioned and beyond. Personally i find OCEANARIUM and its narrations through music prospect reminds me the most of Pekka Pohjola's classic musical narrative on "Harakka Bialoipokku" as the music is the only form of explanation of emotional connection to the storyline at hand and like the late Finnish maestro's best efforts, DELUGE GRANDER effortlessly convey the emotional rollercoaster ride through the sophistication of the musical tapestry of sound alone.

One other influence not cited that immediately comes to mind for me as well is the sophisticated symphonic texturing approaches of the American band Happy The Man with their light and uplifting overall mood elevating effects. In the end, DELUGE GRANDER succeed in amalgamating all of the prog heroes who came before yet sound themselves like no other progressive rock band and display in vivid sonic form exactly how highly complex prog should be done in the 21st century while still firmly placed within the ongoing traditions already set during the heyday of the 70s. OCEANARIUM not only takes the band's compositional approach to a personal higher level but also ups the bar for symphonic prog section of prog in general. Even for a hardened proghead like me, this one was a dense and impenetrable experience on the first spin, but subsequent listens have allowed it to sink in on a deeper level of consciousness as well as taking in the countless passages that are sewn together like a royal cloak in the high court. Here we are in the year 2017 and a new classic is born somewhere in the tiny US state of Maryland. Bravissimo! Great job, guys! Looking forward to the continuing saga.

4.5 but prog this good needs to be rounded up here :)

 Oceanarium by DELUGE GRANDER album cover Studio Album, 2017
4.35 | 16 ratings

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Oceanarium
Deluge Grander Symphonic Prog

Review by LearsFool
Collaborator Post/Math Rock Team

4 stars "Oceanarium" finds both Deluge Grander and their listeners on a precipice. As it happens, the band place their wonderful limited edition 2014 album "Heliotians" at the start of a whole seven album series, with this release meant to be interrelated with both its predecessor and promised follow up "Lunarians". Exhibit A is the description of this album's "Marooned and Torn Asunder", which hearkens back to "Saruned" and apparently forwards to a track called "Torn Amoonder". Furthermore, there is an increasing amount of musical ingredients, with the group's Canterbury leanings becoming more apparent to the point of fusion, a return to some heavier moments last seen with Cerberus Effect, some violin use that reminds of David Cross era Crimson, and even use of banjo, mandolin, and hammered dulcimer. Appropriately enough with the band taking the plunge into ever more ambitious musicmaking, the hard- hitting opener "A Numbered Rat, A High Ledge, And A Maze of Horizons" is meant to invoke the image of a ratman tumbling down from some height to a world of strange landscapes, warring factions, some sort of battle of the bands between Sun Ra and Moondog, and TJ Hooker. Colour me intrigued.

Highlights include the aforementioned opener, which compares favourably with Haken's "The Mountain" and has some of the most jazzy moments on the record. As well, there's the somewhat Floydian "Drifting Inner Skyline Space", the split up piece made up of "Finding A Valley" and "Finding A Shipwreck", and the rambling "Tropical Detective Squadron". In general, the band create not just a nice symphonic soundscape, of which there are plenty every year, but one which mixes in influences and sounds that have been woefully uncommon in the symph revival. This release is one that symph lovers should be particularly excited for, offering new horizons both in the music itself and what the future holds.

 August In The Urals by DELUGE GRANDER album cover Studio Album, 2006
4.03 | 137 ratings

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August In The Urals
Deluge Grander Symphonic Prog

Review by poito

5 stars Difficult music. If you need a melody or a refrain to hook up with a song, this is not your band. But it is worth giving it a try. Deluge's music is no doubt a musical adventure, and everyone will get out with something interesting. This first release by Britton in Deluge's is a masterpiece of compositional work. Some themes are more experimental than others, but none is boring, they are highly dynamic with perfect blend of instruments all coming together for a unique orchestral experience, even some peculiar vocals are not in excess. Amongst the less risky are the album title track and the delicious A Squirrel. The musicianship is excellent, an obligatory asset to interpret such a complex music. I wouldn't dare to list any influences by specific groups or styles, so varied and eclectic is, without approaching jazz-rock fusion as it is often found in this type of bands that normally drink on Canterbury-Prog. The tracks are 8 to 25 min long, true major opus of modern music. The opening is also the longest track, in which you will begin to appreciate the impressive compositional skill and originality of the band, although the final 5 min could have been spared. The closing track is simply gorgeous, The Solitude of Miranda. Britton is a great of all times. Try to catch up with his music, you won't be sorry.
 The Form Of The Good by DELUGE GRANDER album cover Studio Album, 2009
3.82 | 109 ratings

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The Form Of The Good
Deluge Grander Symphonic Prog

Review by Prog Leviathan
Prog Reviewer

4 stars If you're interested in finding a highly musical prog-rock experience, it would be very challenging to do much better than Form of the Good, the second album by Deluge Grander. Dan Britton and company deliver us a symphonic prog album that practically overflows with musical ideas. This isn't symphonic prog in the vein of Flower Kings or Yes or some of the other key bands within this sub-genre; Deluge Grander is instrumental, highly composed, and intense music that will appeal to fans of Music (with a capital "M"). Casual listeners will probably be bored, but those of us that can appreciate the technical proficiency of the band's playing and the subtlety of the songwriting are in for a treat.

If you're familiar with Britton's various projects, Form of the Good should be a mandatory purchase. It isn't as intense as his Birds and Buildings band, or even the preceding Deluge Grander release. Form is richly textured and nuanced and unapologetic for its musical excesses. I'm very impressed by the maturity of composition; it feels like some lost symphonic work from an earlier time, transposed for a rock band. I wouldn't say that Britton is showing restraint, given the amount of sounds we hear, but it does feel that the negative space is used more effectively than before. The range of pitches and in the timbre between and within songs is huge, from the fat, bottom-heavy fuzz of the bass to the twittering woodwinds that come and go throughout. There is an amazing amount of variety here, so much in fact it may be too much, a common but fair bit of criticism for an album that commands your attention and respect, but doesn't necessarily want to remind you why you should return. For example, there aren't any soaring solo moments or memorable hooks to grab hold of ... just tons and tons and tons of music; it lets you do with it what you will.

Overall I highly recommend this album to prog-heads wanting something technical, instrumental, but with a personality that differs from the "normal" prog sound. Check out Form of the Good, and any of Brittons' other projects, for that matter!

Songwriting: 5 - Instrumental Performances: 4 - Lyrics/Vocals: NA - Style/Emotion/Replay: 3

 August In The Urals by DELUGE GRANDER album cover Studio Album, 2006
4.03 | 137 ratings

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August In The Urals
Deluge Grander Symphonic Prog

Review by Prog Leviathan
Prog Reviewer

4 stars August in the Urals is an ambitious blend of meticulously composed symphonic prog-rock and jazz fusion. Largely instrumental, Dan Britton and band bring their impressive songwriting and playing virtuosity with panache. Songs are extended and diverse, consisting of countless musical ideas that shift tempo, dynamics, and tone regularly. While in reality most of these ideas were probably stitched together in the studio, the result is a mature sound that feels organic. There is a ton of music to consume with this release, and it'll take a dedicated listener to discover them all!

First let's talk about the overall feel of August in the Urals. Throughout this album you'll hear a band recreating the "classic" prog sound better than most of the other throwback groups around today. There's something about the production that really captures a rawness that was heard frequently in the '70's. Nothing is overproduced, and there are no slick studio tricks; this really does sound the band is playing this stuff in one take and in unison, and it's very impressive. If you love to hear real musicianship in your music, you'll get an overwhelming amount of it with this album! Songs make no effort to create hooks memorable melodies; they are musical moments that move from one to the next, allowing you to take away what you will in the process.

Instrumentally the group is off the charts. They pull off ambitious compositions in what sounds like effortless proficiency. Britton's keyboards are varied and always doing something interesting. Bassist d'Anon plays very melodically, often with a fuzz distortion that gives moments of this album sound very Crimson-esque (from "Red" era). Berggren's guitars are very understated, sounding little like a typical rock player, but using restraint and enthusiasm when called for. He's at his best when playing in a classical style. Gaffney's drumming is unflappable as well, keeping up the time and melodies equally well. Though his kit sounds limited, the amount of sound and diversity he creates certainly isn't.

One of the few criticisms I have of this album's is the integration of Britton's vocals. He sings only on two tracks, and honestly, it's really difficult to tell if they're meant to be sarcastic or serious. There is a playfulness to the album that it really makes me wonder! Britton's voice is unabashedly simple, without much inflection or range. Most "normal" listeners will probably be turned off by it; for me, they drift in to the background. They aren't awful, but I'm not sure they strengthen the album. On the other hand, the lyrics are thoughtful and sensitive, so they get a pass for me.

If you're a fan of Britton's other projects, such as Birds and Buildings, you'll probably find August in the Urals very enjoyable and less intense. It's an approachable piece of symphonic prog for those who enjoy instrumentals most of all, and to be honest it's the record's slow and quite moments that I enjoyed most. That being said, while you can appreciate the artistry within, this album may not resonate with you as much as other works because so much of it's emotion comes from the subtlety of instruments. Still, a worthy purchase from one of the under appreciated artists in the prog community. Recommended!

Songwriting: 4 - Instrumental Performances: 5 - Lyrics/Vocals: 4 - Style/Emotion/Replay: 3

 Heliotians by DELUGE GRANDER album cover Studio Album, 2014
3.86 | 77 ratings

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Heliotians
Deluge Grander Symphonic Prog

Review by AdaCalegorn

5 stars Heliotians

As every project from Dan Briton's mind, Delunge Grander is not exactly a walk in the park. It defiant the listener, emerges as a whole, a gargantuan monster with a life of its own almost in the vein of Gentle Giant's most bizarre works. A sort of misunderstood beauty like Cthulhu's. It grows in you. And as well as with gentle Giant, Delunge Grander is one of those modern acts in prog rock that's clearly underestimated by far. In only three epic tracks, Briton's lead us into his solar world.

Just as the first sunrise of the day, the album 'dawns' with 'Ulterior'in a sort of somber light; soft, almost too thin, but that quickly grows and expand into its own complexity, the bass line drawing the ground while the keyboards and guitars spreads the light all around and a silver voice tries to lead, although despair but beautiful. With slow pace as pinkfloydian as kingcrimsonian marks the whole ambience before it explodes onto symphonic and strenuous with a range of influences from the classic styles a la ELP and Camel to a vigorous Änglagård's style as well as themselves (as Birds & Buildings), fading into a dense acoustic resolution.

'Saruned' works as an interlude. Smooth, light and energetic crosses paths within Genesis and King Crimson, flooding as an announcement of the war ahead. It vibrates over metallic percussion and vocals of ethereal laments. From time to time flirts with a more "new age" sound. But then again, drums saved the day.

On a well too influenced modern (Phieaux, Echolyn, Ayreon...) trace line, 'Reverse Solarity' spreads a multicolored peacock tail, eye's brushed in Zappa's tune and timber. The flight of this bird runs intense in perpetual motion, building a well-orchestrated journey in six movements, merging each into the other's hesitations. For the most, the track is bear by a tireless drums running unsparing almost breathless yet subtle and generous in textures. As in 'Ulterior' the keyboards paints the light in watercolors and push guitars and bass into a more chromatic experience. Flutes and violins poke out here and there balancing the voices in a solid direction. And as in the first track, an acoustic conclusion plagued on classical symphonic shades among a metal-opera female voice, rises with the sun and warming hearts over lovely torrid clouds.

Dan Briton walks back into all his influences and develops a wide winged project that push himself onto another level without forgetting his own trademark of somber still luminous atmospheres. Even when the instrumentations are mostly in vein of the seventies groups, there's an indubitable force from the nowadays, which only enriches further more. There are so few albums in the latter days as symphonic and challenging like this one. Every good progger should give it a listen? or two.

 The Form Of The Good by DELUGE GRANDER album cover Studio Album, 2009
3.82 | 109 ratings

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The Form Of The Good
Deluge Grander Symphonic Prog

Review by pfloyd

5 stars Dan Briton does it again.

Deluge Grander's second effort "Form of the good" is a brilliant and unique symphonic prog album. I would consider it slightly better than "August In the Urals." The songs seem to vary more with myriads of interesting subtle moments that prog fans love. The style has become more jazzy and avant garde giving it a bit more "flavor" while still keeping what we loved about the first album. Also, the production is much better quality. Basically, the band is just all around better. It is an album you have to be in a certain mood for though, as it is very heavy. You will probably want to take a nap, or rest your ears with some slow jazz after finishing this album.

"Before The common Era" is a great opening track that setups the rest of the album perfectly. An atmospheric piece with some awesome violin to complement the other instruments. "The Tree Factory" is the first epic of the album. There are just so many things happening in this song its hard to wrap your head around it, in a good way. It will take many listens to discover all the details hidden in layers of complexities. "Common Era Caveman" seems like it could be part of the previous song as they are very similar and equally as good, this one is just shorter. Admittedly, they are pretty much the same. "Aggrandizement" is the longest track on the album and features even more diverse elements than "Tree Factory." It is a very chaotic piece that goes through many ups and downs. My personal favorite track. "The Form of the good" Is a bit different from the other tracks. Its somewhat more simple, and ends the album very comfortably.

An improvement over the last album in nearly every way. Despite the lack of vocals, this an essential album, though I am hesitant to label it as a "Masterpiece" (but I have no doubt Deluge Grander is capable of one) . Epic, atmospheric songs with fantastic musicianship and lots of intricate compositions/melodies that flow well into each other. Its a very "meaty" album with no lazy filler songs. Every time i listen to this I discover something new. Compelling from start to finish.

4.5 stars.

 August In The Urals by DELUGE GRANDER album cover Studio Album, 2006
4.03 | 137 ratings

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August In The Urals
Deluge Grander Symphonic Prog

Review by infandous

4 stars 3 1/2 stars really.

Who would have imagined that there could be anything new and original in the symphonic prog sub-genre? Well, there is, and it's Deluge Grander.

Now, being honest, this is not quite in the category of "like nothing you've ever heard before". It is symph prog after all so the classical music influences lend a somewhat familiar overall sound. But these are mixed in with some fusion, some almost avant textures, and a healthy dose of zeuhl. The music is dense, multi layered, and even when there is repetition, it never really gets boring because the layers build and build, changing the foreground of the music while the background maintains the same structure (more or less). Anyway, that's the best description I can come up with at this point.

The opening epic, is quite a ride, with all sorts of interesting variations, sections, and diversions of themes. We are introduced to the (extremely) baritone vocals here, though they are minimal. While the vocals were a turn off to me on the first few listens, I've come to appreciate them as they are not bad at all. I think that the issue really is that most people are not used to such extremely low register singing. In the case of this track, they fit the mood and feel of the sections they are in perfectly, and so are at their finest here.

Second track, August in the Urals features the most vocals of the whole album, and as such was my least favorite early on. Now, however, I find that I can appreciate them, if not love them on this track. The music itself is somewhat more "conventional" I guess, in that the song has a much more immediately identifiable structure than other songs on the album and seems a bit less dense and "busy" (though towards the end it gets back to this).

Abandoned Mansion Afternoon is quite a good track, again featuring vocals, but a bit less than the previous track.

The last two tracks are completely instrumental and probably still my favorites on the album. The playing is quite good, with some intense flamenco type playing and melodies on the final track making for a quite satisfying conclusion to the album.

Overall, an excellent piece of work, and something interesting in a quite bloated sub-genre. Honestly, I don't think any of this can be compared to other symph prog bands. While there are influences that can be discerned here and there, it really isn't your typical retro prog album, though the instrumentation and approach is more 70's than modern..........though even that statement is not exactly true. A unique work, that I rate at about 3 1/2 stars, the half star being subtracted due to the rather muddy production values. I'll round up for the archives,but I'd say it's not quite a 4 star album.

Anyway, if you want some truly original symphonic prog, this is the place to go.

 August In The Urals by DELUGE GRANDER album cover Studio Album, 2006
4.03 | 137 ratings

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August In The Urals
Deluge Grander Symphonic Prog

Review by ProgShine
Collaborator Errors & Omissions Team

4 stars What we have here? A great symphonic album that comes from USA? Yeah, that's right!

Well, I'm not used to listen Symphonic rock albums from USA, so, for me, it's quite a big surprise, specially because it's a very good one!

I've heard about Deluge Grander when I bought my copy of the DVD Romantic Warriors (which, by the way, is a great Prog Rock documentary). And I was really curious, so I started with a copy from their first album, the 2006's August In The Urals.

The man behind the band is Dan Britton (composer, keyboards, vocals and guitars), and maybe the production isn't that great (well, it's the first release from his own label Emkog and independent at the same time), but that don't affect really the overall sound. My only complaint is about the vocals, I do think they're good, a kind of spoken voice style, but they're way far too 'hidden' on background. It should be on front, that would make the music even more relevant.

All in all August In The Urals have some great symphonic passages, keyboard driven (good ones, not that kind of 90's prog rock comeback stolen from Pink Floyd's The Division Beall that I always disliked).

5 tunes on the album, 2 of them with more than 12 minutes long and a big opening track: 'Inaugural Bash' with 26.

Deluge Grander have 2 albums, the second one, 2009's The Form Of The Good I have to pick it up yet, hope they fixed the vocal thing, cause if they did, it's probably a great record.

Thanks to avestin for the artist addition. and to Quinino for the last updates

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