Progarchives, the progressive rock ultimate discography

SEQUENTIA LEGENDA

Progressive Electronic • France


From Progarchives.com, the ultimate progressive rock music website

Sequentia Legenda picture
Sequentia Legenda biography
Laurent Schieber - Born in 1965 (France)

It was in 1980 at the age of 15 that Laurent Schieber discovered a new music coming from elsewhere, a new tone: an unknown world was going to open to him and somewhat by accident.

Among all the 33-rpm vinyl collection of his parents, a particular album got his attention. The particular look of the cover intrigued him. A distinctive style, a refined cover, a face, a name: KLAUS SCHULZE.

At this time, he did not know yet that by taking out the LP off its sleeve and that by putting it delicately on the record player, that the listening of it was going to change his musical vision.

A few days later, he went to the nearby record shop to find KLAUS SCHULZE's other albums. Around him, he talked only about his musical discovery.

With a growing interest in synthesizers, he decided to take music lessons and it was at the back shop of a little music store in his town that the introduction to music theory and the initiation to keyboard took place. It was right here that the most emblematic of the synthesizers, the famous Minimoog, was located.

At the age of 17, shortly after discovering the music of KLAUS SCHULZE, he bought his first monophonic synthesizer and he started to create sounds. A little later he purchased some of the instruments KLAUS SCHULZE had too: the ARP Odyssey, the Korg PS3200, the Moog Polymoog and later, the Roland JD800.

Producing an album is a project that matured for more than 30 years. Laurent released a digital version of his first album 'Blue Dream' in late 2014 and in late September 2015 just released physical copies of the same effort. In 2015, he published one more track, 'Au Revoir', as a tribute to the late EDGAR FROESE. He keeps on releasing electronic progressive/ Berlin school music in the vein of KLAUS SCHULZE under the moniker SEQUENTIA LEGENDA.


Biography written by Sequentia Legenda and Lucas Biela

SEQUENTIA LEGENDA Videos (YouTube and more)


Showing only random 3 | Search and add more videos to SEQUENTIA LEGENDA

Buy SEQUENTIA LEGENDA Music



More places to buy SEQUENTIA LEGENDA music online Buy SEQUENTIA LEGENDA & Prog Rock Digital Music online:

SEQUENTIA LEGENDA discography


Ordered by release date | Showing ratings (top albums) | Help Progarchives.com to complete the discography and add albums

SEQUENTIA LEGENDA top albums (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

4.86 | 7 ratings
Blue Dream
2014
3.50 | 2 ratings
Amira
2015
5.00 | 1 ratings
Extended
2016
4.56 | 6 ratings
Ethereal
2017
4.86 | 3 ratings
Renaissance
2018

SEQUENTIA LEGENDA Live Albums (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

SEQUENTIA LEGENDA Videos (DVD, Blu-ray, VHS etc)

SEQUENTIA LEGENDA Boxset & Compilations (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

SEQUENTIA LEGENDA Official Singles, EPs, Fan Club & Promo (CD, EP/LP, MC, Digital Media Download)

0.00 | 0 ratings
Vibrations
2015
0.00 | 0 ratings
Au Revoir
2015

SEQUENTIA LEGENDA Reviews


Showing last 10 reviews only
 Renaissance by SEQUENTIA LEGENDA album cover Studio Album, 2018
4.86 | 3 ratings

BUY
Renaissance
Sequentia Legenda Progressive Electronic

Review by BrufordFreak
Collaborator Honorary Collaborator

5 stars More Berlin School magic from Klaus Schulze devot' Laurent Schieber, the Mulhouse Maestro seems to be pulling together an LP per year (or, more accurately, every nine months) all the while increasing in confidence, quality, and allure. While last year's Ethereal was a veritable prog masterpiece--and remains on my frequent rotation playlist-- I've been so busy this year (since May) that I've had little time to listen to much new music much less 20+ minute long epics like these. But, I can now say, these are every bit as much up to the standards set by Laurent's previous work--and by the master himself, M. Schulze.

1. "Out of the Silence" (21:55) starts surprisingly familiar and takes a little time growing and developing (a little too much time, in my humble opinion). A drummer's cymbol play enters and joins the sequence over the course of the fifth minute. It sounds live (not looped)! Full drums enter in the seventh minute, total key shift at 7:35 and then back to original formation at 8:25. Two more different key shifts in the tenth and eleventh minutes with a few more percussion noises added to the mix, but the song doesn't really go anywhere new, different, or exciting--not even the shift to a more minor key spectrum at the 11:00 mark--though it is nice that there are four key shifts to choose from instead of the usual two. At 14:00 all rhythm tracks are dropped and multiple layers of synth chords and synth noises hold their own in a new universe of spacey-ness. I like this section. Especially the hypnotic four-note electric piano arpeggio repeated as the central foundation. The brilliance of Rainer Br'ninghaus's work with Eberhard Weber comes to mind. A solid song with a wonderful final third--again, a song that is displaying the growth and development of Laurent's confidence and mastery. (8.5/10)

2. "Ici et Maintenant" (25:40) opening with a much darker, foreboding soundscape than is usual for Sequentia Legenda, the slow fade in of the rhythm and percussion tracks and multiple loops of synth washes brings with it a softening of the tension, a slight brightening of hope. By the fifth minute all levels seem set. By the ninth minute the repetition is starting to wear and then--boom!--at the 9:00 mark, just in perfect timing, there is a big shift--a key change which settles the nerves. Awesome! Laurent is getting so good at reading his listeners (or, at least, me). Something about this key makes the music so much more settling, more relaxing, then, at 11:00, the key shifts again--back to its original, but thanks to that two minute reprieve, it is much more tolerable, enjoyable. Another shift at 13:00--and with it some new synth and keyboard "harp" chords and flourishes. Nice! At 15:00 we enter yet another key. The sequenced items are feeling so friendly and close now. New percussives are being added-- prominent kick drum in the lower range and hi-hat cymbol in the high. After 17:00 a few more synth noises: insect buzzes, full synth wash chords, and an orchestra-like snare track. Nice. The soundscape is so perfectly balanced-- and not overly full. The subtle introduction of so many elements helps me, the listener, to stay entranced and entrenched . . . in the Here and Now. Tom-tom runs are added to the mix in the twentieth minute and then, quite suddenly, at the 20:00 mark, everything collapses; all tracks but the synth washes and a few two-note rhythm tracks disappear. This is awesome! I am so stupefied by the slowly panned and flanged single note "guitar pluck"--I'm reliving my deep connection to Propaganda's "Dream Within a Dream"--one of my all-time favorite songs. Love the prolonged exit with the percussives and upper octave electric piano arpeggi. Awesome song! Definitely a showcase piece of a Berlin School master! (10/10)

3. "Valentins Traum" (17:24) a long opening with minor or discordant chord choices over which odd and eerie, even disturbing, sounds flit in and out of the soundscape. The sequenced rhythm track stays far in the background, fading in and out of the aural spectrum. Only in the fifth minute does it begin to emerge and stay, even rise to a place within the thick of the sonic palette. By the end of the sixth minute an electronic harpsichord riff, insect zip!- buzz, electronic tambourine, and rotation of synth strings washes have established themselves as the mainstays. The chord selection is not quite as dark and scary now, though eerie, unnatural sounds continue to fly in and out of the soundscape. That "harp/harpsichord" riff is so hypnotizing! In the eleventh minute multiple components of a drum kit are introduced and interwoven. The eerie sounds become more frequent, constant, and layered in multiplicity as the drums and rhythm tracks fade out by the end of the fourteenth minute. The d'nouement is slow, gradual, and steady, so I'm guessing that Valentin's dream was a bit of a disturbing event, though not one that caused sudden fright or night terrors, but the persistence of the scary sounds continues in the fore despite the slow fade of the music into the background, so perhaps I a wrong. Nice work. Definitely engaging, mesmerizing, and convincing as a representation of its subject matter. (9/10)

Five stars; another masterpiece of Berlin School-inspired progressive electronic music from this evolving master-- and another superb masterpiece to contribute to the lexicon of Prog Electronic Epics and Prog Valhalla.

 Ethereal by SEQUENTIA LEGENDA album cover Studio Album, 2017
4.56 | 6 ratings

BUY
Ethereal
Sequentia Legenda Progressive Electronic

Review by BrufordFreak
Collaborator Honorary Collaborator

5 stars Laurent Schieber has done it again! Just when you think the Berlin School sound has been played out, Laurent releases something new that just keeps upping the ante! The second of these three epics of progressive electronic music may be my favorite Berlin School song ever made!

1. "Stratums of Seraphic Voices" (26:28) a variety of Moog Modular-sourced chords weave together for the first three minutes of this one. The plasticized percussive sounds MIDI-ed within the "drum" and rhythm sequence track (reminding me very much of the sounds produced from Blue Man Group music) that develop and establish themselves throughout the bulk of the song. (Love the tabla sound integrated in there, as well!) As a matter of fact, one might conclude that the percussives are the real lead track here with the synths playing second fiddle--though the song would be far from as effective without them and their steadfast swirling and spiraling. The addition of 80s sounding Western drum machine percussion sounds is well-integrated by this point. A key change at 17:38! What an unexpected surprise! And then back at 19:15. Back up again at 20:55. And another higher shift at 22:30. Bursts of Star Warsian space-spitting noises join in the soundscape during this last four minutes. A final downward key shift at 24:50 finds the music joined by Mellotron choir voices. Nice. (9/10)

2. "Around the Second Moon" (22:45) opens with some very interesting slowly sliding note "arpeggi" beneath which some sequential percussion/bass lines try to establish themselves. As the treble sounds thin and disappear, the "bubbling," "squirting" sequencer lines become more interesting, hypnotic, captivating, and then foundational, even melody holders. In the fourth minute, they are the only music placeholders before some synth washes sneak in from behind. The chord choices of the synths add so much to enhance the sequencing. It's not until the middle of the seventh minute that the first percussive sound arrives and begins to elbow its way into the mix. By now the bass and synth lines have wormed their way into your subconscious in a kind of Edgar Alan Poe way while syncopated, intermittent percussives make it sound like Madeline Usher trying to break out of her casket in the basement. This is SO COOOL!!! New upper octave sequence sneaks in during the twelfth minute before a wave of a cymbol crash signals the achievement of full sound. Simply brilliant! So cool that the free, or improvisational instrument is a kind of large, kodo-like drum--until the seventeenth minute when percussives fade out. By the beginning of the eighteenth minute, all of the original instrumental sounds and sequences have pretty much faded into the distant background save for the synth washes--which now seem augmented by Mellotron choir voices. Staticky-rainstick-fly noises pan quickly across the soundscape while all three of the dominant sequential tracks slowly reassert themselves, if still in the background. A little PETER GABRIEL Passion: Music for the Last Temptation of Christ soundtrack can be felt at the end. (10/10)

3. "Elevation" (20:36) very steady, even, and subtly uneventful over the first half, the second half sparks to life but then drags on without enough development, resolution, or dénouement. (8/10)

Were I more familiar with Klaus Schulze's work of the second half of the 1970s I might find more to compare and critique, but, as is, I can only find praise. The clarity and fullness of modern sound is so pleasant and fulfilling to the ear and soul than the often thin and scratchy stuff of recordings from the 70s that, as with the Master's 2007 release, Kontinuum, I am filled with only praise and joy.

Five stars; a minor masterpiece of progressive rock music and one of the 21st Century's shining examples of stellar Berlin School revitalization.

 Blue Dream by SEQUENTIA LEGENDA album cover Studio Album, 2014
4.86 | 7 ratings

BUY
Blue Dream
Sequentia Legenda Progressive Electronic

Review by BrufordFreak
Collaborator Honorary Collaborator

5 stars Frenchman Laurent Schieber has been a life-long fan of electronic music--especially the legendary synthesizer sequencing of the fictitious "Berlin School of Electronic Music" (there is not nor was there ever an actual school of electronic music in Berlin churning out the great artists or albums of the 1970s) and especially of the recently deceased Klaus Schulze. It seems that Laurent had been experimenting with his own imitations and compositions for years but is only now, in the last few years, publishing recordings of his compositions for public consumption--and I, for one, am so glad that he is. Blue Dream consists of three long songs: the 33-minute 10-part suite, "Fly Over Me" (10/10), the 22-minute "The Approach" (8/10) with its driving drum and synthesizer rhythm tracks and shifting synth washes beneath and within, and the 15-minute "bonus" song, "Vibrations" (9/10). All songs are very well mixed and produced (would that the Tangerine Dream and Klaus Schulze albums of the 1970s had this kind of sound quality) with my favorite being the opener--which is clearly the centerpiece of the album, with the bonus song, "Vibrations," next. While none of the compositions here reveal anything new or innovative in the world of electronic sound technology, the perfect imitation of the masters of the 1970s is a true homage and, I believe, fully Laurent's top intention.
 Blue Dream by SEQUENTIA LEGENDA album cover Studio Album, 2014
4.86 | 7 ratings

BUY
Blue Dream
Sequentia Legenda Progressive Electronic

Review by richardgurtler

5 stars Sequentia Legenda "Blue Dream" CDr

French sound sculptor Laurent Schieber, based in the suburbs of Mulhouse, is better known under his artistic name Sequentia Legenda, a project heavily dedicated to vintage Berlin School Music and inspired by the iconic Klaus Schulze. "Blue Dream" is Sequentia Legenda's debut album, which is out since the end of 2014 as a self-release packaged in catchy matte 6-panel digipak. Designed by Laurent Schieber himself and mastered by Olivier Briand.

The album is comprised of three longer compositions, among them the opening piece "Fly Over Me" is the longest one clocking over 33 minutes. Although not indexed, the track is divided in another 10 pieces, mostly rather shorter with the exception of the unfolding part, 10 and a half minutes "The First Contact" and "Overhead", which reaches 7 and a half minutes in length. "The First Contact" is invaded by gracefully floating washes, strongly cinematic with utterly sumptuous and amorphously enrapturing yearning feel, and meticulously counterpointed with sublimely permeating sequencer sparkles, mesmerizingly persistent. Shorter "Approach (intro)" will later appear in its 22-minute version as a second main composition. The sequencing pace is getting slightly faster and energetic, while celestial choirs insistently guard above. The texture seamlessly floats between shorter sub-pieces, where sequencer arrangements move from briskly glittering to more, relatively soothing, then again shifting into up-paced, warmly inviting elevations. After about 20 minutes and 6 sub-tracks we enter another longer part, already mentioned "Overhead", which keeps on the path of immensely heartwarming vistas bridged with abundantly luminous melodies. Flying on the wings of this spellbinding scenario we clandestinely approach the closing part "The Return" and wrap-up the first composition, "Fly Over Me". Distant seashore winds announce "The Approach". This time the journey continues without any sub-passages. Again slowly revealing with serene, yet monumental washes, while the multi-dimensional sequencers gently fire up its engines. Some really captivating transitions emerge along the way when shifting to the next gear, although rather subtly diverse. But still these soft metamorphoses are utterly transporting, ranging from electrifyingly dynamic to panoramically spectacular. Imposing!!! The closing 15-minute "Vibrations" slows down a bit, when the sequencing patterns twinkle in a really gorgeous symmetry with free-gliding washes. An infinite equilibrium of magnificence between splendidly spacious drifting nostalgia and fascinatingly pulsing subtleties, here and there reinforced by additional cyber-tech glimpses. A top-notch conclusion and a magnum opus to my ears as well!!!

70-minute "Blue Dream" is undoubtedly a really triumphant debut album by Sequentia Legenda, bravo, Laurent!!! I would say even sensational, but on the long run I would prefer more varied arrangements, maybe some extra slower, more enigmatic sinuousness or cybernetic-infused ventures would bring more brilliancy to this already ambitiously accomplished and significantly invigorating recording. And while remaining in artist's shoes, maybe with the next release I would take the route with less promotional hype printed on the digipak's artwork, because I think Sequentia Legenda's music is strong enough and it "speaks" for itself even without this extra campaign. Sometimes less is more. Leave this for flyers and press packages. If you are a connoisseur of Berlin School-driven electronica, this is an ultimate must-have album awaking all the high-spirited magic of this classic style. Sequentia Legenda has released in the meantime another album entitled "Amira", this one is out since the end of November 2015. And the third recording, tentatively named "Extended", is scheduled for the release around September 2016 as a double album featuring a guest participation by German drummer Tommy Betzler, who most recently worked with Michael Brückner on their "Two" collaboration. So don't let Sequentia Legenda to slip under your radar screen!!!

Richard Gürtler (Mar 25, 2016, Bratislava, Slovakia)

Thanks to lucas for the artist addition. and to Quinino for the last updates

Copyright Prog Archives, All rights reserved. | Legal Notice | Privacy Policy | Advertise | RSS + syndications

Other sites in the MAC network: JazzMusicArchives.com — jazz music reviews and archives | MetalMusicArchives.com — metal music reviews and archives