Progarchives, the progressive rock ultimate discography

STYX

Prog Related • United States


From Progarchives.com, the ultimate progressive rock music website

Styx picture
Styx biography
Founded in Chicago, USA in 1972 - Hiatus between 1985-1989 and 1992-1994 - Still active as of 2017

STYX is one of those bands that are always mentioned with some fear and shame by the Progressive Rock fan, because they always played in the border that divides Prog from plain POP, I believe the best way to describe them is as Prog Related (understanding this description as the simplest and more commercial form of Progressive Rock) blended with AOR, somehow in the same vein as JOURNEY or BOSTON but much more complex.

Officially born in 1972 from the ashes of "The TRADEWINS" and "TW4" was formed by the Panozzo twins (Chuck on bass and John on drums), Dennis de Young (vocals and keyboards), James Young (guitar, vocals) and John Curulewski (guitar, vocals).

In the first years they were closer to progressive rock than ever, from 1972 to 1974 the band released four albums, "Styx", "Styx II", "The Serpent is Rising" and "Man of Miracles", even though they were popular in Chicago, still the band couldn't reach commercial success. As a curiosity, in their first album they recorded "Movement for a Common Man" based in Aaron Copland's Fanfare for the Common Man, almost five years before ELP. In 1975 they release their more commercially consistent album (at that point of course) "Equinox" which blended Rock & Roll, Pop and Progressive Rock in an efficient way, "Light Up", "Lorelei" and "Suite Madam Blue" are the first songs in which the band achieve some financial success and show the sound they pretended to create.

1976 was a crucial year for "STYX", John Curulewski leaves the band and is replaced by Tommy Shaw who became the front man with his California boy image (Even when he was born in Montgomery Alabama) and melodic but elaborate style, the band finally had the face capable of reaching the female public and massive acceptance, but writing some of the best STYX themes. "Crystal Ball" was released in the same year with a moderate success, "Crystal Ball", "Mademoiselle" and "Put me On" became favorites in their massive concerts, the band was reaching their commercial peak but started to abandon prog rock and turning into an ARENA band.

At this point the story is well known, "The Grand Illusion" became a platinum album with major hits like "Fooling Yourself" and of course "Come Sail Away", also their three next albums "Pieces of Eight", "Cornerstone" and "Paradise Theater" reached commercial success with tracks that go from ...
read more

STYX forum topics / tours, shows & news


STYX forum topics Create a topic now
STYX tours, shows & news Post an entries now

STYX Videos (YouTube and more)


Showing only random 3 | Show all STYX videos (2) | Search and add more videos to STYX

Buy STYX Music



More places to buy STYX music online

STYX discography


Ordered by release date | Showing ratings (top albums) | Help Progarchives.com to complete the discography and add albums

STYX top albums (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

2.81 | 138 ratings
Styx
1972
3.19 | 143 ratings
Styx II
1973
3.00 | 137 ratings
The Serpent Is Rising
1973
2.78 | 132 ratings
Man Of Miracles
1974
3.51 | 228 ratings
Equinox
1975
3.23 | 208 ratings
Crystal Ball
1976
3.75 | 332 ratings
The Grand Illusion
1977
3.64 | 273 ratings
Pieces Of Eight
1978
2.74 | 210 ratings
Cornerstone
1979
3.06 | 221 ratings
Paradise Theatre
1981
2.25 | 180 ratings
Kilroy Was Here
1983
2.68 | 84 ratings
Edge Of The Century
1990
2.81 | 77 ratings
Brave New World
1999
3.20 | 72 ratings
Cyclorama
2003
3.25 | 70 ratings
Big Bang Theory
2005
4.02 | 76 ratings
The Mission
2017
4.07 | 54 ratings
Crash of the Crown
2021

STYX Live Albums (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

3.68 | 48 ratings
Caught In The Act Live
1984
3.82 | 31 ratings
Return to Paradise
1997
2.26 | 8 ratings
Arch Allies - Live At Riverport
2000
3.88 | 13 ratings
Styxworld Live 2001
2001
3.29 | 7 ratings
At The River's Edge - Live In St. Louis
2002
3.00 | 6 ratings
21st Century Live
2003

STYX Videos (DVD, Blu-ray, VHS etc)

4.09 | 22 ratings
Return To Paradise (DVD)
1999
3.74 | 16 ratings
Styx and the Contemporary Youth Orchestra Of Cleveland: One With Everything
2006
2.64 | 16 ratings
Caught In The Act: Live 1984
2007
3.82 | 19 ratings
The Grand Illusion / Pieces of Eight Live
2012

STYX Boxset & Compilations (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

2.62 | 11 ratings
Best of Styx
1977
3.22 | 8 ratings
Classics, Vol 15
1987
2.85 | 32 ratings
Greatest Hits
1995
3.27 | 7 ratings
Greatest Hits Part 2
1996
4.20 | 5 ratings
The Best of Times: The Best of Styx
1997
4.08 | 4 ratings
The Singles Colllection
2000
4.00 | 2 ratings
Lady: The Encore Collection
2000
2.25 | 4 ratings
20th Century Masters - The Millennium Collection: The Best Of Styx
2002
2.38 | 4 ratings
Rockers
2003
3.60 | 11 ratings
Come Sail Away: The Styx Anthology
2004
3.38 | 26 ratings
The Complete Wooden Nickel Recordings
2005

STYX Official Singles, EPs, Fan Club & Promo (CD, EP/LP, MC, Digital Media Download)

4.00 | 3 ratings
Lady
1973
3.50 | 4 ratings
Light Up
1975
3.67 | 3 ratings
Best Thing
1975
3.67 | 3 ratings
Lorelei
1975
4.40 | 5 ratings
Come Sail Away
1977
3.20 | 6 ratings
Sing for the Day
1978
3.75 | 4 ratings
Blue Collar Man
1978
2.00 | 1 ratings
Enganandote (El Joven Enojado)
1978
2.14 | 3 ratings
Boat On The River
1979
3.00 | 2 ratings
Lights
1979
3.33 | 3 ratings
Renegado (Renegade)
1979
3.33 | 3 ratings
The Best Of Times
1980
1.33 | 5 ratings
Too Much Time on My Hands
1981
3.33 | 3 ratings
Rockin' The Paradise
1981
3.29 | 7 ratings
Regeneration
2011
3.00 | 2 ratings
The Same Stardust
2021

STYX Reviews


Showing last 10 reviews only
 Equinox by STYX album cover Studio Album, 1975
3.51 | 228 ratings

BUY
Equinox
Styx Prog Related

Review by ElChanclas

4 stars Equinox is the 5th studio album by American classic rock, progressive rock, hard rock band Styx, and the last to feature John Curulewski on guitars and vocals.

A New Year's Day Šlbum to light up the new born 1975, a total celebration indeed! Dennis DeYoung says is the first well mixed and produced Styx album, and I have to agree with that, all the instruments are perfectly balanced and the vocal trio sounds better than ever. A really solid record top to bottom with some higher highlights than others but always peaking, no offense but at some point it even sounds kind of British, specially in songs like Mother Dear? exquisite stuff! The Panozzo Bros are a rhythmic force tight as a blood bond could be, DeYoung has gone even more Prog like than on the previous Man of Miracles but this time with the correct melodic input in every perfect spot throughout the whole album. To my ears, the very first excellent album by these group of great musicians. Midnight Ride and Born for Adventure are the two rockers of the album and you can tell James Young has the credit to most of that heavy sound of side B, with the JC's beautiful instrumental Prelude 12" being the exception to that! Then comes the closer mini epic song Suite Madame Blue?exceptional keyboards, heavy riffing, Dennis's vocals are smooth, elegant and flawless, everything works perfectly here. For those who don't know this record, I highly recommend it!

 The Grand Illusion by STYX album cover Studio Album, 1977
3.75 | 332 ratings

BUY
The Grand Illusion
Styx Prog Related

Review by BrufordFreak
Collaborator Honorary Collaborator

3 stars The album that made Styx one of THE hot tickets for stadium rock concerts in the years following 1977, it was definitely the highpoint of both their creativity and popularity. Still retaining some respect and for their classical and almost-progressive penchant for experimental blends, the form of their most well known (and, surprisingly, radio- popular) "epic"--the six-and-a-half-minute "Come Sail Away"--as well as anthemic hits in the title song and "Fooling Yourself (Angry Young Man)", the KANSAS-like infusions of classical riffs and themes remain a strong and alluring element throughout this album--which is why prog rockers like me remained somewhat interested and allegiant. But, this was, unfortunately, the end. The 80s ushered in a kind of music that kind of pushed the "classic rock" and classical music-trained bands into the background--almost relegating them to "dinosaur" status despite the rise of Metal hair bands.

When listening to the Styx discography in order, I can't help but feel that the songs on this album pale in comparison to some of their previous songs, but as a whole album there is a kind of homogeneity here that works, that keeps the listener interested. I wonder how the band sounded repeating and/or reworking their 1970s productivity during the Naughties and Teens.

The first of my favorite Styx albums that I just can't force myself to give four stars to; I think that overall this is, like Supertramps' Breakfast in America and Pink Floyd's The Wall, an album of extreme popularity due to the crest of their wave of world-wide familiarity, not necessarily due to their best display of compositional creativity.

 Crystal Ball by STYX album cover Studio Album, 1976
3.23 | 208 ratings

BUY
Crystal Ball
Styx Prog Related

Review by BrufordFreak
Collaborator Honorary Collaborator

4 stars Again an album by a band that helped me enter and fall into love with the "prog" side of music, but which I had skipped due to its band members' choice to steer away from the experimental, album-oriented musical explorations. The radio successes of "Lady" and "Light Up" and "Lorelei" had, I think, lured them into the game of seeking "hits" and power-packed four- and five-minute songs over the suites and epics that had previously tempted them. Plus, I think Tommy Shaw was the recruit that kind of sealed the commitment to "rock" over "experimental" music. (Don't get me wrong: Mr. Shaw's talents are nothing to laugh at: he is quite talented as both guitarist, singer, and songwriter; he just had a more natural predilection toward rock than prog.) With Crystal Ball the band were able to crank out three more earworm anthems of radio- and crowd-friendly songs in "Jennifer" "Mademoiselle" and the title song. Even the opener, "Put Me On" couldn't help but display the band's previous and continued fixation and curiosity with classical music forms and structures, but then they develop into hard rockin' Blue ÷yster Cult-like aggression. Overall, Tommy's influence hadn't really taken over, he was still a guest/sideman, so the Panozzo/DeYoung/Young/Curulewski Catholic school collaborative spirit still reigned supreme--and Tommy fit in at first (listen to that searing guitar throughout Jennifer!). His stage presence (and long-haired angelic looks) gave the band a new dimension in concert (one that led to the attendance of swooning teenage girls--an element that was often absent at the concerts of the true hardcore progressive rock bands). "Shooz" and "This Old Man" (Tommy's impressive debut as a lead vocalist) showed the band's interest in exploring the type of jam music coming from the Southern Rock scene. "Clair de lune/Ballerina", like the title suggests, shows the band once again taking a well-known piece of pop classical music, and forcing it into a rock form and sound palette, and, unfortunately, once again not really succeeding (as Renaissance or ELP would). Again, this is not really a prog rock lover's dream album, but it is yet another step forward in the development and maturation of one of America's great stadium rock bands. Another album that is too good to relegate to the three star bin.
 Equinox by STYX album cover Studio Album, 1975
3.51 | 228 ratings

BUY
Equinox
Styx Prog Related

Review by BrufordFreak
Collaborator Honorary Collaborator

4 stars I was a late-comer to this album, mostly due to the fact that I had fallen into the miasma of true progressive rock and left the proto-, pseudo-, fringe-, and "-related" prog pretenders behind in favor of the likes of the real deal (Yes, Genesis, Nektar, Focus, Supertramp, Jean-Luc Ponty, Return to Forever, etc.) But then when Grand Illusion hit the scene, I had to look back. When I did deign to revisit the Styx albums that had appeared between Styx II and Grand Illusion, two albums, in particular, stuck out--primarily due the fact that both presented to the world each with two undeniably "classic" prog-rocky songs: from Equinox, "Lorelei" and "Light Up" and then "jennifer" and the title song from Crystal Ball (and, probably, "Mademoiselle"). Plus, both contained another one of the band's trademark pseudo- prog "epics": here "Prelude 12" and "Suite Madame Blue." Again, not truly prog, they are definitely on the fringes, with many of the trademark sounds and flourishes that make for some of the best progressive rock music--including great arrangements, great instrumental playing, great vocal harmonies, and great production. They just had too many melodic hooks (which made their stuff radio- and teenie-friendly) and compact, concise recordings (though some of their five-minute songs sure packed a ton of tension and dynamics into them!) And, again, I can't really claim this 3.5 star album to be "an excellent acquisition for all prog music lovers" but it is, to me, a sign of a band at the peak of its strengths--of which Styx had many (which might be why so many of us use them as a comparative reference when trying to assess, define, and describe modern bands). The bottom line is that this is a very solid album that has all of its songs deserving of attention and criticism.
 Styx II by STYX album cover Studio Album, 1973
3.19 | 143 ratings

BUY
Styx II
Styx Prog Related

Review by BrufordFreak
Collaborator Honorary Collaborator

4 stars There was something in the sound, the dynamics, the incredible vocals and guitar lick solo in "Lady" that led me, for the first time, to actually go out to a record store and buy a full-length record album--this one. Up to this point, I was depending on either my brother or the Columbia Record Club to provide me with full-album experiences, but with Styx II I became aware that there was a lot of music out there that Columbia did not give me access to.

I've always considered this a prog album, even at the time of first discovery (though I might not have used the term "prog" or even "progressive rock"), as there are several forays into experimental, not-for-radio-play songs, like "Father O.S.A.", "A Day", "Little Fugue in G", and even the "Earl of Roseland". The instrumental variety and prowess exhibited on Styx II were, to me, reminiscent of another one of Chicago's finest (and a contemporary of Styx), that being Chicago Transit Authority (without the horns, of course): experimental music forms, great melodic hooks, and multiple GREAT vocalists. (And this was before the arrival of the great Tommy Shaw!) Plus, they were both unafraid to "go their own way" and not conform to the pressures of achieving radio popularity (at least, not with every song). Definitely a seminal album in the evolution of my musical tastes--one that came to me in my 15th year. While I do not, or have never, consider this a "masterpiece" of music--prog or otherwise--it has some historically noteworthy highlights and definitely demonstrates the uprising of a band that would become a force in the anthemic, stadium rock scene that ran rampant in the U.S. of A in the 1970s and 80s.

A 3.5 star collection that is probably only "good, but non-essential" but has always been privately cherished and honored by this music lover.

 Kilroy Was Here by STYX album cover Studio Album, 1983
2.25 | 180 ratings

BUY
Kilroy Was Here
Styx Prog Related

Review by Warthur
Prog Reviewer

4 stars Mr. Roboto might have been the hit single, but the rest of this concept album resembles the style that Styx used on Paradise Theatre with a somewhat bigger synthpop influence. They don't go full synthpop, mind - just like they didn't really go full prog on The Grand Illusion - which makes Roboto a bit uncharacteristic of the rest of the album, which is a shame because it's an undeniably catchy song. (Though it's rather unfortunate that the droids on the album cover or in the music video look like racist caricatures.)

The really big shift here is that whilst Paradise Theatre's concept was fairly restrained and sober - a state-of-the-nation look at America at the end of the 1970s through the allegorical lens of the rise and fall of a legendary concert venue - Kilroy's story is absolutely goofy. "Rock opera about a dystopia where music is banned" is very, very well-worn territory by this point; Rush got the idea out of their system on one side of 2112, Zappa stretched the concept to 3 LPs in the Joe's Garage series (but wasn't really focusing on the story that much, if at all), Dream Theater would base The Astonishing around it and that Queen jukebox musical uses the concept too.

Styx may well have been beating Queen and Dream Theater to the punch here, but Rush and Zappa had told this story before and done it better, and had done it not that long before Styx did it. Sure, the subject matter probably felt more immediate to Styx due to Christian groups objecting to Snowblind from Paradise Theatre, but even so it feels like they don't really have much to say about this concept which hadn't been said better by others, and DeYoung's quasi- Messianic posing as Kilroy is unquestionably cheesy.

If you like Styx's brand of cheesiness, that's not necessarily a problem, especially if the idea of a substantially more synth-focused take on Paradise Theatre appeals to you. If you fell in love with the sound of The Grand Illusion or Pieces of Eight, I can see why this album might bug you. I like it, but equally it clearly marks the point where the band's sound has strayed so far from their prog-adjacent hard rock roots that it's no surprise that they needed to spend the rest of the 1980s taking a break from being Styx after this.

 Paradise Theatre by STYX album cover Studio Album, 1981
3.06 | 221 ratings

BUY
Paradise Theatre
Styx Prog Related

Review by Warthur
Prog Reviewer

4 stars Doing a concept album just as you are dialling back the prog aspects of your work and presenting a more straight- ahead AOR style might be counterintuitive, but on Paradise Theatre the tactic pays off for Styx.

Hilariously. Christian groups and censorious politicians got upset about Snowblind - the former outright accusing it of being Satanic - despite the fact that it's not remotely as heavy as, say, Sabbath's song of the same name. There's at most a mild increase in the proportion of hard rock in the band's sound here compared to Cornerstone - but Cornerstone was a low water mark in that respect, and much of the album tends towards the softer end of AOR.

If you were charmed by The Grand Illusion because of the prog touches that Styx incorporated here and there in their sound and found their more straightforward material and ballads uninspiring, you likely won't dig this, but for those who find the latter aspects of their sound endearing this is a bit of a treat.

 Cornerstone by STYX album cover Studio Album, 1979
2.74 | 210 ratings

BUY
Cornerstone
Styx Prog Related

Review by Warthur
Prog Reviewer

4 stars As the 1970s faded away and the 1980s hove into view, the rise of punk and metal meant that hard rock sort of fell between two stools - too hard for people who wanted something softer, but no longer hard enough to satisfy audiences who had heard more aggressive and challenging sounds now flooding the airwaves.

Whilst Styx's Pieces of Eight was a defiant bit of hard rock with prog and pop touches which bucked the commercial trends of the era, Styx found their AOR blend dialling back on the hardness, turning into a form of pop rock with occasional prog influences and a good deal of synthesiser texture from Dennis DeYoung. The synths here certainly date the album a bit - too modern in their sounds to quite fit the mellotrons-and-Moogs era of the early to mid 1970s, but sufficiently dated that they still sound a little cheesy, but then again Styx's guileless, unironic embrace of mild cheesiness is perhaps part of their charm. Cornerstone might see them abandoning the balance of influences that made The Grand Illusion and Pieces of Eight so strong, but I can't say I dislike it.

 Pieces Of Eight by STYX album cover Studio Album, 1978
3.64 | 273 ratings

BUY
Pieces Of Eight
Styx Prog Related

Review by Warthur
Prog Reviewer

4 stars On The Grand Illusion, Styx did a fine job of walking the tightrope between poppy AOR and prog-tinged hard rock, and on Pieces of Eight they try to do much the same. As with its predecessor, it's a carefully judged balanced: there's just enough hard rock touches to make it feel credible in that arena without compromising the radio-friendliness, and just enough little flourishes to give a hint of prog whilst still prioritising pop hooks over prog complexity. (That said, going terse can bring its own benefits: on I'm OK the band cram a bunch of little movements into under six minutes, yielding a song which gives the feeling of a multi-part prog epic without demanding the runtime of one.)

This sort of alchemy makes them exactly the sort of band the term AOR was coined to describe - because they're not prog rock or hard rock or pop rock or soft rock to be unambiguously described by any of those terms, but are enough like all of those things that they're clearly some flavour of rock aimed at a somewhat more mature audience than more singles-oriented genres.

At the same time, "AOR" tends to be associated with very commercially-oriented material, but that's a little unfair here. Sing For the Day isn't the sort of song you do expecting it to be a hit, and likewise if you were just trying to churn out viable radio material the 1-minute instrumental The Message is a weird thing to spend time on; in 1978 if you were wanting to chase the big money you'd be making disco or new wave. (Styx would eventually do exactly that, but they don't do it here.)

In fact, you could argue that despite being as radio-friendly as it is, Pieces of Eight is commercial despite itself - it isn't necessarily being anti-commercial, but it is being anti-bandwagon. It's carrying the torch for progressively-tinged hard rock in an era when many bands working that style were shifting away from it - Lords of the Ring puts me in mind of the more grandiose efforts of early Queen, for instance, who this same year were putting out material like Fat Bottomed Girls. On the whole, the album doesn't capture the same lightning in a bottle as The Grand Illusion, but it comes very close.

 Crystal Ball by STYX album cover Studio Album, 1976
3.23 | 208 ratings

BUY
Crystal Ball
Styx Prog Related

Review by Sidscrat

4 stars Breakthrough Number 2! I know many people do not consider Styx to be a prog band and going back to their first album, it is obvious they likely never would have made it in Progland.

History: They jumped on the bandwagon of prog on that first album but it seemed forced as if they were attempting to find a place in Progland. That is my least favorite album of the John Curulewski (JC) era. Then Serpent and Miracles came out in quick succession and each album in my opinion had plenty of prog leanings and they were better defined. I do like songs on both those albums. I feel that without them there could be no Equinox. The production quality of the albums under the Wooden Nickel label was nothing to be proud of. Equinox (OF COURSE) was the pinnacle of JC's time with the band. They jumped ship to A&M and production was strong.

EQ remains one of the absolute best Styx albums to me and so many others. I struggle with it being #1 as it teeters between this album Crystal Ball. Just to clarify, JC didn't leave the band after recording EQ to be with family; he walked away after a spat with Dennis (Control Freak) DeYoung who wore the pants in the family. JC didn't get along with anyone well and was always the dissenting voice so his departure was going to come at some point. The rest of the band didn't want to get stuck with him as they assigned hotel rooms as he was such a negative person. He had threatened to walk many times and this time the band said: "Fine! Don't let the door hit you in the lutimus maximus on the way out." Wooden Nickel did squat to promote their albums so they left that label but A&M did no better frustrating JC and others. Seems A&M were too busy drooling over the unexpected mega sales of the Frampton Comes Alive album they labeled. Frampton was a nobody who got famous with a live record. A&M shifted attention to pouring money out to promote that mess and shafted Styx. This was one of the reasons JC was disillusioned. EQ would have been a smash had A&M pushed it.

Crystal Ball All this being said, JC left just as they had to tour the EQ album so that frantic search quickly led to Shaw. Interestingly enough his choice would become probably the best fast addition to any band. Crystal Ball as I said is one of my absolute favorite Styx albums tied with Equinox. Many of the songs some reviewers here have yawned over are my favorites and ones that many rave over were more sleepers to me. I am a big Proghead but also love solid non-pop rock.

CB has that and some prog flavoring to spice things up. I consider "Put Me On" to be the best track on the album and probably one of the absolute best opening songs of any album. It is prog to a point moving from one section to the next and avoids the usual Verse-Chorus-Verse structure. The catchy intro with dualling keys and strings followed by the extreme high pitched harmony vocals that hurt my vocal chords just thinking about it, Then JY's usual over the top vocals are perfect for that song. While some do not like his singing, I find that some songs that he sings could not be done well by any other member. The guitar solo is pure guitar on speed and one of the greatest quick solos of all time. That transitions into another softer section and crashes abruptly into the DeYoung-Shaw "Mademoiselle" which are a fitting intro to Tommy's talents within the band. His voice is better than JC's was in my opinion. The harmonizing guitars near the end are incredible in impact.

"Jennifer" doesn't ping my Excite-O-Meter anymore than "Lorelei" on EQ did. I am just not a love song kind of chap. The title track is okay but not tremendous until it drops into the guitar solo and the climax ending. Shaw's vocals are perfect for the song. It does have a prog feel to it. Shooz is an awesome punchy track that many do not like. I love Shaw's vocals and that slide guitar solo is great. "This Old Man" has the feel of some tracks off their earlier albums which I like. The final track "Clair de Lune / Ballerina" leaves me wondering how they could finish such a great album with such a bland and lifeless song.

In all I can see why most critics think it was a lesser offering to Equinox but I feel that some of the finer tracks are a good progression from where they have been to where they were going. Styx lasted 2 more albums but DeYoung's forced push away from their roots into the trap of Ballad Land killed the band and his stubborn refusal to continue the hard rock and light prog direction sent the band into Grand Delusion land. Crystal Ball represents an awesome new beginning to a band who already had melded musically. Shaw fits like a glove.

Thanks to IvŠn_Melgar_M for the artist addition. and to Quinino for the last updates

Copyright Prog Archives, All rights reserved. | Legal Notice | Privacy Policy | Advertise | RSS + syndications

Other sites in the MAC network: JazzMusicArchives.com — jazz music reviews and archives | MetalMusicArchives.com — metal music reviews and archives

Donate monthly and keep PA fast-loading and ad-free forever.