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LED ZEPPELIN

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Led Zeppelin biography
Founded in London, UK in 1968 - Disbanded in 1980 - One-off reunions in 1985, 1988, 1995 and 2007

Led Zeppelin formed in 1968 as a residue of The Yardbirds. Jimmy PAGE was the last remaining member and had to fulfill some concert obligations in Scandinavia. Page teamed up with John Paul JONES, with whom he worked with on previous session engagements, and they decided to form a band together, after contributing to Donovan's Hurdy Gurdy Man album , they started searching for a singer and a drummer to complete the band. Page went to see Robert PLANT on recommendation by Terry Reid (Terry didn't want to do the vocals, he also turned down DEEP PURPLE for that matter), and immediately loved his voice and stage appearance, Robert PLANT on his turn recommended John BONHAM for drums with whom he played before in his Birmingham based band "Band Of Joy". The band members hit it off immediately and together they went on the Scandinavian tour as 'The New yardbirds". Considering their intend of forming a rock band they needed a proper name. Keith Moon once commented on the New Yardbirds show "This band will go down like a lead balloon" and derived from that came the new name of the soon to be legendary band Led Zeppelin.

Over the years Led Zeppelin came in many guises, from the heavy blues rock that dominated their first two albums, to the folk and acoustics that made up half of their 3rd and 4th album, and the more funky, even slightly progressive Houses of the Holy, and the bombastically baroque Physical Graffiti to the classic rock that prevailed in their last two albums. Led Zeppelin can be categorized as a heavier continuation of what Cream set in motion, with blues drenched, folk inflected and guitar dominated rock, using all the different styles rock could be played in, from blues, to folk, funk, pop, classical elements, Rock and Roll and metal, with side-steps that even included country and reggae, as well as psychedelic and large portions of what can be considered progressive rock. Aside from being a great rock band, their influence was felt throughout the heavy rock spectrum.

Typical elements in Led Zeppelin sounds are the funky electric guitar drives, delicate and technical acoustic guitar pieces, sophisticated multi-layered arrangements, a fabulous rhythm section with heavy drumming from John ...
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LED ZEPPELIN discography


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LED ZEPPELIN top albums (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

4.05 | 1047 ratings
Led Zeppelin
1969
3.98 | 987 ratings
Led Zeppelin II
1969
3.94 | 950 ratings
Led Zeppelin III
1970
4.41 | 1275 ratings
Led Zeppelin IV
1971
3.93 | 915 ratings
Houses Of The Holy
1973
4.05 | 953 ratings
Physical Graffiti
1975
3.38 | 671 ratings
Presence
1976
2.93 | 628 ratings
In Through the Out Door
1979

LED ZEPPELIN Live Albums (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

3.82 | 328 ratings
The Soundtrack from the Film - The Song Remains the Same
1976
4.28 | 182 ratings
BBC Sessions
1997
4.38 | 235 ratings
How The West Was Won
2003
4.54 | 158 ratings
Celebration Day
2012

LED ZEPPELIN Videos (DVD, Blu-ray, VHS etc)

4.00 | 162 ratings
The Song Remains The Same (Film)
1990
4.46 | 175 ratings
Led Zeppelin
2003
2.78 | 9 ratings
Rock Milestones Led Zeppelin's IV
2005
3.29 | 7 ratings
The Led Zeppelin In Concert (extract from 'The Song Remains The Same')
2005
3.71 | 7 ratings
Complete Rock Case Studies
2009

LED ZEPPELIN Boxset & Compilations (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

3.07 | 11 ratings
2 Originals Of Led Zeppelin
1974
2.47 | 312 ratings
Coda
1982
2.29 | 10 ratings
The 10 Legendary Singles
1989
3.95 | 57 ratings
Led Zeppelin (Box set)
1990
4.14 | 91 ratings
Remasters
1992
3.97 | 28 ratings
The Complete Studio Recordings
1993
3.92 | 26 ratings
Boxed Set II
1993
3.60 | 44 ratings
Early Days: The Best of Led Zeppelin Volume One
1999
2.92 | 41 ratings
Latter Days: The Best of Led Zeppelin Volume Two
2000
3.77 | 81 ratings
Mothership
2007

LED ZEPPELIN Official Singles, EPs, Fan Club & Promo (CD, EP/LP, MC, Digital Media Download)

3.43 | 26 ratings
Good Times Bad Times
1969
3.90 | 35 ratings
Whole Lotta Love
1969
4.07 | 27 ratings
Immigrant Song / Hey, Hey, What Can I Do
1970
3.00 | 4 ratings
Living Loving Maid (She's Just a Woman)
1970
3.50 | 4 ratings
Bron-Y-Aur Stomp
1970
4.50 | 4 ratings
El Emigrante
1970
3.73 | 17 ratings
Black Dog/Misty Mountain Hop
1971
4.75 | 46 ratings
Stairway To Heaven
1971
4.13 | 23 ratings
Rock And Roll / Four Sticks
1972
4.00 | 2 ratings
Acoustically
1972
4.00 | 4 ratings
This Is Led Zeppelin
1973
4.33 | 6 ratings
Over the Hills and Far Away
1973
3.80 | 28 ratings
D'yer Maker
1973
4.00 | 3 ratings
The Ocean
1973
4.04 | 25 ratings
Trampled Underfoot
1975
4.40 | 5 ratings
Fool in the Rain
1979
3.68 | 18 ratings
Wearing And Tearing
1982
3.75 | 13 ratings
The Girl I Love
1997
4.15 | 20 ratings
Whole Lotta Love
1997

LED ZEPPELIN Reviews


Showing last 10 reviews only
 Coda by LED ZEPPELIN album cover Boxset/Compilation, 1982
2.47 | 312 ratings

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Coda
Led Zeppelin Prog Related

Review by Dellinger

2 stars So the "last" Led Zeppelin album, released with leftovers from their discographly... and you can hear it. Besides "I Can't Quit You Baby", which for some reason I like better than their version on their first album, there is nothing I really find worth of being in any of their previous albums. Most songs are OK, some a bit annoying, but mostly the album sounds like the less inspired parts of all their previous albums. I guess it's best not to consider it part of their studio discography, as it was considered by Atlantic, and rather think of it as a collection of leftovers, as it really is.
 Latter Days: The Best of Led Zeppelin Volume Two by LED ZEPPELIN album cover Boxset/Compilation, 2000
2.92 | 41 ratings

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Latter Days: The Best of Led Zeppelin Volume Two
Led Zeppelin Prog Related

Review by AtomicCrimsonRush
Special Collaborator Symphonic Team

3 stars And so we come to the Church of the Latter Days Zeps and it does not preach the mastery and brilliance of its Early Days counterpart. Now certainly there are some jewels here that any respectable rock band would be chafing at the bit to record, but following LZ4 the music could never measure up to the masterpiece. The CD in question has been released with its superior Early Years comp, as a kind of box set, and is all the better for it. Of course this means on their own they have become redundant.

The packaging is the drawcard for me having owned every morsel that Zeppelin have served up. The cover of the latter years now adorns the back cover of the Early years. The real grabber is that both CDs have a whopping running time of 2 hours 15 minutes. Thats a Whole lotta Zep that you can immerse your ears in.

 Early Days: The Best of Led Zeppelin Volume One by LED ZEPPELIN album cover Boxset/Compilation, 1999
3.60 | 44 ratings

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Early Days: The Best of Led Zeppelin Volume One
Led Zeppelin Prog Related

Review by AtomicCrimsonRush
Special Collaborator Symphonic Team

4 stars The packaging of this Zeppellation is simply amaze balls, and being a NASA addict, I was drawn into the sticky web of yet another Zeppelin's greatest Treasures. It is definitely for newcomers to the band and serves them well with 5, count them, 5 sapphires of rock from Led Zeppelin IV the masterpiece. The other tracks are slices of granite carved out of the first 3 monolithic albums and they are a good choice. The only qualm I have is that the CD on its lonesome is now fundamentally redundant as it is now only served up with its Latter day counterpart. Grab them both in one package and you have an excellent addition to your classic proto prog collection.
 Mothership by LED ZEPPELIN album cover Boxset/Compilation, 2007
3.77 | 81 ratings

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Mothership
Led Zeppelin Prog Related

Review by AtomicCrimsonRush
Special Collaborator Symphonic Team

4 stars The Mothership landed to unleash a barrage of Zeppelin for the uninitiated and it is a worthy successor to the myriad of Zeppilations on offer. 2 CDs jam packed with LZ classics is irrisistible and it is actually still selling on shelves in Australia CD stores. Yes, folks, they still exist here. The packaging is classy, love the art work and each disc is a treasure. Yes, all Zeppeholics will own every track, and the Remasters did it all before, but this is still a grand enough project to dip your toes in when you need a bit of Zeppelin in your system.

So what have we on offer? Only the Greatest LZ you are likely to hear. On the menu are brilliant gems Good Times Bad Times, Communication Breakdown, Dazed And Confused, Whole Lotta Love , Immigrant Song, Rock And Roll, Black Dog, Stairway To Heaven. And that leaves CD 2 with some triumphs to wade through such as Kashmir, Nobody's Fault But Mine and Achilles Last Stand. Basically every song is a jewel and there are no surprises, apart from the fact that there is nothing live which is when they are in their most experimental mood. You can find the CD at a reasonable price easily, unlike some other comps that are becoming scarce.

 Led Zeppelin by LED ZEPPELIN album cover Studio Album, 1969
4.05 | 1047 ratings

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Led Zeppelin
Led Zeppelin Prog Related

Review by Gallifrey

3 stars 9th June, 2021: Led Zeppelin - s/t (blues/hard rock, 1969)

Believe it or not, I've never really listed to Led Zeppelin. This is only the third album I've heard from them in full, and I never thought a lot of the other two. I think I can appreciate the playing, the production, and very occasionally the riffs, but there's a lot of their sound that in my opinion bands did better much later on. Plus, you know, the whole stealing music thing. This has some great bits and pieces, but there are entire songs of Plant aimlessly wailing that I really can't get into.

5.9 (2nd listen)

Part of my listening diary from my facebook music blog - www.facebook.com/TheExoskeletalJunction

 In Through the Out Door by LED ZEPPELIN album cover Studio Album, 1979
2.93 | 628 ratings

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In Through the Out Door
Led Zeppelin Prog Related

Review by Dellinger

2 stars Just like Presence, I find this album more annoying than anything... without much of the hard rock songs that I love from them, let alone the epic ones. But unlike Presence, this one doesn't have a song as great as "Achilles Last Stand" to save it. I don't give it one star because there is "In the Evening", which is good, as well as "All my Love", but still they are not at the same level of their greatest songs from previous albums. It's a shame that this would be the last album they would record before the end of their career.
 Presence by LED ZEPPELIN album cover Studio Album, 1976
3.38 | 671 ratings

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Presence
Led Zeppelin Prog Related

Review by Dellinger

3 stars Except for the opening and closing tracks, this album does just about nothing for me, except annoy me. There's not much hard rock, or even just memorable rock on the in between tracks, only annoying songs that try to be groovy or something, which are just the kind of songs I never liked on previous albums. I go for three stars just because of Achilles Last Stand, the best song on this album, and one of my very favourite Zep tracks, being long and heavy and one of their proggiest songs, and Tea for One is a very nice long blues track that should not be forgotten either.
 In Through the Out Door by LED ZEPPELIN album cover Studio Album, 1979
2.93 | 628 ratings

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In Through the Out Door
Led Zeppelin Prog Related

Review by TCat
Special Collaborator Honorary Collaborator / Retired Admin

3 stars This one (along with every other LZ album) has been reviewed so many times that it doesn't require much of an introduction. It was the last LZ studio album to be released by the band, but they didn't know that at the time. I tend to agree with most reviewers here that it is probably their weakest album, though it's not one that I ignore either. It seems I love the songs that most people hate on this album and loathe the ones that most seem to enjoy, and that is why I wanted to add my review on this album.

Pretty much everyone knows that history here, so I don't want to go into that. The album tends to concentrate on John Paul Jones' keyboard work than any other album they released, and that seems to give it a somewhat lighter feel. I think the way they merged their sound with the increased use of keyboards was a bit daring, but they did it well, still allowing for Page a good amount of time for some guitar soloing. It's just that a lot of the riffs and background sound was produced by the keys, and LZ fans were not used to that. But, then the band was also new to this sound, and it doesn't always work out so well.

It all starts out with that mysterious sounding introduction on "In the Evening", which is Page making some interesting sounds on a guitar effect device that was invented by Godley and Crme of 10cc. This device would also be used on the long "Carouselambra" track. This first track does sound more like an older LZ track, but the problem here is that the mixing makes it sound a bit muddy. I wasn't too impressed when I first heard it, but since then, I have come to accept it for what it is. The next two tracks are much better and brighter; "South Bound Saurez" and "Fool in the Rain" which do use a lot more repeating riffs from the keys that drive the songs forward. I love both of these tracks and the upbeat feeling they give LZ's music, and Page does get to do some great guitar work on them. Same thing with the track "Hot Dog", which stands apart from any LZ track as being a very rockabilly style track. Again, I absolutely love this one even though most people hate it. Page does some really great soloing on this, just listen to how fast he plays. How can this song not put a smile on your face? Plus, it is also an indicator to where post-Zeppelin members would go (as in The Honeydrippers).

In my opinion, "Carouselambra" is the track that ruins the album for me. This is a 10-minute track, which in reality, was originally 3 songs that have been glued together, two up-tempo songs bookending a slower song in the middle. There's nothing wrong with a suite, I suppose, but these three songs don't give a chance for any soloing and are mostly headed over by Plant's vocals (which seem a bit uninterested here) and Jones' repeating keyboard riffs. This is my least liked track out of all of LZ's tracks. "All My Love" is a pretty decent ballad, though it is a bit light for LZ music, it's still got a nice melody, some great keyboard and guitar work, but just a bit too much repetitiveness and way to much air play has made it less interesting. "I'm Gonna Crawl" ends the album with one of my favorite LZ tracks. I love the heavy orchestral accompaniment here, the slow bluesy feel of it all and Plant's vocals are the best on the album. I think it's an amazing end to a somewhat lesser album from the band.

The main reason I have a hard time with this album has mostly to do with the amount of time given for the uninteresting "Carouselambra", which ends up being a quarter of the album. That along with the bad production on "In the Evening" puts the album down into 3 star territory for me. The rest of the album I consider to be pretty good, though, but it's not quite good enough to raise it another star. I think with time, they might have worked out their style changes if they decided to continue down that road, but we'll never really know for sure. Robert Plant has put out some pretty good solo material and Page and Plant has done some great work together, but it never quite got up to the level LZ was able to put out in previous albums, especially with "Houses of the Holy", "LZ III" and "Physical Graffiti".

 Physical Graffiti by LED ZEPPELIN album cover Studio Album, 1975
4.05 | 953 ratings

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Physical Graffiti
Led Zeppelin Prog Related

Review by Dellinger

3 stars This one seems to be among the best loved Zeppelin albums by fans, as well as a favorite among double albums. Yet, I don't really hear what's so great about it... besides Kashmir, of course. And then, perhaps it's Kashmir in great part the one that makes it sound bad, since the rest of the album sounds nothing like it, so much that it actually sounds out of place within the album... or else, perhaps the order of the songs within the album were not well chosen. I think Kashmir would have sounded much better at the end of disc two, which has many songs that go better with it, and which I particularly like better, and take the last two songs from that disc for disc one, giving the whole album a much stronger end, and making both discs sound much more coherent within them.
 Houses Of The Holy by LED ZEPPELIN album cover Studio Album, 1973
3.93 | 915 ratings

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Houses Of The Holy
Led Zeppelin Prog Related

Review by TCat
Special Collaborator Honorary Collaborator / Retired Admin

5 stars So, I'm pretty much safe in saying that most everyone here has probably heard this album and most everyone is quite familiar with the songs on it. I find it interesting that the ratings are all over the board on it, but I also find that the albums by Led Zeppelin that have more variety on them are the ones that I like the best. This is one of them, and I don't feel bad for giving it a five star rating. I call it essential even if I find it has one of their worst songs on it (The Crunge), at least I have come to appreciate it more than I used to, but I still find it rather obnoxious. Other than that, I find it quite the perfect album and put it up there with my other LZ favorites: "III" and "Physical Graffiti". The reason why is I find that it shows the band branching out from their usual rock/blues style and exploring new sounds, while not exactly abandoning their roots completely. That exploration is what progressive rock is all about. These new exploratory styles present in the music of this album is mostly due to the fact that they had two home studios to work from which allowed the members to better develop their music.

Starting with "The Song Remains the Same", the guitar is suddenly more "jangly" and brighter than what we are used to hearing from the band, and quite frankly, I hear a lot of what inspires the sound of several bands that were to become famous in the next 5-10 years that were waiting for their turn. This upbeat and non-melodic guitar comes in several times with its quick riff and is interspersed with a more slow, bluesy vocal melody, the meter and tempo changing throughout the track. The opening riff was originally supposed to be an instrumental overture for "The Rain Song", but Plant wrote some lyrics and they ended up expanding it to a full-fledged song. "The Rain Song" is probably one of LZ's best ballads and at over 7 minutes in length, the mellotron gives the song an expansive and epic feel in which it never gets boring, but it beautiful and dynamic all the way through. The song itself was inspired to prove a point to George Harrison who wondered if LZ ever wrote any ballads. LZ always felt these first two songs belonged together probably stemming from the fact that the first was supposed to be an overture for the second. I just know its one of my favorite songs by the band because of its detail in the guitar, the piano, the mellotron, everything is just perfect here.

The next track is just as perfect in my opinion, a shorter track with acoustic and electric sections that melds together so well, the excellent "Over the Hills and Far Away" which more closely resembles some of their older tracks, but which is still more reflective of their later albums nonetheless. So, up to this point, we have 3 excellent songs in a row. This is followed for a (thankfully) shorter track that was actually more of a joke song than anything else, poking a little fun at James Brown. In actuality, it is a bit complex in that it is supposed to be a funky sounding song, but the beat is intentionally off quite a bit to make it difficult to dance to. It is built off of a jam session from the band. Knowing that it is mostly a satirical song tends to explain it's nature a bit, but it still doesn't take away the fact that the vocals are some of Plant's worst. But I do like the instrumentals in it. This is the weakest point of the album in my opinion, but I still esteem this album enough to consider it essential anyway.

"Dancing Days" is one of LZ's most accessible tracks, but I still love it. It's placement on the album is perfect and helps to bring the listener back out into the sunshine. Also, since it follows one of their worst songs, it helps to elevate the entire album. It's inspired from a song the band heard in Bombay, so it fits in a bit with the psychedelic styles of the day, but does so in such a way that attracts the masses. "D'yer Mak'er" then sees the band take a stab at reggae while mixing in Plant's doo-wop style of singing. This is one that I used to hate, but over the last several years, have come to appreciate it much more. Most everyone is familiar with this track, so there isn't much point going into much more detail than that.

Next, the band takes us back to the more mysterious sounds of their previous years, but retaining their more developed styles at the same time. The combination of these two things are what makes "No Quarter" one of their best tracks and also one of their biggest fan favorites. The original form of this track was meant for inclusion on their "IV (Runes)" album, which accounts partly for it's slight return to original form. It also became a track that was improvised upon in many of the band's concerts as a showcase for John Paul Jones and his mastery at keys. It varies between quiet ambience and heavy, dark metal throughout allowing for a masterful study in dynamics. The band members state that this track is very important in their development and influenced their future ideas of just what rock music could accomplish The album ends with "The Ocean" which is symbolic of LZ's waves and waves of fans. The track utilizes two alternating meters which not only make it a more complex sound, but emulates the movement of waves in the ocean quite effectively, even up to the feeling of the crashing of the waves against the shore in Page's guitar stylings at the end of each phrase. This one is an underrated masterpiece.

While a few bits and pieces of the tracks from this album come from earlier sessions, jams and concerts, the fact that the band was now able to develop their music more extensively really make these tracks work together so well. There were, at the same time, some tracks also come from these sessions that weren't used until later. The funky sounding title track "Houses of the Holy" was going to be on this album, but was saved for their next album "Physical Graffiti" along with "The Rover" and "Black Country Woman". Another track "Walter's Walk" was released on their final album, which was really a compilation of unused material; "Coda".

So, for me, this album has always been one of my favorites, and still remains so because of the band's willingness to explore and expand their sound. Their music here is so much better developed than ever, not to say that their previous albums weren't good, because they were excellent, but this one was that one step better in my opinion. The music is not the standard fare, but show the band could take on other styles and do them so convincingly, plus the fact that it shows the band integrating other instruments very effectively into their established sound and style. Yes it's considered prog-related, but it is also a masterpiece.

Thanks to Tuxon for the artist addition. and to Quinino for the last updates

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