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KEN HENSLEY

Prog Related • United Kingdom


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Ken Hensley biography
Kenneth William David Hensley - Born 1945-08-24 (Plumstead, UK)

Doubtless one of the most favored musicians, Ken Hensley have the ability to play keyboards (especially Hammond B3 an expensive model by the way), guitar, singing with an excellent tone and in addition an excellent composer, that he has influenced to generations of musicians and fans to the progressive rock. Ken Hensley was born 24 from August of 1945 Hertforshire, England. Showing from his childhood an extraordinary gift musician. In the mid 60's he would form a called group "THE GODS", which also included stars of the caliber of Mick Taylor and Greg Lake, recording two albums, which now are very looked by the collectors. From ashes of this group another merges with the name of Toe Fat, which in its first album participates Hensley next to a young Lee Kerslake and Cliff Bennett, once outside the group he was invited by Paul Newton to be member of another called group: "Spice" in which also are Mick Box and David Byron, this in 1969; changing the name in 1970 to URIAH HEEP. In Uriah Heep, Hensley it passed ten years playing keyboards and guitar, as well as providing more than 70% of the compositional material that would make famous to this band, the very evocative, nostalgic and sentimental lyrics they were easily identifiable by astute listening, that without a doubt is songs that have supported the test of the time well.

Besides the previous success Ken Hensley have to record several solo albums, which much more reflect the style characteristic of composition and musical quality that Ken Hensley have. In 1973 he recorded its first album as a soloist, call Proud Words are to Dusty Shelf", which was made accompany by the rhythmical base of Uriah Heep, Gary Thain and Lee Kerslake, feature subjects of great musical quality, like the great "Fortune" which is a mini epic of and evocative musical sounds capes, as well as the characteristic "When the Evening Comes", which has an excellent guitar licks, as well as an evocative lyric of past and future moments, love and sadness, "King Without to Throne" with characteristic and powerful bass playing in charge of Thain and an exquisite sticky melody that Hensley delights to us, among others songs of great musical invoice. In 1975 Eager to Please was his sophomore album, which is an ...
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KEN HENSLEY discography


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KEN HENSLEY top albums (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

3.40 | 5 ratings
Head Machine: Orgasm
1970
3.45 | 11 ratings
Weed: Weed...!
1971
3.52 | 39 ratings
Proud Words On A Dusty Shelf
1973
3.15 | 32 ratings
Eager To Please
1975
2.73 | 21 ratings
Free Spirit
1981
2.65 | 13 ratings
A Glimpse of Glory
1999
2.54 | 16 ratings
Running Blind
2002
3.58 | 15 ratings
The Last Dance
2003
3.37 | 13 ratings
The Wizard's Diary - Vol. One
2005
2.69 | 10 ratings
Cold Autumn Sunday
2005
3.52 | 24 ratings
Blood On The Highway
2006
3.71 | 17 ratings
Ken Hensley & Live Fire: Faster
2011
3.40 | 5 ratings
Love & Other Mysteries
2012
3.44 | 9 ratings
Ken Hensley & Live Fire: Trouble
2013

KEN HENSLEY Live Albums (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

3.97 | 10 ratings
The Hensley | Lawton Band - The Return
2001
3.15 | 8 ratings
Ken Hensley & John Wetton. More Than Conquerors
2002
4.00 | 1 ratings
Live Tales
2013
4.00 | 4 ratings
Ken Hensley & Live Fire - Live!!
2013
4.00 | 1 ratings
Ken Hensley & Live Fire - Live In Russia
2019

KEN HENSLEY Videos (DVD, Blu-ray, VHS etc)

3.50 | 2 ratings
The Hensley | Lawton Band. Salisbury Live In Concert (VHS + CD)
2001
4.00 | 7 ratings
More Than Conquerors (with John Wetton) (DVD)
2002
4.00 | 1 ratings
Live Fire (Ken Hensley with Live Fire in Concert, Norway)
2007
4.17 | 6 ratings
Blood on the Highway - The Exclusive Release Concert
2008

KEN HENSLEY Boxset & Compilations (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

3.50 | 4 ratings
The Best of Ken Hensley
1990
3.56 | 10 ratings
From Time To Time
1994
3.96 | 5 ratings
The Anthology
2000
4.00 | 2 ratings
Elements. Anthology 1968 to 2005
2006
2.25 | 3 ratings
Inside The Mystery
2006
4.67 | 3 ratings
Rare & Timeless
2018

KEN HENSLEY Official Singles, EPs, Fan Club & Promo (CD, EP/LP, MC, Digital Media Download)

3.00 | 1 ratings
Cold Autumn Sunday
1973
0.00 | 0 ratings
In the Morning
1975
0.00 | 0 ratings
When Evening Comes
1975
0.00 | 0 ratings
No More
1980
0.00 | 0 ratings
The System
1981
0.00 | 0 ratings
Lady in Black
2003
0.00 | 0 ratings
Free Me
2004

KEN HENSLEY Reviews


Showing last 10 reviews only
 Cold Autumn Sunday by HENSLEY, KEN album cover Singles/EPs/Fan Club/Promo, 1973
3.00 | 1 ratings

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Cold Autumn Sunday
Ken Hensley Prog Related

Review by Heart of the Matter

— First review of this album —
3 stars "Cold Autumn Sunday", the A side to this very good single, is taken from "Proud Words On A Dusty Shelf", Ken's first solo album, originally recorded in 1973 and released on the Bronze label. After a balladesque piano supported beginning, the thing evolves rapidly into a more rocking paced number, propulsed by the solid rythmic base, which, to nobody's surprise, is played by fellow Uriah Heepers Lee Kerslake on Drums, and Gary Thain on bass.

On the B side, Ken resorted to a little trick: even when "Rain" is part of the same album as the previous song, it was already taken from "The Magician's Birthday", Uriah's fifth album (released in November 1972). Anyway, a nice piano/vocal, synth wrapped ballad.

 Proud Words On A Dusty Shelf by HENSLEY, KEN album cover Studio Album, 1973
3.52 | 39 ratings

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Proud Words On A Dusty Shelf
Ken Hensley Prog Related

Review by Psychedelic Paul

5 stars KEN HENSLEY (born 1945) is the thundering keyboard powerhouse that drives the High and Mighty sound of URIAH HEEP. He's been involved with a number of "very 'eavy, very 'umble" bands during his early years, including two albums with The Gods: "Genesis" (1968) and "To Samuel a Son" (1969), one album with Head Machine: "Orgasm" (1969), a self-titled album with "Toe Fat" (1970), and another self-titled album with "Weed" (1971). Ken Hensley appeared on thirteen Uriah Heep albums in a row, from their first album, "Very 'eavy, Very 'umble" in 1970, right through to their "Conquest" album in 1980, when he left the band he'd founded shortly afterwards due to the age-old band problem of "artistic differences". In the mid-1980's, Ken Hensley appeared on two albums with the American Southern Rock band Blackfoot: "Siogo" (1983) and "Vertical Smiles" (1984). He's also recorded two Live albums each in 2001 and 2002 with his two former Uriah Heep bandmates, John Lawton and John Wetton. More recently, he's recorded two studio albums under the name Ken Hensley & Live Fire: "Faster" (2011) and "Trouble" (2013). Ken Hensley launched his solo career in 1973 with "Proud Words on a Dusty Shelf", when he was still very much the driving force behind Uriah Heep. Two of Ken's Uriah Heep bandmates featured on the album: Gary Thain on bass and Lee Kerslake on drums. He's since recorded eight more studio albums with his most recent solo album "Love & Other Mysteries" arriving in the record stores in 2012. It's time now to take Ken Hensley's loud and proud first solo album off the shelf and blow off the dust and wipe away the cobwebs and give it a listen.

The album opens in magnificent style with a tremendous power ballad: "When Evening Comes". Ken Hensley is in fine voice here and he's a very accomplished guitarist too, as he demonstrates here with some phenomenal soaring power chords and glittering glissandos. This dramatic refrain is just as strong and powerful as anything Uriah Heep have ever done, representing a dazzling entrance onto the solo stage for Ken Hensley which he can feel justly proud. Stunning debut albums like this one only come along "From Time To Time" and that's the title of our next song. It begins as a gentle strumming acoustic guitar number and blossoms out into a high and mighty passion play of stupendous sonic splendour, in true Uriah Heep style. Think of the magnificent majesty of "July Morning", and that's the kind of epic song you have here, only without David Byron's extravagant high-pitched vocals. When the dynamic keyboards appear at the midway point, that's when the song really reaches up into the stratosphere. It's back down to earth for "A King Without a Throne", a fairly routine and plodding Blues- Rock number without any great Demons and Wizards keyboard histrionics. It's time to put the umbrella up now for "Rain", which features Ken in full romantic balladeer mode. It's a gorgeous piano ballad featuring these moving heartfelt lyrics:- "It's raining outside but that's not unusual, But the way that I'm feeling is becoming usual, I guess you could say, The clouds are moving away, Away from your days, And into mine." ..... The moment when the gorgeous choir joins in is truly inspirational. This mellifluous romantic melody is guaranteed to brighten up the dullest of rainy days. We've reached the halfway point now with "Proud Words", a rousing and rollicking rock & roll song with a boisterous attitude. Ken Hensley's clearly not in the mood to stand for any nonsense here as he loudly and proudly urges us all to:- "Stand up and fight, Or you'll lose your right, Do you want to stand in a line, Fightin' hard to hold on to your mind." ..... It's a rockin' good song to close Side One, which sounds like a rousing call to arms.

We've struck lucky and hit musical gold with "Fortune", a resonant reverberant refrain with High and Mighty Ken Hensley at his exhilarating and exuberant best. It's a true Return To Fantasy in a glorious Wonderworld of classic Uriah Heep pomp and passion. It's a song with all of the storming power of a tank rolling across Salisbury Plain. This is where we get to hear the booming and bombastic sound of Ken Hensley having the Sweet Freedom to do what he does best of all - delivering dynamic and dramatic Hard Rock with all of the explosive power of a stick of TNT. It's very 'eavy, but not so very 'umble. There's a nice change of pace for "Black Hearted Lady", an uplifting romantic ballad with Ken Hensley wearing his heart on his sleeve with these bittersweet lyrics:- "Reading between the lines I find, You don't mean what you say, You cheated and you lied, And how you made me hurt inside, You turned my days into darkest nights, And re-arranged my dreams, You're just not what you seem, Black-hearted lady." ..... It sounds like Ken was writing from bitter personal experience with those emotionally-wrought lyrics. It's time to "Go Down" now for a lovely acoustic guitar ballad. It's a charming heart-warming song carried along on a harmonious wave of rich golden guitar chords and with Ken Hensley in fine impassioned voice. In an album that's choc-a-bloc full of great songs, the penultimate song "Cold Autumn Sunday" represents the highlight of the album. It's a passionate power ballad that pulls out all the stops, featuring a glittering display of stratospheric guitar riffing and a rousing honey-voiced choir that's guaranteed to lift the spirits up into the heavens. This is THE BIG anthemic number on the album with all of the grandiose splendour and magnificent majesty of a great royal occasion. And finally, here comes the real shocker..... Ken Hensley goes Country! Yes, really! "The Last Time" is the last song on the album and it's a twangy Country song, adding a countrified string to Mr Hensley's versatile musical bow - although it's hard to picture Ken Hensley wearing a Stetson hat and cowboy boots.

"Proud Words on a Dusty Shelf" is a magnificent debut for Ken Hensley and it's an album that any discerning connoisseur of classic Prog-Rock can feel proud to have on their dusty shelf. You don't HAVE to be a Uriah Heep fan to love this stunning album, but it might help. It's not as hard and heavy as Uriah Heep, but it's an album bursting at the seams with pride and power and romantic passion.

 Weed: Weed...! by HENSLEY, KEN album cover Studio Album, 1971
3.45 | 11 ratings

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Weed: Weed...!
Ken Hensley Prog Related

Review by The Jester

3 stars Review # 103 Weed was a project, that included German musicians and Ken Hensley of Uriah Heep. They released only this album and then disappeared. Their music style is the typical classic Rock of the 70's (with Prog hints), with lots of organ and guitar riffs.

The opening track, Sweet Morning Light, is one of the album's highlights, and a personal favorite. It also gives the listener a good idea of the band's sound. Lonely Ship that follows is a very sweet ballad, including acoustic guitar; Also a very nice song. I won't get into details for each song separately, I just mentioned the first two, in order to give you a small idea.

All the songs are good but don't expect anything special. This is an album that you will appreciate, but you won't go nuts with it. If you like the classic Rock sound of the early 70's, give it a try. My rating: 2.5 stars

 Ken Hensley & Live Fire - Live!! by HENSLEY, KEN album cover Live, 2013
4.00 | 4 ratings

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Ken Hensley & Live Fire - Live!!
Ken Hensley Prog Related

Review by TenYearsAfter

4 stars For me Ken Hensley is a Hammond Hero, I grew up with the legendary Uriah Heep albums Salisbury, Look At Yourself and Live, and I still love that exciting Heavy Prog music! In 2000 I witnessed a gig from Ken Hensley, with singer John Lawton, I was blown away by Hensley his stage presence: with the unsurpassed Hammond organ but also using the acoustic - and slide guitar and his pleasant vocals. So when I read about this interesting Live Fire project I was very eager to listen to their double live CD.

The setlist contains tracks from the Live Fire studio albums, Hensley his solo work and of course the Classic Heep era. Well, Hensley and his excellent band have done a great job, I did not only enjoy the Classic Heep versions but in fact all other songs. Hensley deliver his awesome work on the omnipresent Hammond organ, especially in Circle Of Hands, the epic and compelling July Morning and psychedelic sounding, extended Stealin' (in fact the only Hammond solo during this concert). But also tender piano runs, in the wonderful The Last Dance and moving ballad Rain, really very beautiful. Another strong element on this 2-CD is the guitarwork: a long and moving solo in The Cruse, exciting wah wah in the crowd pleaser Look At Yourself, Stealin' and the Heep Headbanger Gypsy (blistering sound), slide guitar (by Hensley?) in Circle Of Hands and The Last Dance and warm acoustic rhythm guitar in The Wizard and the folky Lady In Black . And the interplay with the keyboards is outstanding during the entire concert, recorded in 2012 in Switzerland and Germany. Unfortunately not in Holland. I would have enjoyed it very much, almost on the same level as last year with Uriah Heep during their Look At Yourself Anniversary tour.

So check out this 2-CD if you like Uriah Heep or Heavy Prog/harder-edged melodic rock.

 Eager To Please by HENSLEY, KEN album cover Studio Album, 1975
3.15 | 32 ratings

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Eager To Please
Ken Hensley Prog Related

Review by Gatot
Special Collaborator Honorary Collaborator

3 stars The second album of Ken Hensley is not bad at all and again in some ways are very similar with Uriah Heep music as he wrote many songs for Uriah Heep. The opening track "Eager to Please" (4:51) even though it sounds like straightforward rock but there is a change of tempo in the middle of the track.. "Stargazer"(Clarke/Bottomley) (3:46) i sexperimental in nature as there is an orchestrtaed brass section throughout the song. It's not a bad idea as the music is bit becoming cheerful. As some people might say that Ken Hensley's solo is basically Uriah Heep minus Mick Box, I can agree with them as the style is Heep while the vocal is very similar with any Heep song.

Probably one of my favorites from this album is Take and Take (Hensley) (3:42) where the vocal harmony reminds me to duet Byron - Hensley that is unique Uriah Heep sound. The song has a good melody. But unfortunately the end is fading out - something that actually I do not like. "Longer Shadows" (Hensley) (3:32) is a track with acoustic guitar rhythm section while "In the Morning" (Clarke) (2:34) is a cheerful track in pop-rock style with good guitar work.

Overall, it's a good solo album by Ken Hensley. One of the reasons I enjoy playing this album is the sound quality that really represents the seventies despite good musical composition. Keep on proggin' ...!

Peace on earth and mercy mild - GW

 Proud Words On A Dusty Shelf by HENSLEY, KEN album cover Studio Album, 1973
3.52 | 39 ratings

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Proud Words On A Dusty Shelf
Ken Hensley Prog Related

Review by Gatot
Special Collaborator Honorary Collaborator

3 stars For those who were there in the glory days of rock music : the seventies, it's hard to understand if this album was not well known. At least there were two songs that were major hits at that time: When Evening Comes and Rain (played by Uriah Heep as well). Some people mention that this was originally intended as Uriah Heep album. Well, I don't blame them as in some ways it has similarities with Uriah Heep.

One thing I was impressed with this legendary album was the fact that Hensley could paly guitar very well - at least during the opening track When Evening Comes. This track was really well known at that time and it became major hit in local radio. One thing I like about this song was the bluesy style it has and of course it has solid memorable melody through the voice of Hensley. The next track "From Time to Time (Hensley)" (3:37) is like Heep music; the vocal is powerful. This one lays the rhythm section on acoustic guitar and keyboards. "A King Without a Throne (Hensley)" serves like a ballad with a straightforward composition. Another hit "Rain" is a very nice one to enjoy. In some ways I prefer the one played by Heep but this one is also very enjoyable. The combination of piano and vocal line is really excellent. "Proud Words (Hensley)" is a straight rocker with nice vocal line. Well, Hensley voice is really excellent. Overall, I recommend this album to those who love straight forward rock combined with good vocal harmonies. If you are Heepmania, you must have this album. Keep on proggin' ...!

Peace on earth and mercy mild - GW

 A Glimpse of Glory by HENSLEY, KEN album cover Studio Album, 1999
2.65 | 13 ratings

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A Glimpse of Glory
Ken Hensley Prog Related

Review by kev rowland
Special Collaborator Honorary Reviewer

3 stars Ken Hensley must be one of the most important rock keyboard players of the Seventies, not only defining the sound of, but also writing many of Uriah Heep's songs. After he left the band some twenty years ago Ken stayed active in the scene for a while before going into musical semi-retirement and it is only in the last few years that he has again become involved. This album has been recorded with his band Visible Faith, but unfortunately there is no information in the 'booklet' or press release stating who played on this album, but it does appear to have been recorded at various times over the last few years.

What is striking is that this is a gospel album, and I wasn't sure what to expect when I placed it on the player. When gospel is bad, it can be nauseating, but when the songwriter is one of the ability of Ken then it probably isn't surprising that not only is this one of the finest albums of this genre that I have ever heard, but also not a bad listen in its' own right. I have to admit that I was somewhat surprised when I caught myself singing the chorus to "Jesus (Again and Again)" at work today, more than once, as it is not the sort of thing that I would usually do!

Ken has covered most of the musical bases that gospel albums tend to be like, only whereas most other acts stick to one style he moves around. Some are soft rock, with that wonderful Hammond organ of his, and some steel guitar for good measure while others are much more American-style, almost C & W. Considering that after he left Uriah Heep they recorded 'Abominog' (a fine cover indeed), it seems that he has moved on quite a way from his colleagues but songs such as "Shakey Ground" could have been from late Seventies Heep.

I have enjoyed playing this album a great deal, and know that I will be listening to it a lot more in the future which is some statement for any album, let alone one so blatantly stating the message. There is another album due out on Mystic anytime now and I am really looking forward to it if the quality of this one is anything to go by.

Originally appeared in Feedback #68, Jun 02

 Blood On The Highway by HENSLEY, KEN album cover Studio Album, 2006
3.52 | 24 ratings

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Blood On The Highway
Ken Hensley Prog Related

Review by Easy Livin
Special Collaborator Honorary Collaborator / Retired Admin

4 stars I remember

Sub-titled "When too many dreams come true", "Blood on the highway" is the musical autobiography of Ken Hensley in his role of keyboard player, second guitarist, second vocalist, and principle songwriter with Uriah Heep. Often written very literally, the album is paradoxically intensely personal, while generously sharing the performance duties more than on any other solo Hensley album. It seems that this time around, Ken wanted to ensure that the album quality would not be compromised through him trying to do everything himself. Consequently we have a succession of gifted vocalists, including Glenn Hughes, Jorn Lande, Eve Gallagher and former Uriah Heep lead singer John Lawton. Instrumentally, while Ken's multiple talents are well utilised, a fine array of guest musicians appear throughout.

It would have been tempting for Hensley to simply try to make another Uriah Heep album, and tracks such as "You've Got It (The American Dream)", which covers the band's rapid success in the US, and "Okay (This House Is Down)" certainly feel like Heep songs. There is though a fine diversity to the music which, while generally upbeat, explores a diversity of styles, with fine melodies being the common denominator.

At times, Hensley delves into his own songbook, borrowing themes from songs such as "July Morning" and "Free me" (both on " We're On Our Way"), but such indulgences are done with admirable subtlety, complementing rather than forming the main melody. The main lead guitar refrain in "It Won't Last" sounds similar to that on the fine "Come back to me", a song Ken co-wrote with Lee Kerslake, both being sung by John Lawton.

Personal favourites include the superb opening song "(This Is) Just The Beginning", and the prog leaning "The Last Dance (El Gitano Viejo)", a track which first appeared on Hensley's 2003 album of that name. Eve Gallagher's fine vocals on "It Won't Last", a song which I took to pay tribute to the late David Byron, are Tina Turner like.

"There comes a time" is a first rate Hensley ballad, complete with sax and ah-ah vocals. "I did it all" is touchingly reminiscent of David Byron's "I remember", where Byron also reflected on his time in the band. Here, "I did it all" is a wonderful ballad with orchestration and one of Hensley's finest vocal performances. Poignantly, the song ends with the lyric "I did it all, and now at last I'm doing fine".

The version of "The last dance" here is different to that on the album of that name, with Glenn Hughes taking over lead vocal. This epic piece features a slide guitar solo similar to that on "The spell" before building to its mighty crescendo.

Overall, a remarkable album from one of rock's genuine talents. Hensley has been through a lot in his life, often as he readily admits of his own making. He is though a survivor who has come to terms with his past. This rites of passage lays out the story of his time in one of the world's great bands, telling the story with admirable frankness. The fact that he does so through a bunch of songs which are melodically excellent, and musically rewarding results in an album of great courage and credibility. It's also a damn good listen.

 The Wizard's Diary - Vol. One by HENSLEY, KEN album cover Studio Album, 2005
3.37 | 13 ratings

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The Wizard's Diary - Vol. One
Ken Hensley Prog Related

Review by Tarcisio Moura
Prog Reviewer

3 stars Acsording to the CDīs booklet the idea of re-recording some of Uriah Heepīs classics came from Eugene Kultonov from at Sony Music in Moscow. Hensley then visit the studio facilities there and found it good enough to record there with the help of russian musicians and the Presidential Symphony Orchestra. It may sound a little opportunistic, doesnīt it? But, what the hell, what UH fan would not like to see some classics done by the author himself? So I was curious enough to buy it. And, like anyone else here that heard the record, I got mixed feelings about it.

First of all there are few new arrangements. Most of the time what you hear are very good and very respectful musicians that play each classic literally note by note as they were originally recorded. Even the addtion of the orchestra didnīt change things much. There are few exceptions, the most notably being Lady In Black (ok) and Stealinī(interesting, but it became too long and not as good as the original). Thatīs not bad. But it contradicts the recordīs premise to give the songs new versions. Second, Hensley does have a voice that is close enough to David Byron, although not with the same range and power. Still, he is singing as good as in the 70īs, if not better. And he is not trying to imitate the late vocalist. I also loved the full use of the Hammond organ (he is a master of this instrument!)

The selection is a sensitive point. Everybody would like to see different ones chosen. The surprises here are the inclusion of such obscure tracks like Illusion and Feelings. The latter sounds quite different in the vocal lines. ON the other hand the inclusion of a song like rain is quite odd, since it had been recorded twice already, with UH and on his first solo album. The new version differs little from both, making it quite unnecessary to say the least. But I was glad he included the forgotten gem Sweet Freedon, one of his most beautiful and soulful tunes. Like the classic July Morning (also covered, of course), the new recording does not change much and miracously keep the orignal feeling and magic. Even the backing vocals seemed to be careful arranged to duplicate the originals.

Conclusion: a nice selection, most of them quite faithful to the originals and with a superb production. You judge. For me it was a good efford. The few exceptions did not supass the old ones, but only Stealinīwas really bad. teh recording of some less known trakcs was a nice idea and I hope that next time (the title of this CD leads us to expect at least one more sequel, doesnīt it?) he wil do it again. Valid, well worth the efford, but not really essential. Final rating something between 3 and 3,5 stars.

 Blood On The Highway by HENSLEY, KEN album cover Studio Album, 2006
3.52 | 24 ratings

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Blood On The Highway
Ken Hensley Prog Related

Review by ZowieZiggy
Prog Reviewer

3 stars I have always found difficult to analyse solo albums from artists who were part of one of my beloved bands. This is the reason why I will only review one Peter Gabriel album on this site. The deception was major, and so for lots of great men in rock music.

Ken is part of these persons for whom I have the deepest respect for their work, but while he was one of the key players (without play on words) in the great Heep, I was not really moved with his solo output. Such masterpieces he wrote! Such superb Hammond organ parts he played! While in the Heep, though.

This last album to date is somewhat more rocking than usual (which is a very good news), but the AOR style takes the lead for the majority of the songs; and you might know that this is not my cup of tea, at all.

You can find some good rock songs, some good melodies, some good guitar breaks. Yes. You can find these?But don't expect any masterpiece song on this album. Decent FM rock music ("You've Got It") is not too bad but didn't we expect more from the man? At least, I was; even if I consider this "Blood On The Highway" as one of his best studio albums ever released.

Good rock ballads ("It Won't Last"), weak ones ("Think Twice") or syrupy ones ("There Comes A Time"). These three songs really form a rather weak middle part which is fortunately saved by an excellent and quite dynamic "Okay". Fully in the vein of the great "Easy Livin": this is my preferred song from this offering (but I'm biased). Even some "Highway Star" feel can be noticed at the end.

I was quite excited to listen to the great Glenn Hughes on two tracks from this album, but I have to say that I was not really thrilled by the song writing available druing "What You Gonna Do". His input is much more worth during the excellent remake of "The Last Dance".

I rate this is album with three stars (which is slightly upgraded to be honest). There is no prog relation to be found, but some good good rock moments for sure.

Thanks to Alberto Muņoz & easy livin for the artist addition. and to Quinino for the last updates

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