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DELUGE GRANDER

Symphonic Prog • United States


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Deluge Grander picture
Deluge Grander biography
Formed in 2005 in Baltimore, Maryland, USA.

It was after Cerebus Effect's third release, Acts Of Deception that Dan Britton (keyboards, vocals and some guitars) approached Patrick Gaffney (drums) and suggested they form a new group together. Dan had been working on material of his own and wanted this new group to record this music he had composed and even play it live. They were joined by guitarist Dave Berggren who added to the repertoire and later on by Brett d'Anon who plays bass.

Their first album August In The Urals was released in September 2006 through the new label EMKOG. In this album they are joined by several guest musicians: Jeff Suzdal plays saxophones on the first track; Adnarim Dadelos performs the vocal on the last track; a special appearance is Brett d'Anon's uncle Frank d' Anon which is a mutli instrumentalist and on the album he plays on xylophone, trumpet, flute & keyboards on the first and last tracks and also contributed to the writing process.

This first release presents a softer sound than that of Cerebus Effect. Cerebus was labeled Canterbury Metal due to its eclectic style which employed use of elements from various musical genres such as the two mentioned above and the obvious fusion/jazz-rock basis. That same basis is also found on Deluge Grander, only this band has stripped itself from the metallic sounds and instead now incorporates a more symphonic rock based approach. Yes; you can even hear mellotron sounding keyboards on several tracks. The Canterburian sound has not been neglected as well and it is too revisited on certain occasions throughout the album. With all this said, the fusion basis of this band appears to be the strongest and most dominant sound here.
This release is a stroke of fresh air in the progressive rock "camp".

The flawless mixture that Deluge Grander presents is not only enjoyable to listen to, but also carries you away with its enthusiasm. Their music, while influenced by older bands of the aforementioned genres, is nevertheless a pleasure to hear and does not feel in any way like a rehash of the same thing; but rather creating an original sound that is the culmination of what is best from each style. Deluge Grander is from the Baltimore/DC area in the USA.

==Assaf Vestin (avestin)==

Deluge Grander official website

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Buy DELUGE GRANDER Music


OceanariumOceanarium
Emkog Records
Audio CD$12.99
$17.99 (used)
The Form of the GoodThe Form of the Good
CD Baby 2016
Audio CD$9.99
$8.96 (used)
August in the UralsAugust in the Urals
Emkog 2006
Audio CD$20.00
HeliotiansHeliotians
CD Baby 2014
Vinyl$34.53
August in the Urals by Deluge Grander (2013-05-03)August in the Urals by Deluge Grander (2013-05-03)
Emkog
Audio CD$57.59
The Form of the Good by Deluge Grander (2012-05-04)The Form of the Good by Deluge Grander (2012-05-04)
Emkog
Audio CD$35.75
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DELUGE GRANDER discography


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DELUGE GRANDER top albums (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

4.04 | 146 ratings
August In The Urals
2006
3.83 | 118 ratings
The Form Of The Good
2009
3.88 | 87 ratings
Heliotians
2014
3.90 | 77 ratings
Oceanarium
2017

DELUGE GRANDER Live Albums (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

DELUGE GRANDER Videos (DVD, Blu-ray, VHS etc)

DELUGE GRANDER Boxset & Compilations (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

DELUGE GRANDER Official Singles, EPs, Fan Club & Promo (CD, EP/LP, MC, Digital Media Download)

DELUGE GRANDER Reviews


Showing last 10 reviews only
 The Form Of The Good by DELUGE GRANDER album cover Studio Album, 2009
3.83 | 118 ratings

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The Form Of The Good
Deluge Grander Symphonic Prog

Review by siLLy puPPy
Collaborator PSIKE & JR/F/Canterbury Teams

4 stars After getting his feet wet on his debut album "August In The Urals" after leaving Cerebrus Effect, Dan Britton took another few years to craft another batch of complex compositions that take the symphonic prog realm to new unthinkable heights. Just as on the debut album DELUGE GRANDER dishes out a new stranger batch of progressive rock tunes on the second album THE FORM OF THE GOOD that seem to borrow as much from Western classical artists as it does from the symphonic prog greats. Once again, the album is mostly instrumental with a loose sort of concept that tells a story about humanity through music and art instead of lyrical content. The concept is also depicted on the album cover of how people disagree and end up taking their journeys in opposite directions but eventually come full circle and arrive at the same destination. Once again, this nebulous concept escapes me but is hardly required to enjoy the music. There are five tracks on THE FORM OF THE GOOD that are quite distinct with the longest stretching over the nineteen minute mark.

Starting things off is the bizarre little "Before The Common Era," which is the shortest and easiest track to digest. It is the least meandering of the bunch and incorporates some gorgeous Gregorian chanting accompanied by an easy catchy piano riff with lots of samples of violins that add an extra layer of melancholy. The symphonic effects are in full display with brilliant sweeps of keyboards. The chants remain somewhat subdued under the symphonic elements which adds a rather murky and mysterious sort of tune but one that sets a tone and allows the listener to calibrate to the overall mood before diving into the larger complexities that follow.

"The Tree Factory" is the second longest track which takes its cue from the debut release and shows how DELUGE GRANDER has grown as a band and how Britton has indulged his wildest prog fantasies and nurtured them into extreme pomp and awe. The secret to understanding these longer tracks such as this one is to understand that what may seem like lengthy meandering and aimless noodling is actually more like a progressive medley of sampling different classical albums that range from Penderecki to Varse and beyond and then set to symphonic progressive rock instrumentation. Generally speaking, segments are allowed to develop melodies before changing things up to another seemingly completely different motif. Some of these segments stay soft and play the symphonic card in full regalia and other segments just simply rock out with heavy guitar, bouncy bass and drum bombast and even include sizzling lead guitar solos. Tracks like this display the mind of a music nerd and how these types think in music where one idea simply cedes to another.

"Common Era Caveman" is somewhat of a breather between the two behemoths of the album and a lot easier on the ears. Composed of a mere two chords, this one has a busy bass line played on the electric piano with the skillful drumming prowess of Patrick Gaffney showing how he can keep up with the most unorthodox of time signature deviations. While being a simple composition in many ways, the progressive features are let off the leash with heavy jazzy brass embellishments and jittery time sigs jolting in different directions. Dave Berggren also dishes out some of the heaviest guitar riffs on this track which makes this one more of the rocker and as a change subduing the keyboards to subordination however the ambience and atmospheric additions give this one a true eerie feeling while the heavier parts bounce along.

"Aggrandizement" is the monster track of the album that dips over the nineteen minute mark and runs the gamut of prog workouts. While starting out with a rather exotic Middle-Eastern sort of flair, it shifts fairly quickly to the symphonic elements that wend and wind it through a series of changes that include time signature shake ups, dynamic and tempo deviations and the multitude of classically tinged melodies that meander aimlessly through the never-ending tunnel of music. This is the type of complexity that proggy dreams are made of as all progressive elements are fully employed and although once segments are completed and rarely return for reprises, are still quite the satisfying albeit adventurous listening experience. This track included lyrics when played at Progday in Chapel Hill, NC and at Orion in Baltimore in 2009. The lyrics were implemented to try to make the live experience a little more audience interactive as this kind of stuff can be a little abstract. The lyrical accoutrements were included on the Progday performance in the film "Romantic Warriors." It's amazing to me that i can sit through this one and never get bored wondering how long it lasts. On the contrary i'm consistently amazed how many ideas are packed into this one. More than most albums by lesser talents.

The title track ends the dense layer of movements that makes up THE FORM OF THE GOOD and at a mere 8 minutes and 40 seconds is the second shortest track on the album. Britton says that he was subconsciously mimicking PFM's "L'Isola di Niente" with a grand bombastic intro that ratchets up the symphonic aspects while the staccato guitar riffs add a heft supplied by the great Italian symphonic prog artists of the 70s complete with the Genesis inspired pastural atmospheric developments. Perhaps the mellowest track after the intro, it track shapeshifts as it evolves with droning synth sounds in the background allowing the musical caterpillar crawl of the guitar, bass and percussion to slowly gain in dynamics and tempo. While the album is divided into a gazillion subsections that don't repeat, the album closes with the last 30 seconds from the opening track "Before The Common Era" which closes the long and lengthy loop which is exactly what the concept of the album is about.

THE FORM OF THE GOOD is an ambitious project to say the least taking symphonic progressive rock into completely nerdy arenas and is somewhat the math rock version of that particular subgenre. While heavily steeped in classical music tradition, the jittery time signature deviations and dynamic shifts keep this one a guessing game as to where any particular section of the tracks may be heading. While some may call this aimless and rather pointless as it doesn't have any sort of traditional patterns to latch onto, i find this stuff to be exhilarating since the music is so layered and steeped in complexities that no matter how many times one listens to this it always sounds new in some ways. DELUGE GRANDER may have created a hard nut to crack in terms of nebulous concepts carried out in grandiose musical parades in any particular direction but somehow each segment that connects to the following sounds as if its a mini-suite of some sort that does feel logical even if it sounds like it's unrelated. The whole thing comes off as more intuitively based than stodgily cranked out on paper. The production of the album is impressive as so many subtle sounds dance around the other and create an interesting tapestry effect that makes DELUGE GRANDER sound like absolutely no other progressive band on the scene. Personally i find this kind of stuff a form of intelligent design that is reserved for those moments when i can't get enough complexity in my prog.

 Oceanarium by DELUGE GRANDER album cover Studio Album, 2017
3.90 | 77 ratings

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Oceanarium
Deluge Grander Symphonic Prog

Review by kev rowland
Special Collaborator Crossover Prog Team

4 stars This is the fourth album from Deluge Grander, but it is the first time I have come across them. To be honest, if it wasn't for bandleader Dan Britton (keyboards, guitars, other instruments) contacting me through both ProgArchives and LastFM, I still wouldn't have! But, I personally think it is great when musicians push themselves out there to people who may be interested, so I was intrigued to hear this. Joining him on this album is Brett d'Anon (bass, guitar) and Patrick Gaffney on drums along with assorted guests, and by having certain instruments only involved with certain songs it gives the music an incredibly varied feel.

I have seen some people liken this to Mike Oldfield, but that isn't at all fair on either artist, and doesn't represent what the music is like, as for me this is what would have happened if Frank Zappa had moved more into the symphonic progressive field as opposed to the avant garde. There are times when the music becomes almost oriental, and I found myself thinking of Dennis Rea and his incredible 'Views From Chicheng Precipice', but again brought more into mainstream progressive music. Dan's keyboards are always at the very heart of this instrumental album, and here the music really does live up to the album title as when playing this I can envisage myself underwater following fish near the seabed.

Due to the variety of sounds and instruments, one doesn't always know what to expect around the next coral reef or valley in the sea floor, which makes the album consistently interesting and enjoyable. I did warn Dan that if he sent me the album he had to understand that it would be reviewed honestly, and I would say exactly what I thought, which may not be what he wanted. But, he accepted that, but from the moment I put this on I knew that it was never going to be an issue, as this is one that I have enjoyed throughout. Well worth further investigation.

 Oceanarium by DELUGE GRANDER album cover Studio Album, 2017
3.90 | 77 ratings

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Oceanarium
Deluge Grander Symphonic Prog

Review by Mellotron Storm
Prog Reviewer

3 stars This really comes across as a homage to Mike Oldfield, and unfortunately for me I'm not a big Oldfield fan. As highly as this has been rated by the majority there's little here that does anything for me. This just isn't my kind of music. Should have sampled it first. I still get a kick out of the fact the drummer here is Patrick Gaffney who I knew from his CHAOS CODE days, loved that band. Anyway Patrick has played on a number of Dan Britton projects. The album cover is one of my favourites from this year, so there's that. DELUGE GRANDER is pretty much a trio with many guests helping out. I believe there are 8 musicians helping out here playing a variety of horns and strings mostly. 80 minutes of music!

"A Numbered Rat, A High Ledge, And A Maze Of Horizons" hits the ground running after a pause. The guitar isn't in the style I like and the synths are high pitched which I also am not into(haha). Is that harmonica? Anyway the song has many tempo shifts with lots of guitar, piano, synths and drums. The calm starting before 3 minutes features trombone and bass with the piano to follow. Oboe 6 1/2 minutes in then guitar to the fore after 7 minutes.

"Drifting Inner Skyline Space" has a relaxed sound to it with a slow beat. Cello helps out along with the bass and more. I like it best after 7 minutes where we get some space with electric piano, bass clarinet, cello, guitar and more. It then picks up again.

"The Blunt Sun And The Hardened Moon" is uptempo with sax over top. High pitched synths replace the sax unfortunately then a brief calm before 2 minutes. The sax is back around 3 1/2 minutes. The sound might be at it's heaviest on this album before 5 minutes, and it's not heavy. The piano leads before 5 1/2 minutes. I'm not into the lighter sound that follows a minute later. I do like the sound before 9 minutes though and we get what sounds like mellotron that follows. Back to that uptempo sound before it settles back before 13 minutes to the end.

"Finding A Valley In A Grey Area In A Map" is a song I like early on with the bass and flute. Violin before a minute and the piano is fairly prominent at times. An Eastern vibe before 3 minutes then it picks up in pace.

"Finding A Shipwreck In A valley In An Ocean" opens with bass and piano, kind of jazzy actually. It becomes catchy with violin helping out. The music swells after 5 minutes.

"Tropical Detective Squadron" has a light and humerous sound to begin with. Again the high pitched sounds are prominent that bug me throughout. I really like when it turns darker before 3 1/2 minutes, a nice change. Sounds like mellotron, electric piano and a beat that follows. So good! The high pitched sounds are back changing the mood.

"Marooned And Torn Asunder" opens with oboe and other intricate sounds. Guitar too. Oboe to the fore after 2 1/2 minutes as it settles. Beautiful stuff. Nice guitar melodies before 4 minutes then more oboe. The guitar after 5 1/2 minutes goes on and on.

"Water To Glass/ The Ultimate Solution" is majestic sounding with piano and horns early on. Strings too, then eventually after 4 minutes it's piano only but atmosphere, oboe and more follow in this mellow section. We get some Oldfield styled guitar coming and going on this one especially after 5 1/2 minutes. Lots of piano before 8 1/2 minutes and cello around 10 minutes.

Clearly a grand work for Dan Britton. I can't even imagine the work that went into this. Bottom line though is that I'm just not into this style of music.

 Oceanarium by DELUGE GRANDER album cover Studio Album, 2017
3.90 | 77 ratings

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Oceanarium
Deluge Grander Symphonic Prog

Review by snelling

5 stars Wow, this came as quite a surprise. I admit I wasn't terribly familiar with Deluge Grander prior to "Oceanarium", or Dan Britton's other projects, but that is now changing. First off, I love that this is all instrumental. More and more I'm gravitating to instrumental music, especially when it sounds like this. Musically this is a plethora of influences, from Mike Oldfield (Amarok style), Bo Hansson, King Crimson and Tony Banks (instrumental side), with scatterings of Canterbury and 60s spy music thrown in for good measure. All of this is in very small degree however, as the overall sound and approach is quite original, with original, beautiful melodies and intriguingly appealing chord changes. This is one of those albums where every note counts, lending itself to great writing, and if one doesn't like a particular section, 15 seconds later it will be different. I love that, as the music keeps changing and morphing, and never grows tiresome. 77 minutes of music. And not a bit of filler!
 Oceanarium by DELUGE GRANDER album cover Studio Album, 2017
3.90 | 77 ratings

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Oceanarium
Deluge Grander Symphonic Prog

Review by BrufordFreak
Collaborator Jazz-Rock / Fusion / Canterbury Team

3 stars An album of oddly recorded instruments (everything muted, compressed, or dampened at the high end?) composed in a style that sounds like the pretentiousness of a 1970s soundtrack to a porno film. The whole time I'm listening to this album I feel as if it's 1970 and I'm sitting in a basement practice studio in Poughkeepskie, New York, or Waterloo, Iowa, listening to the local Symphony Orchestra run through a rehearsal of a locally produced rock opera that was composed in the by some local who is heavily inspired by Mike Oldfield. Weird. Though almost every song on the album has interesting and enjoyable parts, section, themes, or performances, no song is fully satisfying start to finish. Is Dan trying to have his music sound like it came from a 78 rpm recording from the 1920s?

1. "A Numbered Rat, A High Ledge, And A Maze Of Horizons" (11:32) opens with a bit of an ELP flare before going symphonic X-Files, Spaghetti Western, and Karda Estra. (8.5/10)

2. "Drifting Inner Skyline Space" (8:28) Sounds like a Sergio Leone-George Martin lovefest--until Mike Oldfield and John Barry (Midnight Cowboy) squeeze their way in. (8.5/10)

3. "The Blunt Sun And The Hardened Moon" (15:25) Hawkwind meets Sergio Leone. Nothing new here. (7.5/10)

4. "Finding A Valley In A Gray Area On A Map" (3:24) Unfulfilled portentousness. (7.5/10)

5. "Finding A Shipwreck In A Valley In An Ocean" (6:20) Aimless and meandering. (7/10)

6. "Tropical Detective Squadron" (14:10) Seriously?! This must be the "tension reliever"? or from the Steven King comedy soundtrack. (6.5/10)

7. "Marooned And Torn Asunder" (8:06) one of the three best songs on the album--even if it is a Mike Oldfield ripoff. (8.5/10)

8. "Water To Glass / The Ultimate Solution" (12:31) What is the point to stringing together all these odd, unusual, and incongruous themes? Showing off the disconnected wanderings of an ADHD mind? (7.5/10)

While Dan is obviously an accomplished musician and mature composer, I wonder about his sound sensibilities as there has never been a release that he's been associated with that has what is in my opinion "good" sound. (I have my own standards, of course). What is meant when contributing artists are credited with "other instruments" and "compositional contributions" (Dan Berggren, Patrick Gaffney, and Christopher West)? Is it all composed on GarageBand?

3.5 stars; interesting but "unfinished"?or "unpolished."

 August In The Urals by DELUGE GRANDER album cover Studio Album, 2006
4.04 | 146 ratings

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August In The Urals
Deluge Grander Symphonic Prog

Review by siLLy puPPy
Collaborator PSIKE & JR/F/Canterbury Teams

4 stars OK, i have to admit that my mind is in the gutter because every time i read this title it translates as "August In The Urinals" which makes me think of unthinkable stinkiness on the streets of San Francisco freshly excreted by the burgeoning homeless population. But wait! I digress before i even get started! Thankfully when Dan Britton left Cerebrus Effect, he didn't waste any time taking his passion for progressive oriented rock and taking it to the moon and back and this album in reality is the exact antithesis of that misconstrued mistranslation. The debut album by DELUGE GRANDER is a triumph in the one, two punch that the 90s provided in the prog revival scene with bands such as Anglagard and Dream Theater leading the way. The correct title of the album, ah hem, is AUGUST IN THE URALS and debuted in 2006 but despite its release well into the 21st century, this band was in love with not only the usual suspects of the past but also the lesser known prog acts such as Cathedral, Kenso, Maneige, Miriodor, Semiramis, Asia Minor, Kotebel and Crucis. This rich palette of influences gives this music a true classic feel although the complexity meter is turned up to 11 and counting.

Britton explains that the DELUGE GRANDER debut album was a work of passion that lasted 8 months right after he finished grad school and before he found full employment. Inspiration occurred in the sleepless cycles where he would labor away in 26 to 30 hour cycles and catch a nap whenever time would permit. This frame of mind in this period of his life explains the labor of love which resulted in a staggeringly complex behemoth of prog that nearly hits the 71 minute mark. While this was the period of time when Britton admits he didn't have a lot of musical equipment and even incorporated on this album an old analog Univox synthesizer that he found lying outside his apartment complex all covered in snow. While the money and equipment may have been in short supply, the passion and inspiration were clearly not lacking. This is the type of album where every single stroke of the key and pluck of the string is cleverly crafted and adroitly animated in a serious never-ending stream into the prog universe.

The album begins with the monstrosity near 27 minute long "Inaugural Bash" which slowly begins with a simple keyboard and guitar riff that ratchet their way into a complex web of sonic subtleties and compositional prowess that ebbs and flows like a never-ending stream wending its way through a lush verdant vale in some bucolic setting. This piece is mostly instrumental with only scant few vocals poking out of the moody mist of layered synthesizers and irregular time signature workouts with bass and drum marching along like a jazz-addicted clown on Bourbon Street in New Orleans after a few drinky-poos circulating in the old blood stream. While the grooves and melodies are all over the place, there are some that recur for an anchoring effect but mostly, this one drifts off in a musical march that takes you on a ride that you never want to disembark. The title track is only about half as long but still at a near 16 minute time run is another prog behemoth that continues the symphonic bombast with tender and heart-felt melodies fluttering into your ears and directly into your center of prog sensibilities. This one has a lot of interesting guitar workouts performed by Dave Berggren that are sort of flamenco-esque yet very unique and frenetically displaying a rotisserie of complex time signature workouts. While musically this is another beauty of a prog standard on steroids, one of the weakness of the band occurs with Britton's vocals much like the same style of vocal tracks on his debut Birds and Buildings album. While not unlistenable in the vocal department, the style seems to be substandard for the type of vocals that such dynamic music seems to be calling for. Nevertheless, the title track is another winner of proggy yumminess guaranteed to win a high place in the prog museum on that far away world that only exists in a Roger Dean album cover.

The third track "Abandoned Mansion Afternoon" is yet another behemoth track that slightly exceeds the 12 minute mark and ushers in yet more moody symphonic laden prog rock workouts that shuffle time sigs, dynamics and tempos into a mystifying blender of spits them out in incremental deliveries. This is another vocal track that sounds most like the title track with Britton's baritone and detached sounding vocals that cruise along in a rather monotonous manner residing on a lower octave. The quirky bass lines and guitar riffs meander and wander aimlessly at times into completely new pastures but always result in extremely precise and bizarre instrumental interplay. The final two tracks "A Squirrel" and "The Solitude Of Miranda" are all instrumental and show more varied tempos with emphasis on some of the more energetic passages on the album. Without the vocals keeping them on the leash, the individual instruments are allowed to run free range and conjure up whatever mojo they can muster up and with keyboard riffs run amok, bass slaps and guitars whizzing up and down the scales, we get a satisfying ending of prog workouts to end the album.

AUGUST IN THE URALS is a contumacious display of unbridled prog that knows no limitations and provides the utmost efficacious pomp and awe that many a modern act is incapable of dishing out in such lofty doses. This is one of those albums that is just so grand in scope that its intransigent serpentine flow of ambitiousness will surely leave even the most hardened progger having to gasp for air. While the melodies and grooves are rather airy and light-hearted, there are just so many twists and turns that it's almost impossible to grasp upon first listen. This is one truly for those who love it dense and complex as possible and in that regard DELUGE GRANDER deliver the goods in an unapologetic procedure of symphonic prog overload. This is exactly the type of music that floats my boat the most. This is a brilliant album slightly bogged down only by the vocal parts that don't do the music justice but even on those parts, AUGUST IN THE URALS is a splendidly well constructed album that displays all the passion and devotion that went into it. Excellent debut!

 Oceanarium by DELUGE GRANDER album cover Studio Album, 2017
3.90 | 77 ratings

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Oceanarium
Deluge Grander Symphonic Prog

Review by tmay102436

4 stars "Oceanarium" is a new release from a group - Deluge Grander, that I wasn't really familiar with up until this current offering. I have sort of grown away from instrumental progressive music, leaning more to vocal laced prog. Along with this, I also have really strayed away from lengthy albums.

So, going into this listening of something that should add up to not enjoyable, I was cautious.

NO NEED! This is Very Impressive!

There's a lot to take in, but not hard to sit and listen through the entire (almost 80 minutes) album. I have also listened to this in the car, while driving to work, and it equally was compelling. The motif's are quite well introduced, disguised, and returned to without heroics (in fact, I which there were more heroics if anything.) With all of the other fine reviews, some discussing each song, I will not go into great detail, but state that Deluge Grander have created a lovely combination of ideas / influences. In fact I hear some obvious Canterbury hints, but still with an American feel. I couldn't help but think of the very underappreciated USA group Fireballet's first release at times.

Through the information provided, and other reviewers comments, I understand that this is a part of a larger grouping / work. I must "look back" and purchase their previous works to get "caught up." As Deluge Grander have wet my appetite, that now needs satisfied.

Bravo Deluge Grander, your "Oceanarium" is an artful success!

 Oceanarium by DELUGE GRANDER album cover Studio Album, 2017
3.90 | 77 ratings

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Oceanarium
Deluge Grander Symphonic Prog

Review by daFigz

4 stars Silver Springs, MD Progressive Rock band, Deluge Grander has recently released a brilliant Prog instrumental LP, titled, 'Oceanarium' showcasing exceptional musicality with a special nod to band member Dan Britton for his outstanding compositional prowess throughout its eight tracks and stellar musicianship behind the keyboard.

Most notable is the arrangement of the four extended tracks which are filled with gorgeous, harmonic texture and in their respective complexity draws the listener right along as time signatures change and the nuances of each composition reveal wonderful elements of classical and jazz phrasing without coming off schmaltzy. By example, track six, titled, 'Tropical Detective Squadron' launches itself in upbeat rhythm when suddenly nearing the midpoint a more brooding tempo is displayed leading you along a journey that by midway, finds that you're fully engaged as Neil Brown's trumpet part begins to unfold. Dan Britton's stellar keyboards add to the fluidity of this track throughout and are heard upfront when it's most important to showcase its contribution. Gradually, as the track builds momentum in preparation for its crescendo the listener is treated to a well-placed shift in time signature which extends the exhilaration of this song. Adding Dave Berggren's subtle electric guitar work towards the finish amounts to nothing short of exceptional to say the least! This is smart and accomplished music to be sure.

Here's my suggestion: Deluge Grander proves itself on 'Oceanarium' as possessing the right balance of nuanced musicality and superbly crafted composition in the context of true Progressive Rock music. 'Oceanarium' is a fresh, intelligent and accomplished project, of which Dan Britton, in particular, has demonstrated his skill as a composer and highly skilled musician. The LP is available as a digital download via Bandcamp. Amazon offers both MP3 and CD items. CD Baby too, is a great choice to hear, and learn more about this terrific band or, to simply/supportively purchase the release. Lastly, while not in US public libraries at present, most libraries offer a 'suggest a purchase' service so, like I often say, exploit the service as a means to gain access to new music! With a promise of delivering another LP in 2018 titled, 'Lunarians' fans old and new certainly have another reason to stay tuned. Cheers.

 Oceanarium by DELUGE GRANDER album cover Studio Album, 2017
3.90 | 77 ratings

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Oceanarium
Deluge Grander Symphonic Prog

Review by Progfan97402

4 stars Oceanarium is the fourth installment by Deluge Grander from Maryland, a project lead by Dan Britton, also of Birds and Buildings and Cerebus Effect. This is the second in a trilogy, starting with Helotians, and ending with the as-yet-to-be-released Lunarians. Unlike Helotians, Oceanarium is an all-instrumental affair. This album really features a ton of diverse instruments, from the typical guitar, bass, drums, keyboards, to violin, cello, sax, trombone, flute, and clarinet, but doing it all in a symphonic prog context. What's really great is somehow they created an album that really reminds me of no band in particular. Sure I notice an influence from King Crimson, Canterbury, Camel, Genesis, perhaps, but never directly reminding me of such. The music is retro, so if you didn't know any better, you'd swear you were listening to a lost '70s recording. This is frequently dense and complex music, and given it's nearly 80 minutes long it really needs a few listens to let it all soak in. It's hard for me to point out a highlight, so I won't, but it's very much a worthy addition to your collection.
 Oceanarium by DELUGE GRANDER album cover Studio Album, 2017
3.90 | 77 ratings

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Oceanarium
Deluge Grander Symphonic Prog

Review by siLLy puPPy
Collaborator PSIKE & JR/F/Canterbury Teams

5 stars The word DELUGE is an English word that can mean a great flood, a heavy downpour or can mean to overrun or inundate. Dan Britton is back with his highly innovative symphonic prog band to bring us something even GRANDER than what came before. Yes, DELUGE GRANDER returns and living up to their name unleashes a veritable torrent of music in the form of the band's fourth full length album OCEANARIUM. While it may have seemed that Britton was playing back-and-forth with his two bands by releasing one album from one and then one from the next, it seems that the Birds And Buildings project has been put on hold while DELUGE GRANDER, well could get even GRANDER than anyone thought possible. As with the other three albums, OCEANARIUM is a dense and heavy ride through a sophisticated swirl of never-ending progginess that harkens back to the 70s in similar style and production, yet somehow feels very contemporary in the second decade of the 21st century with its grandiloquent larger-than-life elegance as it prances around like a symphonic prog pony on all those classic 70s albums and then back to the here and now.

OCEANARIUM follows the 2014 "Heliotians" as the second album in a 3-level 7-album series which purportedly will be followed by the album "Lunarians" open to the public possibly as early as 2018. While this middle section of the first level of an ongoing theme has much in common with the previous albums which came before, in sophistication and style, OCEANARIUM takes all of the attributes of a typical DELUGE GRANDER and creates a much denser and craftier manner of orchestrating the large number of instruments on board. Unlike the previous offerings, this one is exclusively instrumental without a vocal peep finding its way into the mix. There are eight tracks on board and are accompanied by stunning artwork in a lavishly designed packaging ( a 20-page full color booklet with artwork representing each track) with each track representing a stage of the loose concept that narrates a story about a rat-man who unluckily falls off of a building and into the lands of competing tribes and after fleeing from the conflicted areas only manages to become lost without the certainty of ever finding his way back to where he began.

While Dan Britton is the undisputed leader of this project, handles the keyboards, guitars and a plethora of other instruments, he is joined by Dave Berggon on guitar, Brett d'Anon on bass and guitars and Patrick Gaffney on percussion. While these guys have the chops to make a totally satisfying prog behemoth all by themselves, DELUGE GRANDER go for broke on OCEANARIUM with seven additional musicians lending a hand on trumpet, oboe, sax, flute, clarinet, bass clarinet, trombone, cello and violin. Although Britton is modest and doesn't want to include his long list of contributions as a multi-instrumentalist, also included on this album are the sitar, banjo, mandolin, ukulele, xylophone, hammered dulcimer, hand drums and oh yeah, can't forget about the tambourine! The density of OCEANARIUM is thicker than a uranium atom with enough radioactive zest to please even the most hardened of proggers as it feels as expansive as the Pacific melding with the Atlantic with no clear boundaries set between them but yet each segment still exuding its own personality in the nebulous mix.

Because of the fact that this album is so chock full of sounds and creative ideas, i solicited a bit of info regarding the storyline to aid as a training wheel for those of us who don't have the patience to unravel all the mysteries through countless listens. Here are a few comments about the eight tracks delivered to me by Dan Britton himself:

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Track 1 - "A Numbered Rat, a High Ledge, and a Maze of Horizons" [11:32]
 Heavy to symphonic to fusion to heavy

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Track 2 - "Drifting Inner Skyline Space" [8:28] Can (the Inner Space) meets Marillion (the Skyline Drifters), though perhaps only titularly

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Track 3 - "The Blunt Sun and the Hardened Moon" [15:25] Sun Ra and Moondog battle for the soul of Rat-Man

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Track 4 - "Finding a Valley in a Gray Area on a Map" [3:24] 
Track 5 - "Finding a Shipwreck in a Valley in an Ocean" [6:20] These two tracks were originally one 10-minute piece but were split to fit the album better onto two LPs

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Track 6 - "Tropical Detective Squadron" [14:10] The soundtrack to an imaginary cop show from the 1960's, 1970's, or 1980's

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Track 7 - "Marooned and Torn Asunder" [8:06] A combination of musical ideas from "Saruned" off Heliotians and "Torn Amoonder" off Lunarians

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Track 8 - "Water to Glass / The Ultimate Solution" [12:31] Inspired by the PFM album Per un Amico, especially the songs "Appena un Po" and "Per un Amico"

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Britton cites some of the usual 70s suspects as influences such as King Crimson and Genesis as obvious reference points but also found many lesser known bands as inspiration giving credit to artists as diverse as Kayo Dot, Kenso, Maneige, Miriodor, Semiramis, Asia Minor, Kotebel and Crucis. While it is obvious that some of the symphonic keyboard styles are derived from the Japanese band Kenso, the more bombastic rock heft can clearly be heard from the Spanish band Kotebel as well as the extra symphonic touches coming from many of the aforementioned and beyond. Personally i find OCEANARIUM and its narrations through music prospect reminds me the most of Pekka Pohjola's classic musical narrative on "Harakka Bialoipokku" as the music is the only form of explanation of emotional connection to the storyline at hand and like the late Finnish maestro's best efforts, DELUGE GRANDER effortlessly convey the emotional rollercoaster ride through the sophistication of the musical tapestry of sound alone.

One other influence not cited that immediately comes to mind for me as well is the sophisticated symphonic texturing approaches of the American band Happy The Man with their light and uplifting overall mood elevating effects. In the end, DELUGE GRANDER succeed in amalgamating all of the prog heroes who came before yet sound themselves like no other progressive rock band and display in vivid sonic form exactly how highly complex prog should be done in the 21st century while still firmly placed within the ongoing traditions already set during the heyday of the 70s. OCEANARIUM not only takes the band's compositional approach to a personal higher level but also ups the bar for symphonic prog section of prog in general. Even for a hardened proghead like me, this one was a dense and impenetrable experience on the first spin, but subsequent listens have allowed it to sink in on a deeper level of consciousness as well as taking in the countless passages that are sewn together like a royal cloak in the high court. Here we are in the year 2017 and a new classic is born somewhere in the tiny US state of Maryland. Bravissimo! Great job, guys! Looking forward to the continuing saga.

4.5 but prog this good needs to be rounded up here :)

Thanks to avestin for the artist addition. and to Quinino for the last updates

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