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JAZZCOMPUTER.ORG

Progressive Electronic • France


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Jazzcomputer.org biography
Jazzcomputer.org is an electronic ambient jazz project by multi-instrumentalist Yves Potin. While studying at Le CIM in Paris under Pierre Cullaz, Yves Potin become influenced by the music of Chick Corea Eleckric Band, Klaus Schulze, Yes, Pink Floyd, King Crimson, Weather Report, Herbie Hancock, and Frank Zappa, and also was momentarily part of Le CIM student?s salsa big band. With a strong interest in computer science, Yves Potin originally wrote his first electronic music using an Atari ST and a some synthesizers. Because of the power of modern computers and the ability to distribute music via internet rather than through record labels and physical distributing, Potin started writing and recording music that is now available for download on his homepage.

The music of Jazzcomputer.org is an even mixture of soaring ambient synthesizers, traditional Eastern instrumentation, and guitar and other instruments played in an improvisational jazz-style.

A real convincing blend of aerial synthesized sound textures and colourful jazzy-psychout arrangements.

Similar artists in the archives: Steve Roach, Robert Rich, Klaus Schulze, Ian Boddy, Cosmic Hoffmann

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JAZZCOMPUTER.ORG discography


Ordered by release date | Showing ratings (top albums) | Help Progarchives.com to complete the discography and add albums

JAZZCOMPUTER.ORG top albums (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

5.00 | 1 ratings
First album
2006
4.05 | 2 ratings
Elsewhere
2007
3.18 | 2 ratings
Light Of Lost Summers
2007
5.00 | 1 ratings
Ambient Jazz
2008
4.05 | 2 ratings
Life - Unfolding
2009
5.00 | 1 ratings
Out Of The City
2009
3.05 | 3 ratings
Places
2011
3.53 | 11 ratings
Many Sides Of Music - The Jazzy Way
2014
4.00 | 3 ratings
Many Sides Of Music - The Ambient Way
2014

JAZZCOMPUTER.ORG Live Albums (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

JAZZCOMPUTER.ORG Videos (DVD, Blu-ray, VHS etc)

JAZZCOMPUTER.ORG Boxset & Compilations (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

3.00 | 2 ratings
Best of
2011

JAZZCOMPUTER.ORG Official Singles, EPs, Fan Club & Promo (CD, EP/LP, MC, Digital Media Download)

JAZZCOMPUTER.ORG Reviews


Showing last 10 reviews only
 Light Of Lost Summers by JAZZCOMPUTER.ORG album cover Studio Album, 2007
3.18 | 2 ratings

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Light Of Lost Summers
Jazzcomputer.org Progressive Electronic

Review by admireArt

3 stars Smooth Jazz meets progressive/electronics.

Light of Lost Summers (2007), JAZZCOMPUTER a.k.a. Yves Potin's album has a fair share of very interesting musical proposals that tend to blend really modern electronics with a kind of sometimes imaginative "New Age Jazz", but then again sometimes with a quiet "cliched" version of modern "mainstream" Jazz..

Ironically, the best parts of the compositions are those which are closer to the prog/electronics of nowadays, the infamous "Ambient" tagging . Surrounding himself with many instruments from various parts of the world (Udu, Koto, Harp, Tablas, Timpani, Nagadas and guitars.), which he combines with "spacy" synths. So there are some heavy electronic thunderstorms alongside and simultaneously counterpointing some mellow or melodical Jazz structures.

As such it all sounds magnificent, but his Jazz songwriting does not fall that far from the kind of clean cut ,"mainstream style", aseptic, easy listening Jazz that was intended for less demanding audiences. (Not to sound disrespectful to George Benson or Wynton Marsalis or Chuch Mangione (ugh!!), but that type of "smooth" Jazz style.)

To sum it up, great electronic moments, composition wise and also more than once he gets the blending to sound daring, but on the other hand, the constant appearance of corny Jazzistic melodies or soloings spoils the whole fun.

***3.5 " Promising without doubt, but still on the making" PA stars.

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 Many Sides Of Music - The Ambient Way by JAZZCOMPUTER.ORG album cover Studio Album, 2014
4.00 | 3 ratings

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Many Sides Of Music - The Ambient Way
Jazzcomputer.org Progressive Electronic

Review by Aussie-Byrd-Brother
Special Collaborator Rock Progressivo Italiano Team

4 stars 2014 has seen the project Jazzcomputer.org, the musical alias for French multi- instrumentalist Yves Potin, release a two-set album collection called `Many Sides of Music', the first volume subtitled `The Jazzy Way' which focuses on shorter and more concise jazz influenced tracks, the second, and this release, `The Ambient Way', offering five long-form extended instrumental electronic pieces instead. It is in this style where Yves really gets to shine, applying a variety of different instrument solos over drifting and slowly evolving soundscapes and he has spent almost a decade in this style slowly honing his skills. Potin usually makes gentle ambient/electronic that is perfect for newcomers to the genre, with a constant warmth not often associated with the style. But this time around he's added a big dose of deep spacerock, with several sections actually comparable to the early Delirium Records era of Porcupine Tree, especially their albums from the period that covered `Up The Downstairs' through to their 40 min `Moonloop' EP. Perhaps the disc should have been titled `The Ambient Spaceway'?!

Album opener `The Gravity Well - part 2' (the first section appeared on the `Jazzy Way' volume) spends several minutes as a shimmering synth drone, no percussive elements at all, ghostly groaning leaving the listener lost in deep space. Subtle looped beats fade in, ethereal electric guitar rings through the blackness. Whispering voices just out of earshot, soothing electronic washes suddenly turning more urgent and tense pulsing dance beats softly kick at the listener. The eerie `Chew Z' moves into deep spacerock territory, a repetitive droning bass-line slinks under rippling synth effects and wild spontaneous electric guitar bursts to create a wildly disorientating and uneasy mood. There's a reflective Gong/eastern mysticism atmosphere to the drone piece `Gokna', gentle koto strums intersperse around rising/falling synth washes that makes for a captivating and spiritual contemplation.

`The Gravity Well' returns for a third segment, a hypnotizing collage of machine hum, alien chirping, mechanical pulses, unobtrusive beats pattering the backdrop and unravelling crystalline synths like waterdrops in a cave. I do find Yves' trademark fanciful synth runs are a little unnecessary here and distract a little from the darker moods the piece builds, but it does admittedly give it an almost cinematic flair. Album closer `Soavre' is one of the absolute highlights, subdued lonely and wounded guitar cries plead from the dark, seeking solace and rescue from the initially glacial keyboards that slowly turn delicate and shimmering, a coming solace from stresses and difficulties, slowly bringing change. Yves' electric guitar sounds so soulful here, and, as always, he takes a form of music that can easily be cold and heartless and makes it deeply human, compassionate and emotional.

`Many Sides of Music - The Ambient Way' is a fascinating release from Mr Potin, a lovely varied instrumental journey of both inner and outer space music. Frequently his albums stay firmly rooted in ancient world mystery, but this ones shows the artist taking flight and getting lost in the furthest reaches of space more than ever before. He finds a perfect balance for all these elements, and Spacerock lovers who don't mind a laid-back, slowly unfolding and ambient variation of the style should appreciate this. It hints at all sorts of directions the artist may like to head in the future, and as always for a Jazzcomputer.org release, it has a quiet contemplative spirit woven throughout the music, that I'm sure is very much a reflection of the artist himself.

Four stars.

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 Many Sides Of Music - The Jazzy Way by JAZZCOMPUTER.ORG album cover Studio Album, 2014
3.53 | 11 ratings

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Many Sides Of Music - The Jazzy Way
Jazzcomputer.org Progressive Electronic

Review by Aussie-Byrd-Brother
Special Collaborator Rock Progressivo Italiano Team

4 stars 2014 has seen a burst of inspiration from Yves Potin, a thoughtful and intelligent progressive artist who records under the pseudonym Jazzcomputer.org and releases ambient/electronic/world music that, while sedate and laid-back, never resorts to simple and bland New-Age clichés. His albums are always full of variety and colour, offering a distinctly proggy take on electronic/ambient music with frequent soloing on a wide range of instruments. The first of a two-album set, `Many Sides of Music - The Jazzy Way' unsurprisingly sees the artist giving more prominence to the jazz elements that have always drifted around his work, and this allows the composer to make his music a little more boisterous and up-tempo than before, while still retaining all the quiet and reflective atmospheres usually associated with it.

The perfectly titled `Warp' opens the disc, and the piece truly warps around a dizzying selection of aural colours. Gentle murmuring bass holds back behind raindrop-like pattering little beats, rambunctious acoustic guitar dripping over tense `On The Run'/Dark Side of the Moon chasing loops, and even a breakneck E.L.P-flavoured synth run in the middle! It's the sound of modern electronic coolness trying to find balance with the ancient mysterious world, with a shimmering dream-like quality throughout. Clipping beats skip over subtle synths and whimsical Moog runs on `No Joe', with wild electric guitars and heavy live drums bringing some fusion fire, quite a lustful tension to the piece. Rising and falling pulsing electronic oscillations in a Klaus Schulze-like manner over reggae flavours and tip-toeing electric piano with just a slight hint of unease in the final minute of `Sherkaner', while the infectious and up- tempo `Ivanova' has nimble delayed Steve Hillage-styled guitarwork over soft dancey programmed beats. Both of these pieces would possibly even make for a nice chilled-out track on any of the later Ozric Tentacles albums.

Despite a misleading darker opening, `The Gravity Well - Part 1' (the first of three parts, the remaining two to come on the companion album `The Ambient Way') gradually unwinds with soothing comfort, laid-back driving percussion and warm synth noodling that softly spirals away at every opportunity. `Terrace of Clouds' is the longest piece at over 8 minutes, light and dark dueling back and forth throughout. There's an almost hostile alien menace to the slowly uncurling shimmering synths, sustained strangled guitar slices that cut through and a suffocating murky bass bubbling under, but thankfully some dreamy and almost romantic reassuring diversions are offered and reprised throughout. A vibraphone-like synth setting even reminds of the later 70's Pierre Moerlin Gong period. The final two tracks bring quite a funkiness to the album, plenty of upbeat vibes and cruising relaxation to wind down on. `Three to Beam Up' has slinky fusion guitar chiming, punchy bass and bombastic symphonic synth bursts, while up-tempo closer `Transponder 1037' is positive and full of life, hypnotic electronic loops and joyful synth soloing, but it's a shame about the sudden abrupt ending!

`Many Sides of Music: The Jazzy Way is a lighter take on ambient/electronic that may be perfect for newcomers to the genre, who will find the variety and sense of movement the perfect way to ease into the style. With mostly shorter concise pieces, frequent soloing and instrument variety, it doesn't have that potentially uneventful subtlety that more difficult and seasoned electronic works have, exactly why I feel it would be a great introduction. For those familiar with the artist, it's a welcome and refreshing side to Yves, and fans of the mellow side of ambient/electronic/space music by artists like Andreas Vollenweider and the Ozrics will really enjoy this pleasing 50 minute set. I feel everyone should take a break from more heavy-going progressive music and unwind to something a little more relaxed once in a while, and this makes for a lovely undemanding listen. Those who prefer longer, thought-provoking compositions should perhaps first look towards `The Ambient Way' companion disc first, however. But they both only cost a few dollars, so why not take a chance?

Three and a half stars, rounded up to four.

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 Elsewhere by JAZZCOMPUTER.ORG album cover Studio Album, 2007
4.05 | 2 ratings

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Elsewhere
Jazzcomputer.org Progressive Electronic

Review by Aussie-Byrd-Brother
Special Collaborator Rock Progressivo Italiano Team

4 stars Jazzcomputer.org is the alias name for electronic ambient artist Yves Potin, and his 2007 release `Elsewhere' could not be more appropriately titled. Listening to this beautiful floating and energetic album transports you to another time and place altogether, taking you away from all your stresses and worries. It's a hypnotic and blissful trip through progressive music, New-Age soundscapes, gentle jazzy diversions and ambient atmospheres. There are frequent world music elements and ethnic instruments that enhance the experience and give the album a greater variety without sounding messy or fragmented. The three long pieces that comprise the album run through a variety of tempos, styles and emotions to provide a richly rewarding and exciting work.

The nearly ten minute `Indian Mood on Thethys' begins the album with delicate electric guitar picking and Koto strums over the top of the most gentle of synth washes. Just a hint of mystery and fascination to this introduction, and like a cool wind it blows softly around the listener. Soon the guitar playing jolts in and out of slightly uneasy King Crimson-like urgent snaps and darker keyboard tones. Ethnic percussion enters, chimes dazzle and gulping udu (essentially acting as the bass) murmurs along in the background before a disorientating fade out.

`Dawn In The Snow' is the piece that most reflects the album cover to me, even the title of the 12 minute piece suggests both the opposing sensations of `warm' and `cold'. Fading in with chilly electronic droning with pulsing effects and distant tension that draws ever closer and louder in volume, it envelopes the listener in ice and brings a sense of loneliness and isolation. Ominous and sad synth tones float in and out, yet like the beginning of a sunrise in the morning, warm keys start to gently rise and melt away the solitude to offer a sense of hope. A programmed drum loop, electronic humming bass and a wavering jazzy synth solo brings a feeling of wonder and renewed energy. Gamelan cymbals mark the end of the day, as soon the night is back upon us, but perhaps we're in a better place than we were at the beginning. We've brought a sense of hopefulness and positivity from the day to carry with us into the great unknown.

Like all good electronic-related works, a long extended piece (or a side long piece for those with a nostalgic affection for vinyl like me!) such as the 25 minute title track here is a grand statement of intent. Some sections of this piece even resembles elements of the Berlin School electronic artists, while Potin's eclectic variety of instruments and blending of genres brings his own unique identity. Beginning as a long glacial drone, cold keys and shimmering effects rise and fall, until a warmer and comforting synth melody gracefully washes forward, pushing in and out against the listener. Soon more of that Crimson styled manic guitar playing and frantic Gamelan gongs dance over the top of those humming electronic waves. The piece seamlessly morphs into a wild frenzy of programmed and live drums, harsh electronics and murky tension. A dirty and distorted electric guitar solo weaves through the chaos, carrying us through the danger, and before you know it we've arrived at a very Tangerine Dream-like soundscape with pulsing trance beats and swirling urgent keyboards. There's lots of energy here, perfectly advancing the track from the old world ethnic setting to a modern and sleek future, before falling away into a soothing and dreamy finale. So many ideas and genres blur effortlessly together on this piece!

Special mention must go to the tastefully simple and evocative cover artwork. I love the icy landscape, with the African Udu, like an undiscovered jewel, waiting in the middle to bring a sense of spiritual release and warmth to the barren world.

Although I've come to enjoy many of his albums, `Elsewhere' in particular has been been like a close friend over the last few months, providing me with an escape from the difficult place I currently find myself in. The constant sensations of an exciting future and confronting present make for an emotionally-charged and richly rewarding album to me, and it's one of many superb albums that make Yves Potin a very unique and special electronic related artist to me.

Four stars.

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 Best of by JAZZCOMPUTER.ORG album cover Boxset/Compilation, 2011
3.00 | 2 ratings

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Best of
Jazzcomputer.org Progressive Electronic

Review by Windhawk
Special Collaborator Honorary Collaborator

3 stars JAZZCOMPUTER.ORG is the artist moniker used by French composer and multi-instrumentalist Yves Potin. Since 2006 he has issued a steady stream of full length records where his aim is to produce material incorporating details from progressive rock and jazz with the floating dynamics of ambient instrumental music. "The Best of" compilation is his own selected favorites from earlier releases.

Ambient music appears to be the main focus of Yves Potin's creations while using the Jazzcomputer.org moniker, and he is good at assembling textures and motifs into pleasant instrumental excursions of a dark, dream-laden variety, occasionally flavored with Asian inspired or jazz oriented themes, but always with a firm foundation in musical journeys of a more tranquil nature. I'd suspect that those who enjoy artists like Vangelis and Kitaro would be a key audience for this production, and possibly with fans of the former more so than followers of the latter.

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 Places by JAZZCOMPUTER.ORG album cover Studio Album, 2011
3.05 | 3 ratings

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Places
Jazzcomputer.org Progressive Electronic

Review by Windhawk
Special Collaborator Honorary Collaborator

3 stars JAZZCOMPUTER.ORG is the artist moniker used by French composer and multi-instrumentalist Yves Potin. Since 2006 he has issued a steady stream of full length records where his aim is to produce material incorporating details from progressive rock and jazz with the floating dynamics of ambient instrumental music. "Places" from 2011 is his most recent studio outing.

With "Places", composer and multi-instrumentalist Yves Potin has crafted a pleasant and detailed ambient electronic album. At his best when incorporating multiple textures and motifs, and in particular when he does live up to his artist moniker Jazzcomputer, but by and large, this is a CD that will have its main audience amongst those who enjoy smooth, electronic ambient material, in particular if they don't mind the occasional jazz-tinged detail added to the proceedings.

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 Places by JAZZCOMPUTER.ORG album cover Studio Album, 2011
3.05 | 3 ratings

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Places
Jazzcomputer.org Progressive Electronic

Review by Conor Fynes
Prog Reviewer

3 stars 'Places' - Jazzcomputer.org (5/10)

Jazzcomputer.org is a French underground ambient project, and one I have not yet heard prior to today. Driven by musical electrician Yves Potin, the project passes itself off as 'ambient jazz electronic' music, although as far as his latest album 'Places' is concerned, one of those labels is missing from the music itself. Althoguh dense and relatively complex in its orchestration, Jazzcomputer.org's 'Places' takes the listener on a relaxing journey through a mellow use of electronic sounds. There is nothing here that particularly excites me, but the album is quite good at what it sets out to do.

Yves Potin's music is ambient in every sense of the word. A listener is more likely to get lost in the music, rather than feel a lasting impression from the music. The truth is, the music here is far too slippery to remember, even after a few listens. Unless a listener is making a real effort to memorize different tonal ideas that Potin crafts here, one might be hard pressed to remember the music of the album, save for a few descriptive words; 'relaxing', 'atmospheric', 'spacey'. The truth is, the music works well this way; by giving a sort of no- commitments experience for the listener, it becomes that much easier to enjoy the sounds for what they are; pleasant textures to the ear. Really, it is hard to go wrong with a formula like that, but as 'Places' indicates, it can be difficult to really excel. The sounds here are sometimes reminiscent of the ambient music Klaus Schulze composes, although Potin is clever to adopt some live instruments into his sound, such as the electric guitar and koto. Like everything else here, even these live instruments wash into the sound; there is a sense of composition here, but that is more to do with the structure of the pieces- which sometimes gradually build to adopt new sounds- rather than the ideas themselves.

Jazzcomputer.org is pleasant music, but as has been stated, there is little here to keep a listener coming back for third or fourth servings. 'Places' is the sort of album that would be perfect to listen to while meditating, or going through stress counseling. Yves Potin is excellent at crafting many sounds together to still sound smooth to the ear, and while 'Places' has not been an entirely convincing listen, I will be sure to see what other music the man has engineered.

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 Best of by JAZZCOMPUTER.ORG album cover Boxset/Compilation, 2011
3.00 | 2 ratings

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Best of
Jazzcomputer.org Progressive Electronic

Review by toroddfuglesteg

3 stars I gather that by reviewing this album, I have now reviewed albums in all the twenty-two ProgArchives sub categories. Not that it is a goal in itself. It just proves how diverse music ProgArchives exposes me and the rest of you to. So please go on an mind expansion through ProgArchives. So here I come, Progressive Electronic.

In this case, the album is also free and an easy download from Jazzcomputer.org's homepage. A well worth download.

Chit chat/small talk over. Here comes the mind expansive difficult bit. Jazzcomputer.org music is no easy listening and pretty difficult to describe in words. At least for a first timer in this genre like myself.

So........ No more excuses then...... Jazzcomputer.org has released this as best-off compilation of various tracks. All Jazzcomputer.org has their own identity so this can only be a small taster. None of these songs are hit material by any stretch of imagination. Not even by a wild imagination too....

Jazzcomputer.org's music is based on electronic, but with added guitars as the organic bit. So purely electronic as by use of computers only, it ain't. The guitars is more jazzy than shredding and power chords. There is no shredding and power chords here. Just gentle finger picking. In the back and foreground, you find the mood and atmospheric creating electronics. Synths in other words.

All this creates a very good blend. Style wise....... well, I have to plead ignorance and refer to the interview with Yves Potin. In short, I have never ever heard music like this in my life before.

Quality wise and which decide if you should use 10-15 minutes of your time downloading and then listen to this album, I find this music worth the effort. It is a compilation though and I will put the individual albums on my playlist sometimes soon. But I find what Yves Potin/Jazzcomputer.org is doing intriguing and well worth exploring. I am a bit hooked on Jazzcomputer.org, I have to admit. More hooked than I thought I would be.

This is an album worth exploring and I give it three stars + I will move onto the other albums.

3 stars

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 Life - Unfolding by JAZZCOMPUTER.ORG album cover Studio Album, 2009
4.05 | 2 ratings

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Life - Unfolding
Jazzcomputer.org Progressive Electronic

Review by philippe
Special Collaborator Content Development & Krautrock Team

4 stars Among the last efforts released by the guitarist and sound researcher Yves Potin, Life-unfolding provides an harmonious and deeply subaquatic-organic soundscaping trip. This collection of extended epics is mainly based on sustained synthesized waves, subtle-crystalline like guitar echoes / almost shredding like guitar solos with a delicate jazzy-esque flavour. The result is in the vein of previous efforts by Jazzcomputer.org but reveals new variations and an astonishing-sensual combination of elements, motives, sounds and textures. The musical orchestration seems to flow into deep spaces, dissolving material rules to reach the listener into an unique mind travel, full of reveries and mystical projections. The opening theme embraces a warm spaced out ambience, featuring ethereal synth chords and detached guitar melodies. The album carries on with serene, fragile and charming cosmic atmospheres, multidirectional experiments and majestic guitar melodies which progressively rise from the distance. Life-Unfolding closes the album with a lysergic-entrancing ambient spherical piece. For the spirit and the intimate direction, Life-Unfolding can easily ravish fans of early spacious ambient music by Steve Roach, Robert Rich, Mathias Grassow and a few others. Well recommended.

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Thanks to philippe for the artist addition.

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