Progarchives, the progressive rock ultimate discography

KLAUS SCHULZE

Progressive Electronic • Germany


From Progarchives.com, the ultimate progressive rock music website

Klaus Schulze picture
Klaus Schulze biography
(aka Richard Wahnfried) - Born August 4th 1947 (Berlin, Germany) - died April 26th 2022

KLAUS SCHULZE, one of the most illustrious exponents of the kraut-electronic musical current, was born right in Berlin, the heart of the entire action. Before getting to know him as a master of electronic music, Schulze proved to be a skillful and talented young musician (with studies in modern composition at the Berlin University), hard to recognize (nowadays, perhaps) in the underground scene of the 60s. He first of all learned to play the guitar, starring afterwards in several bands as a bassist or a percussionist. His evolution in these ensembles can't be considered essential, still shows the consistency of moving up ahead: from the Düsseldorfian dance group Les Barones and cover-bands frenzied about Rolling Stones to the rock group Psy Free and, finally, to the moment when, from being invited by Edgar Froese to perform as a guest in his band, covering for the absence of the original drummer(I don't know if we're talking yet of Tangerine Dream, perhaps it actually concerns The Ones), he became a full, "registered" member of the group. TANGERINE DREAM's debut, though mainly a first solid album launched three years after the band (or the concept of it) started to form, is Electronic Meditation, the only one including Klaus Schulze. In a nebulous, experimental work, noisy and stoned, such as this one, the best thing we can notice is how Schulze adds flavor and intensity, through hallucinating percussion cliques, to a music that's anyway minimalistic, chaotic and instinctual.

Immediately after his singular appearence in Tangerine Dream (there's a mention about a similar guest appearence in AMON DÜÜL II, in a 1969 concert) - a specific moment turning out to be just as unique in TD's music - the next big step for Schulze is founding the band called ASH RA TEMPEL, together with two other young masters of that time, Manuel Göttsching and Hermut Enke. The boys bought equipment that was very similar to that used by Pink Floyd, a super-band for which the three had, apparently, a special affectio. The Ash Ra Tempel debut is however much more "drenched", being a stimulating example of kraut-rock, on the space, slow experimental, acid side. Many concerts follow afterwards. Schulze leaves though again...
read more

KLAUS SCHULZE forum topics / tours, shows & news


KLAUS SCHULZE forum topics Create a topic now
KLAUS SCHULZE tours, shows & news Post an entries now

KLAUS SCHULZE Videos (YouTube and more)


Showing only random 3 | Show all KLAUS SCHULZE videos (1) | Search and add more videos to KLAUS SCHULZE

Buy KLAUS SCHULZE Music



More places to buy KLAUS SCHULZE music online

KLAUS SCHULZE discography


Ordered by release date | Showing ratings (top albums) | Help Progarchives.com to complete the discography and add albums

KLAUS SCHULZE top albums (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

3.58 | 189 ratings
Irrlicht
1972
3.70 | 172 ratings
Cyborg
1973
3.45 | 168 ratings
Blackdance
1974
3.77 | 143 ratings
Picture Music
1975
4.22 | 334 ratings
Timewind
1975
3.75 | 214 ratings
Moondawn
1976
3.97 | 142 ratings
Body Love (OST)
1977
4.27 | 350 ratings
Mirage
1977
4.00 | 131 ratings
Body Love - Vol. 2
1977
4.07 | 274 ratings
X
1978
3.20 | 121 ratings
Dune
1979
3.07 | 92 ratings
Dig It
1980
3.31 | 76 ratings
Trancefer
1981
3.28 | 98 ratings
Audentity
1983
2.81 | 57 ratings
Angst (OST)
1984
2.48 | 37 ratings
Klaus Schulze & Rainer Bloss: Drive Inn
1984
1.71 | 28 ratings
Klaus Schulze, Rainer Bloss ‎& Ernst Fuchs: Aphrica
1984
3.63 | 21 ratings
Transfer Station Blue
1984
2.86 | 51 ratings
Inter*Face
1985
2.70 | 47 ratings
Dreams
1986
2.93 | 38 ratings
Klaus Schulze & Andreas Grosser: Babel
1987
3.34 | 59 ratings
En=Trance
1988
2.47 | 45 ratings
Miditerranean Pads
1990
3.08 | 47 ratings
Beyond Recall
1991
2.31 | 32 ratings
Le Moulin De Daudet (OST)
1994
2.69 | 34 ratings
Pete Namlook & K. Schulze: The Dark Side Of The Moog
1994
2.45 | 24 ratings
Goes Classic
1994
1.43 | 25 ratings
Totentag
1994
2.98 | 26 ratings
Pete Namlook & K. Schulze: The Dark Side Of The Moog II
1995
2.98 | 26 ratings
Pete Namlook & K. Schulze: The Dark Side Of The Moog III
1995
3.82 | 66 ratings
In Blue
1995
2.71 | 24 ratings
Pete Namlook & K. Schulze: The Dark Side Of The Moog IV
1996
3.14 | 41 ratings
Are You Sequenced?
1996
3.12 | 28 ratings
Pete Namlook & K. Schulze: The Dark Side Of The Moog V
1996
3.48 | 25 ratings
Pete Namlook & K. Schulze: The Dark Side Of The Moog VI
1997
2.72 | 27 ratings
Dosburg Online
1997
3.62 | 30 ratings
Pete Namlook & K. Schulze: The Dark Side Of The Moog VII
1998
2.44 | 25 ratings
Pete Namlook & K. Schulze: The Dark Side Of The Moog VIII
1999
3.15 | 24 ratings
Pete Namlook & K. Schulze: The Dark Side Of The Moog IX
2002
3.06 | 26 ratings
Pete Namlook & K. Schulze: The Dark Side Of The Moog X
2005
3.51 | 62 ratings
Moonlake
2005
3.56 | 18 ratings
Vanity Of Sounds
2005
3.71 | 17 ratings
The Crime Of Suspense
2006
3.57 | 28 ratings
Ballett 1
2006
3.62 | 21 ratings
Ballett 2
2006
3.74 | 23 ratings
Ballett 3
2007
3.40 | 20 ratings
Ballett 4
2007
3.76 | 95 ratings
Kontinuum
2007
3.49 | 65 ratings
Klaus Schulze & Lisa Gerrard: Farscape
2008
3.74 | 26 ratings
Pete Namlook & K. Schulze: The Dark Side Of The Moog XI
2008
3.81 | 24 ratings
Virtual Outback
2008
3.61 | 47 ratings
Shadowlands
2013
3.67 | 15 ratings
Another Green Mile
2016
3.72 | 18 ratings
Klaus Schulze & Solar Moon System: Ultimate Docking
2017
3.68 | 25 ratings
Androgyn
2017
3.20 | 24 ratings
Silhouettes
2018
3.89 | 9 ratings
Cocooning
2018
3.31 | 10 ratings
Timbres Of Ice
2019
4.08 | 22 ratings
Deus Arrakis
2022

KLAUS SCHULZE Live Albums (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

3.04 | 52 ratings
Live
1980
2.69 | 50 ratings
Dziekuje Poland (with Rainer Bloss)
1983
3.58 | 33 ratings
The Dresden Performance
1990
3.73 | 26 ratings
Royal Festival Hall Vol. 1
1992
3.78 | 30 ratings
Royal Festival Hall Vol. 2
1992
3.47 | 30 ratings
The Dome Event
1993
3.23 | 21 ratings
Das Wagner Desaster-Live-
1994
3.89 | 18 ratings
Live @ KlangArt 1
2001
3.76 | 17 ratings
Live @ KlangArt 2
2001
3.38 | 27 ratings
Rheingold - Live at the Loreley
2008
3.88 | 16 ratings
Live @ KlangArt
2008
3.36 | 23 ratings
Dziekuje Bardzo - Vielen Dank
2009
3.27 | 26 ratings
Big in Japan
2010
4.00 | 7 ratings
Big In Europe Vol. 1 Warsaw
2013
3.67 | 6 ratings
Stars Are Burning
2014
4.14 | 7 ratings
Big In Europe Vol. 2 - Amsterdam
2014

KLAUS SCHULZE Videos (DVD, Blu-ray, VHS etc)

4.03 | 20 ratings
Rheingold - Live At The Loreley
2008
3.82 | 11 ratings
Dziekuje Bardzo
2009
4.18 | 11 ratings
Big in Japan
2010

KLAUS SCHULZE Boxset & Compilations (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

4.00 | 2 ratings
Discover Cosmic - The Klaus Schulze Sessions
1977
4.00 | 2 ratings
Rock On Brain
1979
4.00 | 2 ratings
Mindphaser
1981
4.00 | 2 ratings
Star Action
1983
4.00 | 2 ratings
History
1988
3.14 | 7 ratings
2001
1991
3.89 | 9 ratings
Silver Edition
1993
3.45 | 12 ratings
The Essential: 72-93
1994
4.00 | 14 ratings
Historic Edition
1995
4.00 | 8 ratings
Jubilee Edition
1997
2.60 | 5 ratings
Trailer
1999
3.88 | 8 ratings
The Ultimate Edition
2000
3.60 | 10 ratings
Contemporary Works I
2000
3.67 | 12 ratings
Contemporary Works II
2002
3.60 | 5 ratings
The Evolution of the Dark Side of the Moog
2002
3.50 | 2 ratings
Best of Klaus Schulze
2009
3.39 | 19 ratings
La Vie Electronique 1
2009
3.86 | 18 ratings
La Vie Electronique 2
2009
2.87 | 19 ratings
La Vie Electronique 3
2009
3.09 | 19 ratings
La Vie Electronique 4
2009
3.22 | 17 ratings
La Vie Electronique 5
2010
3.97 | 19 ratings
La Vie Electronique 6
2010
2.53 | 15 ratings
La Vie Electronique 7
2010
3.35 | 14 ratings
La Vie Electronique 8
2010
3.45 | 11 ratings
La Vie Electronique 9
2011
3.36 | 11 ratings
La Vie Electronique 10
2011
3.33 | 12 ratings
La Vie Electronique 11
2012
3.93 | 14 ratings
La Vie Electronique 12
2012
4.06 | 16 ratings
The Schulze-Schickert Session
2013
4.33 | 6 ratings
La Vie Electronique 13
2013
3.83 | 6 ratings
La Vie Electronique 14
2014
4.50 | 8 ratings
La Vie Electronique 15
2014
4.40 | 5 ratings
La Vie Electronique 16
2015
4.14 | 7 ratings
The Dark Side Of The Moog Vol. 1-4
2016
4.29 | 7 ratings
The Dark Side Of The Moog Vol. 5-8
2016
4.63 | 8 ratings
The Dark Side Of The Moog Vol. 9-11
2016
4.00 | 10 ratings
Privée (with U.S.O.)
2016
3.83 | 6 ratings
Ballett 1 & 2
2017
4.00 | 6 ratings
Ballett 3 & 4
2017
4.38 | 8 ratings
Eternal
2017
3.50 | 2 ratings
La Vie Electronique Volume 1.0
2018
4.00 | 1 ratings
La Vie Electronique Volume 1.1
2018
4.00 | 1 ratings
La Vie Electronique Volume 1.2
2018

KLAUS SCHULZE Official Singles, EPs, Fan Club & Promo (CD, EP/LP, MC, Digital Media Download)

4.00 | 1 ratings
Macksy
1985
3.00 | 3 ratings
Conquest of Paradise
1994
4.00 | 1 ratings
Voices in the Dark
1996
5.00 | 1 ratings
Essential Extracts
2000
3.75 | 4 ratings
Andromeda
2003
3.75 | 4 ratings
Ion
2004
2.70 | 10 ratings
Come Quietly - with Lisa Gerrard
2009
3.00 | 3 ratings
Hommage À Polska
2009

KLAUS SCHULZE Reviews


Showing last 10 reviews only
 Deus Arrakis by SCHULZE, KLAUS album cover Studio Album, 2022
4.08 | 22 ratings

BUY
Deus Arrakis
Klaus Schulze Progressive Electronic

Review by Dapper~Blueberries

5 stars It is a hard fact to see a legend of electronic music leave us this year. I really loved his work on the early Tangerine Dream albums, he just had a way of making musical landscapes at his whim, so hearing him leaving the world was pretty sad to say the least. However he was making an album before his death, and it's finally here. The last project of Klaus Schulze is a hard thing to say, but even after death, I guarantee this final work of Klaus Schulze will be as enjoyable as his other ones he has done in the past.

The album starts with Osiris, an 18 minute 4 piece suite. Klaus always had a sort of knack for creating a tranquil and spacey feel in his songs, and these aspects helped shape his music all these years into what we now know and love today. Osiris definitely continues the mantle of the spacey, sci-fi soundscapes. I also love how each part takes their time in exploring these intricate soundscapes. Each part feels distinct from one another, but they all share the same core composition. Speaking of which, the composition in this song is just very beautiful. Every little bit of ambience, feels, and technicalities all create a song that really drives home Klaus' work effort and what he did for a living. The cool tranquilities of the synths, the weird yet boundless keyboard playing, and the beautiful composition and mixing work really makes this song a master class of New Age and Progressive Electronic music. It is the beauty of this album.

The next track, Seth, is a 7 part, 30+ minute suite. Where Osiris was based in beauty, Seth feels sad and anxiety driven. It has a layer of mystery unkempt by chains of traditional feelings new age usually provokes. I really love this more gothic and surreal take on the notably happy and whimsical genre of new age, making it feel almost haunting. As much as it is mysterious and cryptic, it also feels very chilled in its direction. It has a great vibe going on, creating a beautiful and surreal soundscape that is as much as it is almost cryptic as it is beautiful. With how long the song is too, it really explores this weird and surreal environment to the furthest it can possibly go, making each part feel like pieces straight from either a horror film or a post apocalyptic love story. The fourth part hits the hardest with that violin. It feels almost like a funeral is being held in space. Sadly fitting due to what transpired earlier this year. However while it is sad, I do feel though of it being a comforting experience, one which brings a calming experience despite the cryptically arranged compositions telling otherwise. Something majestic in a new light.

And lastly is Der Hauch des Lebens, a 5 piece suite. This one is particularly intriguing since it goes for pure ambience. This song is a very chilling sounding song that feels almost otherworldly. The feelings I get here seem almost horror like, and with the whole space feel this whole entire album gives off, something ambient, vast, creepy, and deep fits perfectly with the feel the album gives off and I think is a pretty suitable closing for this album that I feel as not only one of the best in Prog Electronic music, but also one of the best this year. It really drives home how big and vast life truly is and whether we should fear it or embrace it, but with Klaus Schulze's passing, I feel as though embracing the unknown can be more rewarding then not.

I know this wasn't my longest review yet, but this album really is something special. It is ethereally beautiful in how it delivers its soundscapes perfectly and how Klaus managed to make this a texturally wonderful album enriched with magnificent beauty, cryptic feels, and cool vibes really shows a testament to how good his work is and how grand of a figure he truly is. I'd say this is a must listen if you want something different from this year and also if you want some great ambient and New Age music.

 Deus Arrakis by SCHULZE, KLAUS album cover Studio Album, 2022
4.08 | 22 ratings

BUY
Deus Arrakis
Klaus Schulze Progressive Electronic

Review by admireArt
Prog Reviewer

4 stars Evocative, yet I can not run with the idea that Klaus Schulze is just a shadow. Long run and lost, his presence persists. Kind of a great work this "Deus Arrakis" 2022. He held his spirit, and came with a record that is , far from his very commercial efforts to a close glimpse of his findings. Yes it sounds like a movie track, but it is not, it is a somewhat of a legacy ,the cello, Wolfgang Tiepold (cello from the archives), the kind that´s fresh & very much K.S. The flow of his sequences, his melodies, as told a great P.E. musician. RIP. (to be continued)....
 Deus Arrakis by SCHULZE, KLAUS album cover Studio Album, 2022
4.08 | 22 ratings

BUY
Deus Arrakis
Klaus Schulze Progressive Electronic

Review by Heart of the Matter

4 stars With Deus Arrakis, Klaus Schulze was steering back his music to a former source of inspiration located in the Dune sci-fi saga. In effect, he had already released in 1979 the album Dune, and in 1978 a track named Frank Herbert, after the author of the novels. Even Hans Zimmer took its bass line for the soundtrack of the new screen version.

And the return trip ocurred at a sonic level too, since the familiar soundscape of scintillating sequencers plagued with mutating rhythmic patterns, drowned under droning and flowing synths slowly and majestically posing layers upon more layers, is still in place here. Of course, that soundscape suits perfectly to, lets say, an endless succession of sunrises and sunsets in Arrakis, the mysthic planet inhabited by mysterious people and gigantic worms going underground like express trains.

The first suite, Osiris, fortunately sounds more like the calm and extatic contemplation of that beauty, than like a struggle with worms.

The second one, Seth, seems to be devoted to a more "terrestrial" view, with a touch of human emotion added by the cello part, played by Wolfgang Tiepold. An oriental (mid-eastern?) mood pervades the piece.

The third one, Der Hauch des Lebens (the breath of life), features a more organic feel, with sounds reminiscent of air, water and earth, imprinted like watermarks in the instrumental (and now also vocal) sonic textures.

 Irrlicht by SCHULZE, KLAUS album cover Studio Album, 1972
3.58 | 189 ratings

BUY
Irrlicht
Klaus Schulze Progressive Electronic

Review by Glaessel

5 stars During the second half of the 1960s Germany lived with a music scene heavily influenced by American and English references. The records came with labels indicating the positions obtained in the charts of those countries and this was enough to attract the attention of the general public.    In the underground scene, the scene was quite different, several groups sought their own non-commercial musical identity and were influenced by artists and innovative scenes from other countries, such as the minimalism (repetition, variation of phrases, sequences) of the Americans Morton Subotnik, Terry Riley and Steve Reich or the emergence of the electroacoustic music of Pierre Schauffer, Edgar Varèse, Karlheinz Stockhausen and John Cage, based on the sound manipulation of magnetic tapes, natural or industrial noises, also influenced by the atonalism of the late 19th century, which ended up unfolding in two movements: Musique Concréte in France and Elektronische Musik in Germany.
   Within this scenario, several experimental groups were formed incorporating minimalist, electroacoustic, experimental, and lysergic references, since in rock, groups and musicians incorporated these references, such as the Beatles, Pink Floyd, and Frank Zappa. 
   Klaus Schulze begins his musical experiments in groups like Psy Free between 67-69, then Tangerine Dream between 69-70 and finally Ash Ra Tempel between 70-71, but very quickly loses interest because of the difficulties and endless discussions about the directions, concepts and future approaches of the music of each group.    Irrlicht has great affinity with the concepts of the French Musique Concréte. It was composed using random recordings made by Klaus during rehearsals for the Colloquium Musica Orchestra and a modified organ, which, according to Klaus himself, broke down soon after the recordings. For its release, it ended up taking advantage of Edgar Froese's relationship with Rolf-Ulrich Kaiser, who was an executive at Ohr and a big betting enthusiast for experimental music artists, and who had released Tangerine Dream's Electronic Meditation on the label.    Irrlicht, in German, has the same meaning as will-o-the-wisp, jack-the-lantern, ignis fatuus, or in Portuguese fogo fátuo, which is that phenomenon of combustion of decomposition gases that occurs in places like swamps, marshes, garbage dumps, and even cemeteries, usually visible only at night.    Having said all this above, it is not so difficult to imagine the sound of the album, lots of organ, many recording effects, reverberation effects, orchestral insertions, and all permeated by a dark and highly dramatic ambience that develops throughout the tracks. 
   Guaranteed trip.

Translated with www.DeepL.com/Translator (free version)

 Dune by SCHULZE, KLAUS album cover Studio Album, 1979
3.20 | 121 ratings

BUY
Dune
Klaus Schulze Progressive Electronic

Review by octopus-4
Special Collaborator RIO/Avant/Zeuhl,Neo & Post/Math Teams

3 stars No big worms, maybe some spice...

The first track, a 30 minutes instrumental, despite being formally inspired to Frank Herbert's novel has a Kosmische imprinting. When i bought the original vinyl, I didn't even know that Dune was a novel and the sensation that the 30 minutes actually gave me was more about a space travel. It starts with some electronic sounds and takes more than 5 minutes before getting to a proper chord, but this is exactly what we can expect from this kind of music. I want to add that in 1979 his former band, TANGERINE DREAM, was already about to enter the world of movie soundtracks. Their "Pink Period" was gone. Klaus, instead, still shows the mood of ZEIT which for my tastes is an added value.

So, even if it fails to recall a hot desert with subterranean caves full of Fremen, this is an excellent Kosmische track.

The B side of the LP is quite different. The base is a loop in the style of TD's Virgin period, not too distant from Phaedra, even if not THAT good. Quite surprisingly, it also features lyrics sung by ARTHUR BROWN. Surely, DUNE is a crazy world, and the lyrics are quite consistent with the novel as they are about the vision of future of Muad'dib. This, of course, is something I was unable to understand on my first listens.

While I'm writing, the new Schulze album has recently been announced, and its title is "DEUS ARRAKIS". It may be a follow up to this one. We'll see.

Back to 1979's Dune, it's not a masterpiece, but it's pleasant enough for who likes the genre. You don't need to have read the book to enjoy it.

 Dig It by SCHULZE, KLAUS album cover Studio Album, 1980
3.07 | 92 ratings

BUY
Dig It
Klaus Schulze Progressive Electronic

Review by Progfan97402
Prog Reviewer

4 stars It's clear this is the start of the '80s as far as Klaus Schulze is concerned. Clearly not a continuation of Dune. While he still used tons of his old gear at this time, on this album he didn't bother and instead used exclusively the GDS computer (and some help with percussion and drums). Trancefer only proved he returned to the old gear augmented by the GDS (and likely newer stuff too). "Death of an Analogue" is definitely prophetic as far as the title goes (by 1985 it's was difficult to find any analog synths being used, digital was in full force by then). This was recorded digitally (Hawkwind's Levitation, released around the same time, was recorded digitally, and so were several other albums since 1979 including Ry Cooder, Stevie Wonder, True Myth). It definitely has a more minimalist abstract approach, and probably not the best way to start the album, as I wished there was more development. It's nice hearing the vocoder, though. "Weird Caravan" is an odd one, as he basically explore reggae, electronic style. I actually found this one more enjoyable than "Death of an Analogue", I guess his exploration into reggae. Don't worry, he didn't go all Bob Marley on us, it's still instrumental electronic, it's that he included reggae rhythms in this piece. "The Looper isn't a Hooker" is truly one of the album's highlights, as he really soars here. "Synthasy" is one of his slow droning pieces that seems to be his trademark, so it's closest to the classic Schulze sound you're going to get here.

I needed to point out that it's hard not to think that Dig It is to Klaus Schulze what Stuntman is to Edgar Froese. Both albums were clearly departing from the 1970s going for a more 1980s sound with a digital approach. Edgar's album came first, a year before Dig It. While Edgar was still using some of his old gear (the Mellotron clearly not one of them) he used new state-of-the-art digital gear (most notably a PPG synthesizer). Schulze used the Crumar GDS mainly, and he went one step further by recording this album digitally. And like both albums there are modern 1980s digital synth sounds that sound easily pass for a Yamaha DX-7, two to three years before the DX-7 hit the markets.

Thanks to the crystal clear digital production and recording, if it weren't for the occasional snap, crackle and pop on my used vinyl copy (original orange Brain pressing), I could have easily sworn I was listening to a CD (the CD did not exist in 1980, although it was obviously reissued on CD many years later).

In conclusion, I'm surprised how good 3/4 of this album is (with "Death of an Analogue" being my least favorite). I generally dread the 1980s given how so many electronic artists of the '70s had started to explore either synth pop or New Age by the 1980s. Seems that Klaus Schulze simply updated his sound and explored new ground with Dig It, but did it rather well. Surprisingly good, despite the opening cut.

 Pete Namlook & K. Schulze: The Dark Side Of The Moog XI by SCHULZE, KLAUS album cover Studio Album, 2008
3.74 | 26 ratings

BUY
Pete Namlook & K. Schulze: The Dark Side Of The Moog XI
Klaus Schulze Progressive Electronic

Review by hieronymous

4 stars This is the eleventh and final installment in the DSOTM series. It has dark, ominous grooves and wild soloing on (electric guitar- sounding) synth and what sounds like actual electric guitar. The soloing is something I associate with Klaus Schulze and his role in the Dark Side of the Moog series, but actually I don't know who's playing what. Are the grooves by Namlook and the non-repetitive stuff by Schulze? It's actually fine not knowing, as much as there is virtuosity in this set, it's not about the spotlight, it's about the mood(s). There are only four pieces on this album (only three tracks on the CD, the surround version splits the music into four tracks) ? the first three pieces are fairly extended, two being close to 20 minutes, but they are actually quite engaging, slowly shifting but becoming quite intense in places. Part IV contains some bird sounds and sounds like a field recording from outside the studio during a break - a peaceful ending to an album that would turn out to be the last due to Namlook's untimely death at age 51 in 2012. Definitely an excellent representative of the series - if you've heard others this one shouldn't disappoint, and if you're not familiar then this would be a fine place to start.
 Blackdance by SCHULZE, KLAUS album cover Studio Album, 1974
3.45 | 168 ratings

BUY
Blackdance
Klaus Schulze Progressive Electronic

Review by siLLy puPPy
Collaborator PSIKE, JR/F/Canterbury & Eclectic Teams

5 stars Once KLAUS SCHULZE left Tangerine Dream after playing drums on the band's debut "Electronic Meditation," he set out to craft a solo career and there was no looking back. SCHULZE mastered the art of crafting some of the most innovative electronic techniques that paralleled his former band but sounded light years away. During the early years SCHULZE not only created some of the most unique progressive electronic sounds in all of Germany but also collaborated with other artists such as Ash Ra Tempel, Walter Wegmüller and unknowingly a major part of the Cosmic Jokers. The beauty of SCHULZE's works were that each forged its own way and crafted a distinct feel unlike any other artist or from his own previous albums. BLACKDANCE was also the first to be released in England on the Caroline, a Virgin label which opened his music to a much wider audience outside Germany.

The third album BLACKDANCE was released in 1974 but due to errors in the packaging about the date, the album was long thought to be the fourth album after the 1975 release "Picture Music" and has mistakenly been released as the fourth album in newer reissue series but it has nowadays been correctly been placed in its proper chronological order. The album featured new developments in SCHULZE's early sound that created a never-ending series of timbre gymnastics that ranged from relaxing to creepy and downright startling. While the debut "Irrlicht" featured an industrial coldness that was designed to alienate the listener and "Cyborg" followed in its footsteps, BLACKDANCE on the other hand took on a much more organic sound with not only non-synthesized instruments such as 12-string guitar and the bass vocals of Ernst Walter Siemon adding a more human touch. Congas and tabla also added more "authentic" percussive sounds.

The album was original released with only three lengthy tracks. "Ways Of Change" (17:50) and "Some Velvet Phasing" (8:30) composed the side A of the original vinyl album and the 22:30 "Voices of Syn" took up the entire B side. Subsequent CD remasters have included the unreleased tracks "Foreplay" and "Synthies Have (No) Balls?" which add an extra 24 minutes of creepy synth tones but are of a lesser quality for whatever reason. Progressive electronic music is actually quite difficult to gage and review as it's all so cerebral and the different approaches of the various albums will appeal to different music lovers for different reasons. While the first two albums were abstract and otherworldly, BLACKDANCE seems a lot more grounded. Perhaps due to the fact that SCHULZE switched to real synthesizer, real organs, piano and the extra touches of guitar and voice.

"Waves Of Changes" comes off exactly as the title portends, namely an oscillating series of synth sequences that slowly ratchet up the tension but then are caressed by the lushness of an acoustic guitar that strums on and on and on but after a few minutes the track becomes a percussive beast with tablas and congas breaking the synth swirls. The album immediately sets itself apart from the first two SCHULZE albums and this tracks is particularly energetic. SCHULZE has always stated that all musicians should learn how to play drums as it allows one to feel out the grooves and rhythms and this track with its percussive bombast alongside the rhythmic swirls and out buzzes makes it clear that progressive electronic music is indeed percussive. It's just that the percussion is usually implied rather than explicitly stated.

"Some Velvet Phasing" settles into a more familiar feel as a pure electronic synth sounds jet in and out of the audio zone as organs create creepy semi-musical scales that sort of create a hypnotic repetition and at a mere 8:30, the shortest track on the album. "Voices Of Syn" is my favorite track. It starts out with Ernst Walter Siemon singing operatic bass vocals in a liturgical chanting style while SCHULZE slowly ratchets up the oscillating waves of synth sounds that ultimately take over the dominate the pulsating soundscape that flows like a river into a sea of ambient foreverness. Siemon was an opera singer who was rehearsing at a studio in Berlin when Schulze was recording on Tangerine Dream's first album. The track carries the stream of consciousness with a constant drone leading the fluttering synth sounds that carry on for the side length run and slowly extinguish yet another lengthy album of cerebral contemplation and spaced out surreality.

BLACKDANCE is one of my favorite early KLAUS SCHULZE albums. Whereas many albums run a monotonous gamut no matter how interesting they may be, BLACKDANCE exhibits three distinct moods that find a much more varied wealth of tones, tempos, timbres and textures. The atmospheres are intense but the overall feel of the album is less intense due to the guitar, percussion and vocals on board. The organ droning adds the proper hypnotic surreality to the album while the other elements seemingly exist in a parallel universe and are merely bleeding over to this one. It's always interesting why certain albums by an artist catch on with the masses and others seem to go unnoticed. BLACKDANCE usually takes a backseat to the other albums that surround it but in my book, it's one of the most distinct and most interesting and the one i prefer to get lost in as opposed to the more popular "Mirage" or "X. As far as i'm concerned this one is absolutely brilliant and should rightfully be regarded as a classic.

 En=Trance by SCHULZE, KLAUS album cover Studio Album, 1988
3.34 | 59 ratings

BUY
En=Trance
Klaus Schulze Progressive Electronic

Review by patrickq
Prog Reviewer

2 stars En=Trance, originally released as a double-LP in 1988, is a perfect example of ‪Klaus Schulze‬ keeping up with the proverbial times. He used the latest equipment (e.g., Roland S-50 sampling keyboard and TR-505 drum machine, both from 1986) and the latest sounds, epitomized by the Yamaha DX7 mark II, released in 1987, which used FM synthesis, the then-hot technology.* At the time, the DX7 was pretty amazing, and although its sounds could be customized extensively, they were so awesome that many artists didn't see the point. I'm no expert, but it sounds like Schulze may not have approached digital FM synthesis as experimentally as he had undertaken analog synthesis, beginning with Blackdance in 1974 - - and certainly not as experimentally as he had approached modifying Teisco and Farfisa organs before that. For centuries, people have complained that new technologies make people lazy, and relatedly, that there's intrinsic value in hard work, even if it's totally unnecessary hard work. Writing with a fountain pen instead of using an inkwell, driving a motorcar instead of a horse-drawn carriage, using a calculator instead of doing math by hand - - each of these was seen as evidence of the demise of "grit" and of the fundamental laziness of humanity. The truth in this belief is that, thanks to the new technology, you needn't expend much effort to surpass the results of the old technology. What makes someone like Schulze interesting is that we can compare his output across four generations of synthesizer technology: pre-synth, analog (1974-1979), digital (c.1980s and 1990s), and virtual.

The middle two sides of En=Trance ("α-Numerique" and "FM Delight") are the least interesting to me, but not only because FM is among my least favorite types of synthesis. I think it's also because, despite their lengths (‪16:32‬ and ‪17:29‬ on the 2005 Revisited remaster), these tracks seem rushed in places; perhaps because of improvements in technology, Schulze had more time to develop more ideas, more of which he squeezed into vinyl side.** "α-Numerique" and "FM Delight" also suffer from overuse of lead parts, some too dramatic to my ears, and others too shrill.

As far as I know, En=Trance marked just the second album on which Schulze used a drum machine throughout. On eighteen of his prior albums, most rhythms were provided by a waveform, a (melodic) sequencer, or a drummer or percussionist. Here, as on Angst, it's all drum machines. That works well on side one ("En=Trance") and reasonably well on the final track, "Velvet System." But for most of Schulze's music, I prefer the feel of the percussionist following along with - - or keeping up with - - the synthesizer or sequencer.

The best track here is "En=Trance;" not surprisingly, it's the most reminiscent of Schulze's mid-1970s work, especially the movement beginning at 4:15. Over the next few minutes, though, a familiar pan-flute preset exerts itself, and "En=Trance," bless its heart, threatens to become a wholly redundant remake. Luckily, it never follows through on the threat. "Velvet System" is nearly as good; coming after "α-Numerique" and "FM Delight," it represents a return to the pensive sequence-based sound of "En=Trance," at least until 12:30, when an unnecessarily theatrical sequence takes over. "Elvish Sequencer," the relatively brief bonus track on the 2005 reissue, was recorded in 1975, but doesn't sound as out of place as you might think. It's nearly entirely sequence-based - - it's missing the lead synth part common to so many Schulze works. In a nice twist, it has two false endings; but as "Elvish Sequencer" is evidently incomplete, those endings come too soon.

To those FM synthesis fans (or DX7 aficionados) interested in late-1980s progressive-electronic art music, I'd recommend En=Trance, but to those interested in Schulze, I'd suggest trying any of his first ten LPs first.

====

*Another strikingly modern aspect of the record was its stark, high-contrast artwork.

**En-Trance was the second of Schulze's albums to be released simultaneously on CD, and his second "DDD" release.

 Cyborg by SCHULZE, KLAUS album cover Studio Album, 1973
3.70 | 172 ratings

BUY
Cyborg
Klaus Schulze Progressive Electronic

Review by friso
Prog Reviewer

4 stars I don't usually listen to electronic music, but these early works from the seventies with their eerie covers and titles somehow trigger memories of childlike fantasies and attraction. I already owned Tangerine Dream's 'Zeit' double lp and expected this to be in a similar vain, yet this record wildly exceeded my expectations!

Skimming through my colleague's reviews I frequently stumble upon descriptions as non-lineair, droning, non- melodic, modern, ambient and so forth. All these do apply in abundance, yet I was surprised how harmonic and musical this record actually was! To me these four side long pieces feel like quite natural one-man meditations on technology-driven modern classical music. Every piece could have lost 5-10 minutes without being comprised in impact. Then again, the record does offer time to fully embrace its soundscapes and trigger once's own projections on it. The opening track Synphära and closing track Neuronengesang offer most variety and engagement and are therefor arose as my favorites at first spin. Conphära is a strong experimental piece with a mind boggling main drone and melancholic strings (which start to distort slightly toward the middel of the vinyl). Chromengel is perhaps my least favorite and reminds me most of the bleak minimalism of 'Zeit'.

I can't imagine any-one really enjoying this on headphones of low-fi stereo equipment. This isn't really music, not in a traditional way. It's more like a abstract movie you have to watch with your eyes closed. Guided imagination. A soundtrack to trigger your own sci-fi fantasy. Klaus Schulze offers a complete work with a unique impact and therefor my rating of four stars is more then accounted for.

Thanks to ProgLucky for the artist addition. and to NotAProghead for the last updates

Copyright Prog Archives, All rights reserved. | Legal Notice | Privacy Policy | Advertise | RSS + syndications

Other sites in the MAC network: JazzMusicArchives.com — jazz music reviews and archives | MetalMusicArchives.com — metal music reviews and archives

Donate monthly and keep PA fast-loading and ad-free forever.