Progarchives, the progressive rock ultimate discography

DEEP PURPLE

Proto-Prog • United Kingdom


From Progarchives.com, the ultimate progressive rock music website

Deep Purple picture
Deep Purple biography
Founded in Hertford, UK in 1968 - Hiatus between 1976-1984 - Still active as of 2018

The archetypal hard rock band, hugely influential, and still alive and well after almost 40 years, DEEP PURPLE were formed in Hertford (England) in 1968. Their earliest line-up (known as Mark I) featured guitarist Ritchie BLACKMORE, drummer Ian Paice (who was to be the only constant member in all the numerous incarnations of the band), keyboardist Jon LORD, bassist Nick Simper and vocalist Rod Evans. Their first album, "Shades of Deep Purple", included a cover of JOE SOUTH's "Hush", which became a big hit in the USA. The following two efforts were definitely more progressive in tone, especially their third, self-titled album, which saw Lord's masterful, classically-influenced use of the B3 Hammond organ steal the limelight.

In 1969, Evans and Simper were fired, to be replaced by two former Episode Six members, bassist Roger GLOVER and legendary vocalist Ian GILLAN, who had also starred in the lead role in the original version of Andrew Lloyd-Webber and Tim Rice's "Jesus Christ Superstar". This line-up, which is widely known as DEEP PURPLE Mark II, gave the band international renown - even though their first album, Lord's pet project "Concerto for Group and Orchestra" (recorded with the Royal Philharmonic Orchestra) was poorly received.

With Gillan and Glover on board, DEEP PURPLE recorded a series of extremely successful albums, which saw them blend the progressive stylings of their first three albums with an increasingly harder-edged approach, like 1970' ground-breaking "In Rock". Their sound featured lengthy, dazzling duels between Lord's Hammond and Blackmore's Stratocaster, punctuated by Gillan's sky-high screams - nowhere better embodied than in their stunning, 1972 live album, "Made in Japan". In the same year, they released "Machine Head", one of the essential rock albums of all time, which featured the seminal riff of "Smoke on the Water" (inspired by a true episode happened during the recording of the album itself in Montreux, Switzerland), as well as other classics such as "Highway Star" and "Space Truckin'".

Unfortunately, ego clash...
read more

DEEP PURPLE forum topics / tours, shows & news


DEEP PURPLE forum topics Create a topic now
DEEP PURPLE tours, shows & news Post an entries now

DEEP PURPLE Videos (YouTube and more)


Showing only random 3 | Show all DEEP PURPLE videos (2) | Search and add more videos to DEEP PURPLE

Buy DEEP PURPLE Music



More places to buy DEEP PURPLE music online

DEEP PURPLE discography


Ordered by release date | Showing ratings (top albums) | Help Progarchives.com to complete the discography and add albums

DEEP PURPLE top albums (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

3.30 | 585 ratings
Shades of Deep Purple
1968
3.22 | 563 ratings
The Book of Taliesyn
1968
3.62 | 650 ratings
Deep Purple
1969
4.35 | 1257 ratings
Deep Purple in Rock
1970
3.79 | 872 ratings
Fireball
1971
4.33 | 1257 ratings
Machine Head
1972
3.03 | 584 ratings
Who Do We Think We Are
1973
3.86 | 860 ratings
Burn
1974
3.08 | 633 ratings
Stormbringer
1974
3.22 | 533 ratings
Come Taste the Band
1975
3.52 | 630 ratings
Perfect Strangers
1984
2.89 | 405 ratings
The House of Blue Light
1987
2.70 | 332 ratings
Slaves And Masters
1990
2.78 | 350 ratings
The Battle Rages On...
1993
3.68 | 403 ratings
Purpendicular
1996
2.85 | 307 ratings
Abandon
1998
3.02 | 333 ratings
Bananas
2003
3.32 | 326 ratings
Rapture Of The Deep
2005
3.91 | 353 ratings
Now What?!
2013
3.60 | 146 ratings
InFinite
2017
3.76 | 87 ratings
Whoosh!
2020

DEEP PURPLE Live Albums (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

3.23 | 312 ratings
Concerto for Group and Orchestra
1969
4.52 | 708 ratings
Made in Japan
1972
3.81 | 107 ratings
California Jamming
1974
3.45 | 225 ratings
Made In Europe
1976
2.16 | 77 ratings
Last Concert In Japan
1977
4.37 | 140 ratings
Deep Purple In Concert
1980
3.37 | 68 ratings
Live in London
1982
3.22 | 71 ratings
Scandinavian Nights [Aka: Live and Rare]
1988
2.88 | 94 ratings
Nobody's perfect
1988
3.40 | 33 ratings
In The Absence Of Pink: Knebworth 85
1991
3.96 | 47 ratings
Gemini Suite
1993
4.22 | 76 ratings
Live In Japan
1993
3.40 | 81 ratings
Come Hell Or High Water
1994
4.67 | 9 ratings
On Stage: Black Night
1994
4.67 | 9 ratings
On Stage: Highway Star
1994
4.44 | 9 ratings
On Stage 1970 -1985
1994
3.61 | 33 ratings
Live in California 1976: On the Wings of a Russian Foxbat
1995
3.28 | 20 ratings
King Biscuit Flower Hour Presents Deep Purple In Concert
1995
3.48 | 23 ratings
MK III The Final Concerts
1996
3.70 | 49 ratings
Live At The Olympia 96
1997
3.27 | 81 ratings
In Concert With the London Symphony Orchestra
1999
3.96 | 25 ratings
Total Abandon
1999
2.59 | 28 ratings
This Time Around: Live in Tokyo '75
2000
4.25 | 8 ratings
Australian Tour 2001 - Wollongong
2001
3.40 | 15 ratings
Live At The Rotterdam Ahoy
2001
3.35 | 12 ratings
Kneel & Pray
2001
2.14 | 16 ratings
Space Vol 1&2 - Live in Aachen 1970
2001
3.40 | 15 ratings
Inglewood - Live in California 1968
2002
4.00 | 21 ratings
Live in Denmark 1972
2002
3.90 | 10 ratings
Perks And Tit
2004
3.73 | 32 ratings
Live In Paris 1975: La Dernière Seance
2004
3.13 | 6 ratings
Deep Purple with the London Symphony Orchestra and friends
2005
4.43 | 7 ratings
Australian Tour 2001 - Newcastle
2005
3.24 | 15 ratings
Live in Europe
2006
3.72 | 34 ratings
Montreux 1996
2006
3.80 | 25 ratings
Live at Montreux 2006
2007
4.13 | 8 ratings
Live at Montreux and in Concert
2007
2.74 | 16 ratings
NEC 1993
2007
3.84 | 25 ratings
Deep Purple with Orchestra - Live at Montreux 2011
2011
3.48 | 23 ratings
BBC Sessions 1968-1970
2011
4.48 | 29 ratings
Perfect Strangers Live
2013
4.00 | 4 ratings
The Now What?! Live Tapes
2013
3.91 | 22 ratings
The Official Deep Purple (Overseas) Live Series: Graz 1975
2014
4.15 | 26 ratings
Long Beach 1971
2015
4.13 | 16 ratings
From the Setting Sun... (In Wacken)
2015
3.81 | 16 ratings
...To the Rising Sun (In Tokyo)
2015
4.13 | 8 ratings
Long Beach 1976
2016
4.20 | 5 ratings
The Infinite Live Recordings Vol.1
2017
4.00 | 4 ratings
Live in Newcastle 2001
2019
4.40 | 5 ratings
Live in Rome 2013
2019

DEEP PURPLE Videos (DVD, Blu-ray, VHS etc)

2.55 | 10 ratings
Rises Over Japan
1976
2.62 | 12 ratings
The Videosingles
1987
4.67 | 15 ratings
Doing Their Thing
1990
4.18 | 11 ratings
Heavy Metal Pioneers
1992
4.50 | 20 ratings
Scandinavian Nights
1992
3.68 | 40 ratings
In Concert With The London Symphony Orchestra
1999
4.20 | 16 ratings
Total Abandon
1999
4.02 | 12 ratings
Bombay Calling
2000
4.50 | 4 ratings
Around the World 1995-1999
2000
4.00 | 16 ratings
New, Live & Rare - The Video Collection 1984-2000
2001
4.01 | 48 ratings
Come hell or high water
2001
4.23 | 41 ratings
Concerto For Group And Orchestra
2002
4.13 | 22 ratings
Perihelion
2002
3.66 | 33 ratings
Machine Head - Classic Albums
2002
4.64 | 11 ratings
Masters From the Vaults
2003
4.50 | 10 ratings
Live Encounters
2004
3.74 | 9 ratings
Rock Review 1969-1972
2004
3.63 | 8 ratings
Deep Purple's Made In Japan (Rock Milestones)
2005
4.79 | 48 ratings
"Live in concert 1972/73"
2005
4.16 | 41 ratings
Live in California 74
2006
3.29 | 5 ratings
Reflections
2006
4.09 | 25 ratings
Live At Montreux 2006
2007
4.50 | 10 ratings
Around The World Live Boxset
2008
4.60 | 5 ratings
Stormbringers - The Inside Story
2008
4.71 | 24 ratings
History, Hits, & Highlights
2009
4.00 | 17 ratings
Phoenix Rising
2011
4.83 | 12 ratings
Deep Purple with Orchestra - Live at Montreux 2011
2011
4.40 | 26 ratings
Perfect Strangers Live
2013
4.30 | 10 ratings
Deep Purple with Orchestra - Live In Verona
2014
4.40 | 10 ratings
From the Setting Sun... (In Wacken)
2015
4.42 | 12 ratings
...To the Rising Sun (In Tokyo)
2015

DEEP PURPLE Boxset & Compilations (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

4.63 | 8 ratings
Best of Deep Purple
1970
4.38 | 17 ratings
Purple Passages
1972
4.45 | 20 ratings
Mark I & II
1973
3.35 | 47 ratings
24 Carat Purple
1975
3.38 | 26 ratings
Powerhouse
1977
3.19 | 15 ratings
When We Rock, We Rock, and When We Roll, We Roll
1978
4.32 | 25 ratings
The Singles A's and B's
1978
4.17 | 12 ratings
The Mark 2 Purple Singles
1979
2.93 | 64 ratings
Deepest Purple - The Very Best Of Deep Purple
1980
4.50 | 6 ratings
Fireworks
1985
4.29 | 7 ratings
Greatest Purple
1985
4.00 | 2 ratings
The Anthology
1985
4.00 | 2 ratings
The Best Of Deep Purple
1987
4.50 | 4 ratings
Black Night - Best
1990
2.85 | 16 ratings
Knocking At Your Back Door: The Best Of Deep Purple In The 80s
1991
3.00 | 2 ratings
The Best of Deep Purple In Brazil
1991
3.89 | 18 ratings
The Compact Disc Anthology
1991
1.79 | 10 ratings
Progression
1993
4.16 | 19 ratings
The Deep Purple Singles A's and B's
1993
4.33 | 3 ratings
I Successi
1993
4.40 | 5 ratings
Soldier of Fortune: The Greatest Hits
1994
3.18 | 9 ratings
Smoke On The Water - The Best Of
1994
3.86 | 7 ratings
Child in time 1984-88
1995
4.25 | 4 ratings
The Collection
1997
2.18 | 12 ratings
Purplexed
1998
2.52 | 35 ratings
30: Very Best Of
1998
3.25 | 7 ratings
Under The Gun
1999
4.44 | 9 ratings
Shades 1968-1998 boxset
1999
3.67 | 6 ratings
Anthems
2000
4.00 | 5 ratings
Extended Versions
2000
3.17 | 15 ratings
The Very Best of Deep Purple
2000
4.08 | 6 ratings
On the Road
2001
4.33 | 6 ratings
The Soundboard Series
2001
4.60 | 5 ratings
Collectors Edition - The Bootleg Series 1984-2000 (12 CD)
2001
4.50 | 4 ratings
Very Best Deep Purple Album Ever
2001
4.00 | 6 ratings
In Profile
2001
4.62 | 13 ratings
Listen Learn Read On
2002
3.37 | 8 ratings
20th Century Masters: The Best of Deep Purple
2002
4.00 | 8 ratings
Singles Collection 68/76
2002
4.50 | 4 ratings
Winning Combinations split CD
2003
4.50 | 4 ratings
The Essential
2003
4.67 | 6 ratings
Purple Hits - The Best of Deep Purple
2003
2.64 | 9 ratings
The Early Years
2004
3.00 | 2 ratings
New Live & Rare
2004
4.08 | 14 ratings
The Platinum Collection
2005
4.50 | 4 ratings
The Ultra Selection
2005
1.73 | 4 ratings
The Deep Purple Collection
2006
3.50 | 5 ratings
Higway Stars
2006
3.36 | 5 ratings
Greatest Hits (Steel Box Collection)
2008
3.00 | 2 ratings
Gold - Greatest Hits
2009
4.56 | 9 ratings
Singles & E.P. Anthology 1968-1980
2010
3.00 | 2 ratings
Essential
2011
4.00 | 2 ratings
The Deep Purple Collection
2011
4.45 | 11 ratings
Now What?! (Gold Edition)
2013
4.30 | 10 ratings
Hard Road: The Mark 1 Studio Recordings 1968-69
2014
4.50 | 2 ratings
The Vinyl Collection
2016
4.00 | 7 ratings
A Fire in the Sky
2017
3.00 | 2 ratings
Classic Songs Live in Concert
2017

DEEP PURPLE Official Singles, EPs, Fan Club & Promo (CD, EP/LP, MC, Digital Media Download)

2.70 | 22 ratings
Hush / One More Rainy Day
1968
3.71 | 14 ratings
Kentucky Woman / Hard Road
1968
3.33 | 17 ratings
Emmaretta / The Bird Has Flown
1969
3.43 | 14 ratings
River Deep Mountain High / Listen, Learn, Read On
1969
3.34 | 20 ratings
Hallelujah (I am the preacher) / April (part one)
1969
4.54 | 26 ratings
Black Night/Speed King
1970
4.33 | 18 ratings
Speed King / Into the Fire
1970
2.70 | 11 ratings
Deep Purple In Rock
1970
4.13 | 23 ratings
Strange Kind Of Woman/I'm Alone
1971
4.30 | 20 ratings
Fireball
1971
4.09 | 11 ratings
April
1972
4.64 | 14 ratings
Black Night
1972
3.55 | 19 ratings
Never Before / When a Blind Man Cries
1972
4.60 | 20 ratings
Highway Star
1972
3.75 | 12 ratings
Super Trouper / Blood Sucker
1973
4.19 | 16 ratings
Woman from Tokyo
1973
4.60 | 20 ratings
Smoke On The Water
1973
4.31 | 16 ratings
Burn
1974
3.91 | 11 ratings
Might Just Take Your Life
1974
3.45 | 11 ratings
Lady Double Dealer
1974
3.50 | 8 ratings
You Can't Do It Right / High Ball Shooter
1974
3.92 | 12 ratings
Stormbringer
1975
4.10 | 10 ratings
You Keep on Movin'
1975
4.42 | 12 ratings
Child in Time / Smoke on the Water / Fireball
1975
4.00 | 6 ratings
New Live & Rare Vol. 2
1976
3.63 | 8 ratings
El vuelo del pajaro (The Bird Has Flown)
1977
4.00 | 6 ratings
New Live & Rare
1977
4.22 | 9 ratings
Black Night
1978
4.25 | 8 ratings
Burn
1980
3.83 | 6 ratings
New Live And Rare Vol.3
1980
4.25 | 12 ratings
Knocking At Your Back Door
1984
3.89 | 9 ratings
Nobody's Home
1984
4.23 | 13 ratings
Perfect Strangers
1984
4.14 | 7 ratings
Deep Purple
1984
3.80 | 5 ratings
Off the Record Special with Mary Turner
1985
4.14 | 7 ratings
Smoke On The Water / Living Wreck / No, No, No
1985
4.17 | 6 ratings
Black Night
1985
3.19 | 8 ratings
Bad Attitude
1987
4.14 | 7 ratings
Call of the Wild
1987
3.25 | 8 ratings
Hush
1988
3.25 | 8 ratings
Love Conquers All
1990
4.00 | 9 ratings
King of Dreams
1990
4.00 | 2 ratings
Fire in the Basement
1990
3.50 | 2 ratings
Tour Brasil '91
1991
2.67 | 9 ratings
The Battle Rages On
1993
4.00 | 8 ratings
Anya
1993
3.71 | 7 ratings
Time to Kill
1993
3.71 | 7 ratings
Talk About Love
1993
4.00 | 5 ratings
Anyone's Daughter / Speed King
1994
4.25 | 8 ratings
Black Night
1995
3.60 | 5 ratings
Aviator
1996
2.75 | 4 ratings
Hey Cisco
1996
4.59 | 8 ratings
Sometimes I Feel Like Screaming - Vavoom: Ted The Mechanic
1996
3.00 | 3 ratings
The Turtle Island Shuffle
1996
3.20 | 5 ratings
Don't Hold Your Breath
1996
3.40 | 5 ratings
Any Fule Kno That
1998
2.75 | 4 ratings
Don't Make Me Happy
1998
2.75 | 4 ratings
Whatsername
1998
4.00 | 4 ratings
Black Night (live Australia 1999)
1998
3.25 | 4 ratings
Smoke on the Water (live '99)
1999
2.83 | 21 ratings
Days May Come and Days May Go: The 1975 California Rehearsals
2000
4.00 | 10 ratings
1420 Beachwood Drive: The California Rehearsals Pt 2
2000
3.50 | 2 ratings
House of Pain
2003
3.50 | 2 ratings
Haunted
2003
3.33 | 6 ratings
Rapture of the Deep
2005
3.00 | 3 ratings
Rhino Hi-Five: Deep Purple
2005
3.67 | 6 ratings
Well Dressed Guitar
2005
3.50 | 2 ratings
Encore: Lucille / Maybe I'm a Leo
2012
3.50 | 6 ratings
All The Time In The World
2013
4.00 | 2 ratings
Vincent Price
2013
3.50 | 2 ratings
Above and Beyond
2013
4.50 | 2 ratings
Hell to Pay
2013
3.50 | 2 ratings
Out of Hand
2015
3.67 | 3 ratings
Johnny's Band
2017
4.10 | 10 ratings
Time For Bedlam
2017
4.00 | 9 ratings
All I Got Is You
2017
4.00 | 5 ratings
Limitless
2017

DEEP PURPLE Reviews


Showing last 10 reviews only
 Come Taste the Band by DEEP PURPLE album cover Studio Album, 1975
3.22 | 533 ratings

BUY
Come Taste the Band
Deep Purple Proto-Prog

Review by TCat
Forum & Site Admin Group Eclectic / Prog Metal / Heavy Prog Team

3 stars Prior to the release of "Come Taste the Band", Deep Purple had lost their iconic vocalist Ian Gillan a few years ago and had added the soulful vocals of David Coverdale, which basically changed the classic DP sound. However, sales were still positive and DP's management pushed for more tours and more albums. The band was getting worn out and Ritchie Blackmore hated the new sound, especially the line-up's 2nd album "Stormbringer". He hated the funky and soulful vibe the music had taken on so much that he left the band. Only two members, Jon Lord and Ian Paice remained from the famous Mark II line-up, and now they found themselves missing a lead guitarist.

Everyone know the story, and Tommy Bolin was hired to replace Blackmore, who had gone on to form Blackmore's Rainbow. Bolin had a background of having played for The James Gang and had released a solo album, so he was somewhat known. However, his guitar style was completely different. Coverdale and Hughes were now more free than ever to pursue their different sound for the band, and both of them were surprisingly open to allowing Bolin to help in writing the songs. Bolin was afraid that he wouldn't be able to handle the famous Blackmore solos, so he was allowed to make a huge contribution to the sound. Hence, the unique sound of this record among the other Deep Purple albums.

Many would argue (and still do) that this is not really a DP album. But, the fact is, it is a DP album. This album is a direct result of where the band was headed. The songs are heavy, lyrically driven, and, thanks to both Coverdale and Hughes, more soulful, funky and radio friendly. For me, the first side of the album is full of forgettable tracks, with nothing standing out much except for a cool, funky section of "Gettin' Tighter", which ends up being too short with the funkiness being quickly lost in Hughes smothering vocals. Coverdale and Hughes both had the same styles of voice, so other than that small section, even with two lead singers, the songs sound way too similar and nothing seems to pull the listener in.

Nothing much changes on the first half of the 2nd side of the album, it's just more of the same style, same smothering vocals and not enough in the instrumental area that would capture the love of the earlier fans. It's not until you get to the last two tracks that anything interesting happens. The first highlight comes in the "melody" track which still doesn't sound much like the DP of previous years, however, it is an excellent unique style that stands out from the rest of the repressed sound of the rest of the album. The best part is the 2nd part of the Melody which is called "Owed to G", an instrumental track that shows off Bolin's own playing and writing style, proving that it is much different from Blackmore's, and also proves that maybe without Coverdale and Hughes influence, Bolin really needed to be in a different band. The final track "You Keep on Moving" is also very good, with great hooks and an overall sound that stands out from the rest of the album.

None of the music on this album is progressive, but the last two tracks are good enough to raise this album up one star above the previous album "Stormbringer" which only had a nice looking cover going for it. Yes, CTtB ended up getting great sales at the beginning, but soon took a nosedive and ended up being one of DP's lesser known albums, with no singles that performed well and with sales dropping quickly. Bolin was correct in saying that he wouldn't be able to handle Blackmore's solos on the older songs that fans demanded be played in concert, and fans would "boo" when he messed them up. This whole thing was unfair for Bolin because he was a good enough guitarist, but he had his own style that was very unlike Blackmore's. Also, a lot of the blame can be put on Bolin's impairment due to his reliance on drug use, which would end up taking his life after he released his 2nd solo album soon after CTtB was released. The band ended up breaking up after this and management said they would not play together as DP again. It would be almost 10 years before DP would reappear, reuniting under the classic Mark II line-up again, and prove that this is really what the fans wanted.

In the meantime, you have this weak album that has two great tracks on it, but sounds nothing like the DP from before, and because of this, the fans and the band have basically disowned it. However, in my opinion, it is a little bit better than "Stormbringer", but still a long ways from the excellent material that was produced during the Mark II phase. It's a sad story and one that could have had a better ending if it had been released under a different name, but the public and management wanted the name for recognition. The album is not a complete throwaway, but it's not one that anyone should search high and low for. 3 stars.

 Burn by DEEP PURPLE album cover Studio Album, 1974
3.86 | 860 ratings

BUY
Burn
Deep Purple Proto-Prog

Review by TCat
Forum & Site Admin Group Eclectic / Prog Metal / Heavy Prog Team

3 stars Deep Purple was still riding high and even after the release of the disappointing and tired sounding "Who Do We Think We Are?", DP was still considered the top selling artist of 1973 in the States. The band, however, was exhausted from all of the touring and recording and emotions and egos were getting in the way. Gillan and Blackmore were not getting along, so Gillan left the band high and dry. If that weren't enough, Blackmore insisted that Glover (bass) be dismissed. This was risky business especially with the band doing so well.

After frequenting some "Trapeze" concerts, the band hired Glenn Hughes on the promise that they were considering Paul Rodgers ("Free") as a co-vocalist. Rodgers was busy starting the band "Bad Company" at the time, so he ended up passing on that offer. Instead, DP ended up hiring David Coverdale, who was unheard of at that time, but who would eventually be lead singer for "Whitesnake". With these two new additions, the band made what was probably their first major line-up change (all at one time) in their history. Of course, there was bound to be a major shift in the band's overall sound. That is exactly what happened.

"Burn" was the first studio album released with the new Mark III line-up. The sound was now shifted away from the heavy-blues-inspired psychedelic sound to a more soulful and rock-boogie style. Surprisingly enough, the band made the transition quite well at first, and this is apparent with this album, which turned out to sound much more relaxed and thought out than the previous album. The title track starts the album off on fast rocking note that would end up being the barn-burner that would replace "Highway Star" as the opener in their concerts. The double team of Coverdale and Hughes would give a nice variety to the sound with the both of them sharing lead vocal duties, sometimes within the same song. However, the both of them didn't have the explosive sound and range of Gillan. So while the music was more soulful, it seemed to be missing the drive and the punch that it used to have. Blackmore does seem to have more solo time on this studio album than before, but then Lord's solo time is cut back some, and the songs are more vocally driven than before. There is a noticeable lack of the excellent instrumental sections than there were previously, and even though listeners heard a bit of that in the previous album, now it seems to be the case more than ever.

The first half of the album, after the first track, demonstrates how that lack of drive could make their music sound too much the same, and there are only a few instances where anything really stands out. The 2nd half, however, is much better with "You Fool No One", "What's Goin' On Here" and "Mistreated" sounding like it was going to be easy to get used to this new sound, all three of these tracks being heavy, catchy and top notch performances. The last track "A 200" is an instrumental that, however, seems to lose any energy that was generated from those three tracks that precede it. However, the album sounds somewhat promising and is a step up from the previous album. There was a lot of hope here that things would continue to get better with this new line-up and this hopefulness was translated into continued high sales with this album and the follow up "Stormbringer", which would end up adding more elements of funk and soul while concentrating on shorter, more accessible tracks, something that would cause even more issues within the band. But, for now at least, the band looked like it might still be sitting comfortably.

In the end, there are 4 great tracks and 4 that are just good, with an ending track that leaves you wishing for something better. Yes it's better than "WDWTWA?", but not quite good enough to push it up to 4 stars in my opinion. Almost, but not quite.

 Made in Japan by DEEP PURPLE album cover Live, 1972
4.52 | 708 ratings

BUY
Made in Japan
Deep Purple Proto-Prog

Review by TCat
Forum & Site Admin Group Eclectic / Prog Metal / Heavy Prog Team

5 stars Many people have come to the conclusion that this is probably the best live album ever recorded. Its hard for me to ever say that any album is the best of any category as things often change for me according to the mood of the day, but I can go so far as to say that it is definitely one of the best live albums ever put together.

This double album captures Deep Purple at the height of creativity and popularity. Sure, most of their music is blues- based rock, but it is the way the band was able to perform and create around that foundation that made them one of the best in that style. The members are considered the classic Deep Purple line-up, or Mark II as many refer to them, with the amazing Ian Gillan on vocals, Ritchie Blackmore on guitar, Jon Lord on keys, Roger Glover on bass and Ian Paice on drums, all of which are well represented on this album. Everyone of them have dozens of opportunities to shine, and they do just that.

The other thing that makes this album so great is because it is DP doing what they did best, mixing tight song structures and looser improvised passages in everyone of the 7 extended tracks on the album. The album kicks off with the adrenaline-inducing rocker "Highway Star" and follows with the manic "Child in Time", the latter of which contains some longer instrumental and vocal sections than the original. The famous "Smoke on the Water" gets a live version that almost everyone is familiar with, and for many, is their favorite version of the song. Then, a long version of "The Mule" with a long drum solo follows this. For me, this track is the least engaging since drum solos never seem to transfer well to recorded music. The best way to experience a drum solo is to watch it live, so it always seems to weaken an album that retains a live drum solo when you can't actually see what goes into the solo.

"Strange Kind of Woman" follows in yet another extended version with more instrumental interplay, which is what DP is the best at. Then we get "Lazy", the one with the long, awesome instrumental introduction, which is even longer here and also probably the most varied version from the studio version on "Machine Head". I love both versions and it is great to hear such a varied version of this track that stays somewhat true to the original yet does it in a new and exciting way. Finally, the last track is the real show piece here, and that is a 20 minute version of "Space Truckin". When I first saw this album many years ago, I was leery of owning it because I had assumed that this was going track was going to feature a never-ending drum solo, because of how the original track was structured. It just always sounded like a set up for a live drum solo showpiece. But when I finally heard this, I realized that I was so wrong. The band moves through the familiar sound of the song, but then switches to this long, improvised (almost) set of space jams, psychedelic wanderings and crazy instrumental effects that proves that this is where their true love and strengths reside. If the rest of the album was mediocre, this track alone would be worth the price, but since the entire album is great, this only caps everything off with more greatness.

This was the peak of the band's career, coming off the major sales and exposure received worldwide from their masterpiece "Machine Head" and then to follow up with an excellent tour playing music they were always meant to play. Without the time limits of the usual album formats and label pressure to keep things abbreviated, the band was able to show what they were best at, the reason why they were such a great band in the first place by expanding their songs and displaying their talents better than they had ever been able to. DP had gotten better and better as they released each album and their growth is quite evident in the first several albums of their discography, even with line- up changes. The band was slowly adjusted until it reached the pinnacle of this time in their career. Unfortunately, after this album and the pressure of touring and recording, fissures started appearing in the band line-up. This would be quite evident in the next album "Who Do We Thing We Are?", which feels rushed, forced and much less inspired, let alone the fact that egos were really getting in their way. They were starting to feel like a group of individuals and less like an entire group working together. At least this amazing live recording is there to show us a snapshot of the band at it's best. It might not be up high in progressive rock elements, but it does touch on them, especially in the suite of styles and improvisation that make up the last track, but it is an essential live recording that should work as a standard as to what live recordings should sound and be like.

 Whoosh! by DEEP PURPLE album cover Studio Album, 2020
3.76 | 87 ratings

BUY
Whoosh!
Deep Purple Proto-Prog

Review by Antonio Giacomin

5 stars Whoosh !

Here we go again, another 'lbum by Deep Purple. It is a kind of an unexpected one, because there was a lot of talk even by members of the band about the proximity of their retirement. Expected or not, all I can do is congratulate these gentlemen about this achievement of theirs; which IMHO deserves a five star rating because of the quality of musical contend and the stubbornness of recording this music after so many decades on the road. Deep Purple went through a very particular path in the world of music. Led Zeppelin, the other band in the realm of heavy music that rivals their relevance, happened to be conducted by four tight members, each one matching perfectly others skills to the point that no personal interchange was possible to happen. While formidable on means of musical growth, it led (pun intended), to a dead end after Bonzo's death. When Deep Purple passed throughout a multitude of members, if on one side it creates issues of identity, on the other hand it opens a great opportunity for the band to reinvent themselves. And this is exactly and for a great good what happened when Steve Morse entered the band; consolidating excellence in the music present in albuns like 'Purpendicular', 'Now, What ?', and in 'Whoosh', this one.

What have we here in 'Whoosh', to talk about ? First of all one of the greatest opener that I have heard, no matter what band or genre we are talking about. When 'Throw My Bones' ends, the only thought that passes through my mind is the desire of hearing it again or, better, an extendend version with more interludes between Steve and Don. The other songs that promotes a rupture of their traditional sound (there was nothing much close to them in other albuns), are 'Nothing At All', 'Step By Step'and 'Man Alive'; and we must consider this last one to be preceeded and connected to 'The Power Of The Moon' and 'Remission Possible'.

That's all folks. The quality of the songs commented above, their innovation when we look throughout Deep Purple's career, and also the energy of recording this music being as old as they are explains this five stars rating. And, ok, I LOVE Deep Purple !!!!!

 InFinite by DEEP PURPLE album cover Studio Album, 2017
3.60 | 146 ratings

BUY
InFinite
Deep Purple Proto-Prog

Review by TCat
Forum & Site Admin Group Eclectic / Prog Metal / Heavy Prog Team

4 stars I guess it seems appropriate that Deep Purple would name their 20th studio album "Infinite" as it seems like their tenure might go on forever. Yes there have been line-up changes with musicians coming and going. In 2017, however, it seems like the line-up has stabilized as it has remained the same for several years now, though the album output has slowed a bit. With all of the live shows and studio sessions however, the band was feeling quite comfortable together. With a mix of old DP veterans and some impressive musicians that had replaced the DP staples such as Blackmore and Lord with Steve Morse and Don Airey, the band quickly adjusted to be able to convincingly play the classics, compose new songs that remained true to those classics and incorporate the styles of both Morse and Airey. This album would prove that this line-up was great, though some of the attempts to "update" their sound to the current sounds are a bit weak, overall, the songs are quite enjoyable and impressive.

DP is one of those bands that sparingly used progressive traits in place of their brand of blues-inspired hard rock pretty much through their entire career, so it should be no surprise that the progressive level is not present on most of the tracks here. The one exception falls right in the middle of the album and is called "The Surprising". This is most apparent in the instrumental section of the song with the cool riffs which include playing around with meter changes and goes from a nice hard-rock section to an ambient section. Then there is a bit of a reggae turn with the blues- tinged "Get Me Outta Here" where Gillan really shines.

On this album, the band also plays around a little with some nice effects. "Time for Bedlam" is the song that uses this quite well with some vocal effects applied to Gillan's vocals here and there and some nice songwriting tricks, but they still manage to retain the excellent expected instrumentation exchanges between organ and guitar. Don Airey proves he can do the Lord-style playing quite convincingly. Gillan's spirit also shows through with "Hip Boots" and Morse gets to show off during the instrumental break. There is even a level of soulfulness in "All I Got is You" which stands on its own and allows Airey to add in his own keyboard styling which fits in quite well on the album.

Yes there are lots of positives here, but there are some weaker tracks which really aren't that bad, they just don't stand out as much among the better tracks. Examples of this are "One Night in Vegas" which has some nice piano rock'n'roll chords and a bit of humor in the lyrics, but the track tends to get lost on the album. "Johnny's Band" is a fairly typical rock song about a rock band, not bad, but totally predictable and a bit less impressive, and this is followed by another standard track that contains no real surprises in "On Top of the World". On this latter song, Morse sounds like Morse, not someone else. However, there is a spoken word section on the last half of the track with an ambient base that just doesn't work.

"Birds of Prey" holds both predictable tricks and some less predictable ones (at least for DP). On one hand, it's become expected by this time on the album that when Gillan's vocals come in, the intensity tends to falter, and that happens a few times too many on this album. That is it's greatest fault. But the use of Airey's own style (not Lord's this time) and the unexpected minor to major chord change during the Morse solo (which he follows to the end of the song) make this track a standout. The last track is a The Doors cover "Roadhouse Blues". Gillan doesn't try to outdo Morrison here, and that is good. But the band handles the main riff (which I'm glad here that they retained that), throws in a harmonica and more piano honky-tonk style blues to carry out this cover quite well.

With a combination of some great albums and some not so great ones released since 1990, you never know whether you can count on each release to be great or not until you hear it. With this album, the band seems to fit together well and try some new things which sometimes works quite well and other times doesn't. But, overall, this is an enjoyable album that both convincingly reminds fans of the past but also keeps from being stale by trying new things. It seems this line-up does this better than it did in the latter years with Blackmore and Lord, who, even though they are amazing musicians, had a hard time stretching the boundaries beyond their usual sound. This is a case where if the band wanted to continue on into infinity, maybe some drastic changes were needed. In any case, this is a fun album and for the most part, a pleasure to listen to. It's a 3.5 star album that can be rounded up to 4 stars in this case.

 Shades of Deep Purple by DEEP PURPLE album cover Studio Album, 1968
3.30 | 585 ratings

BUY
Shades of Deep Purple
Deep Purple Proto-Prog

Review by Progressive Enjoyer

3 stars Deep Purple were a band that changed. A lot. In just two years they went from a psychedelic rock band to a much harder, heavier sound.

And this is where it all started.

With Rod Evans on vocals, unlike the later albums, "Shades.." brings something different to the table for fans. A softer, more engineered sound, with similarities to bands like cream and Vanilla Fudge.

When starting the album you're greeted to a minute strange, ambient noises. Eventually the track kicks off. For what it's worth, "And the Address" is a groovy, fun instrumental, although a minute could be cut off both the start and end. Next up is the hit single "Hush". And I must say, it's incredibly catchy, but alas, it's a cover, although a good one. The instrumentation, from Jon Lord and Richie Blackmore is very enjoyable here, although it's not heard as much, as this is a fairly polished and manafactured track. "One More Rainy Day" is a fairly well written song, although nothing special, serving as filler material for the album. But once again, Jon Lord's work here shines through. The final part on Side 1 is "Happiness/I'm so glad". The "Happiness" part is an instrumental that is just short of three minutes long, which I'd say is inferior to the first instrumental "And The Address", despite being more varied and more akin to more developed progressive rock. And finally, "I'm So Glad", a song which I feel is half baked at best, with a real lack of creativity in the lyrics, although you must give it some slack, as it's a cover of an old blues song (and before Deep Purple it was done by Cream). At 3:40 to 4:20 roughly, really shows Blackmore's skill, and I quite like some of the drums from Paice, and the keyboards from Jon Lord, which I'd say is somewhat similar to the work of Tony Banks on Genesis's "In The Cage" (Although Banks is on another playing field).

Side 2 opens up with "Mandrake Root" which is a fairly well made track (somewhat similar to "The Changelling" by The Doors\0. The main melody sounds like a slowed rendition of the opening track, which is very noticeable if you're paying attention. Eventually the track devolves into another instrumental of the same nature to "Happiness", and eventually, a listener is bound to get bored of the overdone amount of instumentals. "Help" is a cover of "Help!" by the Beatles. And it is excellent. It is beautiful and brilliant, turning what's normally a fast pace song, into a slow ballad of sorts, and for me, it's brought a new appreciation for the song, and is the definitive version of the song. The way that it picks up after the first "Won't You Please Help Me", is just beautiful, and on the album this is Rod Evans best performance and most suited song, the emotion he puts on his voice is an artistic wonder. Then the part at 3:50 is also an actually well done instrumental, unlike the previous which practically cut of a song. "Love Help Me" is a pretty good pop-rock song, and is fairly catchy, not nearly as much as hush though, and it somewhat makes me think of the beatles mixed with the ramones. To end it off, "Hey Joe". And it opens with the best instrumental of the album by a long way, although the singing section is nowhere near the quality of Hendrix's rendition, more on par with Love's.

Also, the outtake "Shadows" is good, but nothing to fuss about

For me, Deep Purple's first effort is ok, but it's not there best work. It is however, one of only three Psychedelic in Deep Purple's discography, and not the worst.

 Deep Purple by DEEP PURPLE album cover Studio Album, 1969
3.62 | 650 ratings

BUY
Deep Purple
Deep Purple Proto-Prog

Review by A Crimson Mellotron

3 stars Deep Purple's self-titled third album was released in June of 1969, in the very dawn of prog rock, a year that was marked by a shift from the then-massive psychedelia and blues towards a more experimental and challenging approach to creating music. Purple, however, did not yet fully embrace this newly-born and gradually gaining momentum direction; In fact, they finished off the decade with 'more of the same', to put it in a bit of ironic manner. This third studio record is a continuation of the band's psych-rock sound that is the significant trace of the Mark I lineup, gradually exploring some more straightforward songwriting, and also letting Jon Lord to finally present a classical crossover opus, not just some sketchy intros and outros.

A couple of very well-known songs among DP fans; These would, of course, include 'Chasing Shadows', 'Lalena' 'Bird Has Flown', and while speaking about the songs on the band's self-titled album, we have to say that the continue their fashion of presenting covers and original compositions (technically just one cover song - 'Lalena'). As much as I know this record is slightly better received than its two predecessors, this does not really reflect how I feel about it. It is not drastically different, this is certain, and for this reason it begins to sound a bit stale, with some good, ripe ideas, and some dull and directionless ones. Overall, I consider it an ok album, maybe a bit more tiring to listen to than the previous two Purple releases, but containing some enjoyable songs. And yes, I wonder what the band could have sounded like had they continued on in the 70s with Rod Evans on lead vocals, as they never got him to showcase his full and raw power, in my humble opinion. But these are just wonderous wonders. Listen, Learn, Read On!

 The Book of Taliesyn by DEEP PURPLE album cover Studio Album, 1968
3.22 | 563 ratings

BUY
The Book of Taliesyn
Deep Purple Proto-Prog

Review by A Crimson Mellotron

3 stars Deep Purple quickly followed up their decently-received debut album with 'The Book of Taliesyn', recorded some three months after the release of 'Shades of Deep Purple'. This second studio release by the then-up-and-coming British band expands on the psychedelic rock sound of its predecessor, this time throwing some hard rock and prog rock in the mix, as well as some classically-arranged episodes (mostly intros) by Jon Lord. As for the lineup, there are obviously no changes, as Rod Evans, Nick Simper, Ritchie Blackmore, Jon Lord, and Ian Paice embark on another psych-rock journey.

'The Book of Taliesyn' has a similar album structure as the debut album - comprised of original compositions, this time not reminiscing Vanilla Fudge that evidently, as well as some covers, with the band deciding to cover The Beatles, Ike & Tina Turner, and Neil Diamond. The quick scoop-up after the first album justifies the fact that the two do not sound dissimilar at all. It's just that 'The Book of Taliesyn' is better. The band sounds more in control, maybe more focused on what they want to achieve and showcase with these seven new songs, and maybe a tint more aggressive. This can easily be backed up by the loudness of songs like 'Listen, Learn, Read On', 'Wring That Neck' and 'Shield', all great tracks off Purple's second LP. Other highlights would be 'Kentucky Woman', one of the covers but also one of the songs that many have grown to love, and a rocker on which Rod Evans seems to enjoy himself even more than usual, and probably 'Exposition'/'We Can Work It Out', although I feel like this one and the third cover ('River Deep, Mountain High') are miles behind the band's original compositions this time, in terms of quality and energy.

So, to briefly sum it up, 'The Book of Taliesyn' is another really good album by Deep Purple, maybe not essential but an important part of their development as a massive rock act; Slightly better than the debut, as it is more refined, more enjoyable even, and a tad bit more focused. I would even go on and claim that this might be the best of the first trio of Deep Purple albums, all of which are very similar and at the same time hugely different from what would come out of this band in the 70s.

 Deep Purple in Rock by DEEP PURPLE album cover Studio Album, 1970
4.35 | 1257 ratings

BUY
Deep Purple in Rock
Deep Purple Proto-Prog

Review by TCat
Forum & Site Admin Group Eclectic / Prog Metal / Heavy Prog Team

4 stars The album "Deep Purple in Rock", released in 1970, marked an important place in Deep Purple history as it was the first studio album (#4 overall) to feature the most famous line-up of the band. However, it wasn't the first album to feature the line-up since the Mark II line-up would appear for the actual first time on the live album "Concerto for Group and Orchestra", which tends to get overlooked by many. "In Rock" would be the first time most people would hear this new line-up together, though, in reality, only two members were "new" to the line-up, that would be Ian Gillan (vocals) and Roger Glover (bass).

The band definitely had something to prove with this new line-up as the band moved away from the more meandering, psychedelic based rock to a heavier, more blues-focused hard rock, and prove it they did. Right from the outset, when the needle drops into the first groove of the record, the beginning of "Speed King", the listener gets a blast of guitar noise and over-the-top organ. Then when Gillan begins his wild singing style, fans new and old alike knew they were in for some uncompromising rock unlike anything the band had played on earlier studio albums. Many concert goers were already used to this no-hold-barred hard rock, but since the band had yet to reach their pinnacle of popularity, that didn't include too many people. And as the first three tracks continue, the band seems determined not to leave any doubt. Their decision to do an album so heavy and loud turned out to be a good one as Ian's maniacal singing opened the public's ears to some extreme possibilities especially when the crazy guitar and organ stylings of Blackmore and Lord were added to the mix.

This sound would continue through "Bloodsucker" and the ever famous "Child in Time", the first being quite riff heavy and the latter being what starts out as a ballad of sorts, but is actually a slow, boiling build up to a climax (not once, but twice) that paints a picture of complete lunacy, and Gillan plays (and sings) the part so well. Even now, it's been hard to match the degree of extreme singing that is present to this point on the album. In fact, the singer must have been told to tone it down after this album as it does seem more restrained in future albums, and Gillan would not reach this extreme level of singing again until he appeared on Black Sabbath's "Born Again" album.

So, all of this power and emotion promises an amazing album. Unfortunately, the album seems to lose a lot of it's strength after this. Even Gillan seems less animated and the instrumentals suddenly less dynamic and interesting. Yes there are some high points spread throughout, and "Into the Fire" has some moments, but these last four songs seem less memorable and only moderately enjoyable. That probably wasn't so much the case back when it was released, but now it doesn't seem to hold that level of excitement. Nevertheless, this was the beginning of something quite wonderful, and even with Gillan mostly under control in future albums, the band's masterpieces were still to come anyway. This is a great album even so, and should be considered on of the band's best in their classic repertoire, but it doesn't quite reach the "essential" status that it starts to allude to in the first three tracks. It's still worth it though, and still a great album.

 Fireball by DEEP PURPLE album cover Studio Album, 1971
3.79 | 872 ratings

BUY
Fireball
Deep Purple Proto-Prog

Review by prog_traveller!!

4 stars Ian Gillan on vocals, Ritchie Blackmore on guitar, Jon Lord on keyboards, Ian Paice on drums and Roger Glover on bass. These are the names of the 5 heroes who in 1970 brought to the world what is still considered one of the greatest rock records of any era. This shining gem was called "Deep Purple In Rock", a gem that, at 50 years is still recognized as a model to follow. How can this work be equal? Deep Purple in 1971 tried to give the answer to this enigma, and launch their fifth album on the market in an absolute sense, but according to if we take In Rock as their year 0, album called "Fireball". Recorded between the end of 1970 and the first half of the following year, the story gives "Fireball" a rather thankless role, namely that of transition between the aforementioned monster set to music and the subsequent equally monstrous "Machine Head". The result of these two works was also that of often putting "Ball of fire" in a sort of limbo, of oblivion, an entry that, however, only a madman, among those who believe they have a good musical knowledge, could do.

Yes, because even this work, although it does not shine like its two illustrious brothers, deserves to be scrupulously followed and acclaimed. Released in two versions, one European and one Japanese / American (in which a song on the tracklist changes), this album is once again the solid testimony of how much the 5 composers were able to churn out, with almost annoying continuity (obviously for the few detractors), products that were a fusion of melody, technique, power and so on in a precious whole, a whole that rightly delivers them, now as in the past, on a hypothetical podium of the greatest bands of their period ( let's indicate it as the early 70s, since the Purple line up would have changed in a few years). It is useless to talk about instrumental technique, everyone knows their "chickens", we only reiterate how Blackmore was brilliant and influential on the whole genre (Stratocaster, Rainbow and so on), of how Gillan has established himself as one of the most powerful singers vocal of the genre (Eric Adams owes him a lot), of how Lord is deservedly and universally recognized among the greatest keyboard players of all time. Not to mention the compositional and executive genius of Roger Glover and Ian Paice. It is Ian who is perhaps the one who feels the most on this record, the main musician, capable of keeping the rhythms and dictating the times perfectly both in the slowest sections and in the furious rides, always in a workmanlike manner. Since we have said technique, let's go through the tracklist of this work a bit. Above all the titletrack emerge, a very fast jewel that not everyone remembers, and the majestic "The Mule", of which there is also a superb reinterpretation in the monolithic live "Made in Japan". But if these are the "90" songs, don't forget that there are 5 others (6 if we consider both versions of the product) to keep an eye on, so let's see them.

The aforementioned Fireball is the opener of the album of the same name. A great drumming leads us to a very fast but well balanced and not overwhelming piece. You immediately notice how fundamental the drums are, perfectly dominated by Paice, which is followed closely by the guitars and the bass. Gillian proves rather contained, to explode every now and then with a very high and direct timbre but at the same time clean and without smudges. Great bridge, tasty refrain, headbangesche verses, classy solo (keyboard, among other things), what more could you want? Nothing really, and in fact Fireball is definitely my favorite track of all the platter, platter that continues with the valid, even if inferior, "No no no". Less exuberant than the previous one, this song is a mid tempo where above all an excellent bass emerges, interspersed with a guitar / keyboard duo, creating an atmosphere of suspense. Everything (including peaceful solo) is excellently linked, as neither of the two "sides" dominates the other, but acts as an excellent complement, creating pleasant tempo changes. What can I say, it will not be phenomenal, but No no no it has a great relaxing power, and this does not taste, after the previous outburst. The third song is that of the division: in fact, if "Demon's Eye" is featured on Euroversion, "Strange Kind of Woman" is repeated on the USA / Japan one, also included on Made in Japan. Although the two tracks are substantially different from each other, neither of them prevails over the other in beauty (it is a competition of more than good quality), so we might as well hear them both, perhaps on the remaster that took place on the occasion of the 25th anniversary of the band, where they are both present. Strange but fabulous "Anyone's Daughter", which at the beginning ranges between fragments of simultaneously different songs (including carousels, drums and more, which almost seem to simulate a person who is turning the radio channels) and then fossilize on a quick song but that it includes incredible and decidedly country melodies, melodramatic and lightheartedness, virtuosity but above all the magic of Blackmore and Lord, who here are spectacular, four minutes and forty-one of mastery. If we also add a decidedly inspired song, an unmissable song comes out, which despite being basically an interlude, is listened to dozens and dozens of times without ever getting tired, and acts as a curtain for one of Deep Purple's masterpieces, the great "The Mule ", perhaps one of the greatest studio performances by a Hard Rock drummer. Here Paice is truly terrifying, creating incredible times at all possible and imaginable speeds, without ever missing a beat. The others are also good at forming this beautiful song, long and with a great atmosphere but, turn around, everything revolves around the performance of the historic drummer (and for a drummer it is no small thing). I don't say anything else, practically everyone knows the song, given the numerous versions in which it is present, for those who have not heard it I only recommend to fill a really serious gap. Sixth but not least slow "Fools" that interprets very well (in principle) the style of the major ballads of the early seventies.

Initial driver Lord, who is the master in this sweet melancholy, Lord who then leaves room for the other 3 instrumentalists, when the track becomes decidedly more powerful (central section, where Gillan screams all his anger), to close in a dark way, on scales very low. Last track of Fireball is the rapid "No one Came", probably the least successful of the seven sisters of the disc, certainly the one I like least, but equally many bands can only imagine. End the music and returning to the oblivion speech made at the beginning I say: when you dust your CD cases, or rearrange them, when you arrive at Deep Purple check that you have Fireball among the discs in your possession. It's true it's not a milestone, but there aren't many CDs like that out there. Remember who we are talking about.

Thanks to Raff for the artist addition. and to Quinino for the last updates

Copyright Prog Archives, All rights reserved. | Legal Notice | Privacy Policy | Advertise | RSS + syndications

Other sites in the MAC network: JazzMusicArchives.com — jazz music reviews and archives | MetalMusicArchives.com — metal music reviews and archives

Donate monthly and keep PA fast-loading and ad-free forever.