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COSMIC GROUND

Progressive Electronic • Germany


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Cosmic Ground biography
From Aachen, Germany since 2014

Solo project of Dirk Jan Müller (keyboard player of the neo-krautrock band Electric Orange). The musical identity admits a brilliant and radical medley of darkened primeval droning sonorities, driven hypno-electronic moves for an eloquent travel into the center of the mind. Mindsplitting and definitely recommended to lovers of the most innovative and inspired facets of Kosmische Musik's early standards.

Similar Artists: Tangerine Dream, Michael Hoenig, Wolfgang Bock, Zombi, Günter Schickert, Coma Virus (...)

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COSMIC GROUND discography


Ordered by release date | Showing ratings (top albums) | Help Progarchives.com to complete the discography and add albums

COSMIC GROUND top albums (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

3.38 | 24 ratings
Cosmic Ground
2014
3.97 | 13 ratings
Cosmic Ground 2
2015
3.89 | 10 ratings
Cosmic Ground III
2016
3.89 | 9 ratings
Cosmic Ground IV
2018

COSMIC GROUND Live Albums (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

4.00 | 5 ratings
Cosmic Ground Live
2017

COSMIC GROUND Videos (DVD, Blu-ray, VHS etc)

COSMIC GROUND Boxset & Compilations (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

COSMIC GROUND Official Singles, EPs, Fan Club & Promo (CD, EP/LP, MC, Digital Media Download)

4.50 | 2 ratings
Deadlock
2015
4.33 | 3 ratings
The Watcher
2016

COSMIC GROUND Reviews


Showing last 10 reviews only
 Cosmic Ground IV by COSMIC GROUND album cover Studio Album, 2018
3.89 | 9 ratings

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Cosmic Ground IV
Cosmic Ground Progressive Electronic

Review by BrufordFreak
Collaborator Honorary Collaborator

4 stars The latest Berlin-School-styled space music from Electric Orange's keyboard maestro, Dirk Jan Müller--this time with more "shorter" songs and only one long epic.

1. "Possessed" (7:38) like a soundtrack to a creepy movie scene around railroad station, tracks, and sounds. The first of Dirk's interesting sound studies--this one an industrial mélange. The entrance and stay of a horn-like organ in for the final two and a half minutes is a bit incongruous. (8/10)

2. "Stained" (11:30) a slow sequence with octave-spanning bass-line establishes itself from the opening and proceeds to slowly rise and morph over the first four minutes. At 4:30 the sequences shifts into a higher octave while the rhythm and bass line remain constant. In the seventh minute, new sounds and tension dynamics enter making this more interesting. Very Tangerine Dream-like! The more sustained notes of the arpeggiated chords in the thick of the ninth minute are very cool, but then everything quiets down as Dirk begins the process of unravelling his Berlin School weave. (8.75/10)

3. "Obscured" (7:25) pure TANGERINE DREAM! Even sounds like part of its tracks come from a 1970s TD classic (while the rolling bass line sounds like bass and rhythm guitar tracks on PINK FLOYD's "Run Like Hell" from The Wall). (8.5/10)

4. "Greasy" (12:29) opens with spacey strings synth and deep bass note to match--almost church organ-like-- changing chords every 20 seconds or so. In the fourth minute the "space organ" disappears and a cool percussive computer synth sequence establishes itself--seeming to continually "rise" for over a minute before slowly reversing, seeming to "decompose." By the end of the eighth minute we are left with just the quiet bones of the sequence. (8.5/10)

5. "Progeny" (20:21) nicely echoed and flanged groovin' sequence over and under which synth and organ washes rise and fall. Very smooth, calming, and hypnotic. (9/10)

6. "Plains" (9:02) opens with on long-held full board synth chord that slowly builds as internal components seem to rise and fall. (Or do they?) This single chord is sustained for over three minutes while very subtle elements get slight rises or falls (e.g., a single pounding piano chord in the background). When singular elements "disappear" it is amazing to suddenly hear a component that you had not picked up before. This is like an aural test! Name those sounds, instruments, and chords contribution to this melange. Fascinating! I find myself liking this super simple song/étude more and more the longer it plays. (9.5/10)

7. "Deep End" (9:57) distorted and misshapen echoes of percussive sounds. Again, a fascinating study in sound manipulations. (8.25/10)

Let's face it, folks: Herr Müller is a master at this stuff. If you're looking for a collection of masterful, pleasing Berlin School songs with excellent sound mastering and really interesting experimentations with sound, you need look no further than this album.

Four stars; a very nice addition to prog world--especially interesting for fans of Berlin School music and especially the experimentations of Tangerine Dream.

 Cosmic Ground IV by COSMIC GROUND album cover Studio Album, 2018
3.89 | 9 ratings

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Cosmic Ground IV
Cosmic Ground Progressive Electronic

Review by Aussie-Byrd-Brother
Special Collaborator Rock Progressivo Italiano Team

4 stars With three studio discs, remix/previously digital only/unreleased pieces compilations and even a live album all popping up in a relatively short span of years, keyboardist Dirk Jan Müller of modern krautrockers Electric Orange keeps up the momentum of his solo career and its alias Cosmic Ground to deliver 2018's `IV'. With his army of analogue gear and creaky Mellotron once again in tow, while Dirk may still have one foot in the door of the defining vintage electronic masters of old, here he expands his Berlin School-modelled atmospheres in all sorts of further directions, infusing them this time with murkier Krautrock textures, cinematic soundtrack-like elegance, dark ambient drifts, gloomy drones, dreamy chill-outs and even sparingly implemented vocoder touches, making for the most varied and unpredictable Cosmic Ground work to date.

The pulsing hisses and stark droning machine-driven suffocation of opener `Possessed' is not `industrial' as such, but it's absolutely oppressive and monolithic in its level of intimidation and Cluster-like enveloping fear. The expertly unfurling Berlin-School drama of `Stained' fuses alien tribal percussion with a sequencer-pattered slink, the bouncing `Obscured's evocative vocoder recitations call to mind Robert Schroeder and plenty of vintage electronic artists (not to mention Pink Floyd, with the piece sounding like the love-child of `One of These Days' and `Sheep'!), and `Greasy' dances with unceasing Ashra/Manuel Göttsching-like ringing trickles that lift into chiming fluffy heavens.

The twenty-minute `Progeny is a multi-part suite that seamlessly moves through strident unfolding synth drones, ever-circling sequencer jangles and drifting come-downs, all rising and retreating with carefully controlled grace and an impeccable unhurried touch. Both `Plains' and `Deep End' are final hypnotic drones, the first ebbing and eerie, the latter adding a bubbling and hazy `Phaedra'-era Tangerine Dream fuzziness and seeping unease.

(And if a seventy-eight minute album isn't enough for you, download copies come with an additional thirty-eight minute piece `Soil', a longform drone of reverberating organ and drowsy ethereal guitar wisps, with the final minutes revealing a cavernous stalking pounding before succumbing to a calming Mellotron climax. It's a beautiful standalone work all its own, and hopefully it doesn't languish as a mere download only and receives its own CD or LP release in the future - hint, hint, Dirk?!).

Dirk Jan Müller keeps refining his approach and implementing new sounds with each successive Cosmic Ground release, and this latest one shows his greatest restraint and natural subtlety more effectively than ever, with long stretches of measured space-music that never become static or uneventful. `IV' can easily sit alongside Thorsten Quaeschning's `Cargo' soundtrack and Steve Roach's `Molecules of Motion' as one of the standout prog-electronic works of the year, and is Müller's defining solo work to date...likely only until his next one comes along and tops it!

Four and a half stars.

 Cosmic Ground Live by COSMIC GROUND album cover Live, 2017
4.00 | 5 ratings

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Cosmic Ground Live
Cosmic Ground Progressive Electronic

Review by Rivertree
Special Collaborator PSIKE Team & Band Submissions

4 stars COSMIC GROUND marks a progressive electronic studio and solo project actually. And so for one or two it may be a big surprise to notice, that on both occasions, from where this live recordings are taken, Dirk Jan Müller moreover will be accompanied by Horst Porkert on synths, who is also known for driving the German Sunhair label. Everything sounds harmonic, so much for the start. You should notice, I never had a considerable relation to pure electronic live concerts. There is a die hard fan base given of course, regarding The Netherlands too. So they once participated at E-Live Festival in Oirschot, a venue with reputation. At least the first song can be clearly associated to this gig.

Five improvisations are available in total, where Anomaly seems to be a bonus, solely when it comes to the digital download option. The rest is ideally designed for a double vinyl release. Adansonia Records have taken this task again. Dark Enck and Unground I (hey, ridiculous, I'm always reading 'Underground') are similiar in execution. The very start goes to the melancholic mellotron. Though this is sooner or later evolving into an extended partition of somewhat rhythmic sequencer loops. A very hypnotic affair in both cases. Sounding like accompanied by tribal percussion Cairo Grind in principle continues on this path.

With Unground II it's all changing to a more key driven sound. It feels like I'm underway in deeper and darker realms now, like undertaking a deep-sea expedition and being faced with odd creatures hereby. You may really sense the water pressure in some way. Man! What an atmosphere! Have you ever been to an oceanographic museum? Perfectly matching background music, especially when arriving at the darkest and deepest ground. This album mirrors a well made, mostly relaxed and laid back performance, spiked with common references to Klaus Schulze respectively Tangerine Dream. Not an everyday case of course ... when you're in the mood to release yourself for some time, and this ideally supported by headphones, a wonderful experience is guaranteed. As Dirk turns out to be a master of building suspense levels.

 Cosmic Ground Live by COSMIC GROUND album cover Live, 2017
4.00 | 5 ratings

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Cosmic Ground Live
Cosmic Ground Progressive Electronic

Review by Aussie-Byrd-Brother
Special Collaborator Rock Progressivo Italiano Team

4 stars Recorded over two dates in October and November 2016 and taken from performances in both Cairo and the Netherlands, `Live' sees Electric Orange keyboardist Dirk Jan Müller presenting a series of immersive Berlin School-modelled prog-electronic instrumentals in a concert setting, joined on additional synths by Horst Porkert of Sunhair Records. Like the last two Cosmic Ground studio albums, `Live' is comprised of four side-long pieces that slowly unfold and delicately reveal their intricacies, and while the early Seventies works of Tangerine Dream are the starting point as always, Dirk and company move beyond that as lengthy unhurried atmospheres and welcome surprises emerge throughout the set and take the pieces in fresh directions, with many stretches fusing both modern and vintage sounds effortlessly.

Opening with quietly mournful and groaning Mellotron mystery, `Dark Enck' evolves into a heavy and dense pure Berlin School drift that rumbles with jangling machine-driven tension and echoing cavernous vibrations. `Cairo Grind' quickly builds in tempo to thrum with rapid skittering sequencer trickles and pattering beats that almost take on a relentless trance-like urgency.

At its core, `Unground I' is a slowly unfolding drone with a constant sustaining hum to its backing behind placid synth caresses, but there's emerging traces of unease flitting around throughout, and it ultimately dissolves into more dangerous sequencer-laced tension in the second half. `Unground II' comes the closest to a purely ambient piece with serene lulling synth washes and fuzzy unfurling electronic trickles teeming with life, and it makes for a more soothing, hypnotic and embracing finale.

`Live' maintains the same high standard of the three (to date) Cosmic Ground studio albums, and it captures beautifully the energy and momentum that the live environment offers. Some may find nothing particularly new here, but take the time to look past the surface similarities to Tangerine Dream, give it plenty of repeated plays and dig a little deeper, and you'll discover a hugely rewarding live document from an intelligent modern progressive-electronic artist in Müller.

Four stars.

 Cosmic Ground III by COSMIC GROUND album cover Studio Album, 2016
3.89 | 10 ratings

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Cosmic Ground III
Cosmic Ground Progressive Electronic

Review by Aussie-Byrd-Brother
Special Collaborator Rock Progressivo Italiano Team

4 stars Cosmic Ground is the alias employed by keyboard player Dirk Jan Müller of modern German Krautrockers Electric Orange, a solo project in the progressive-electronic/kozmiche musik style completely composed on the same analogue equipment of the original era. While the vintage Berlin School influences are still present as on the previous two Cosmic Ground releases, Dirk has given his lengthy compositions here a broader approach that allows them more space to breathe and to carefully unfold, making `III' his most natural and subtle artistic expression with this project yet.

Again made up of four vinyl length side-long pieces, opener `Ground Control' might be comprised of slow to reveal longer ambient streams and briefly rising electronic washes, but a constant variety of frequently up-tempo dramatic sequencer trickles quickly gain unceasing momentum throughout with an ever-expanding serene Mellotron pool slowly seeping out. `Crumbling Darkness' is an elegant cinematic drone that holds a tender mystery, with gentle sweeping winds behind ambient landscapes of electric piano ripples, shimmering electronic levitations and hypnotic looping steady sequencer beats that hover in the air.

A ticking bounce quickly overwhelms the monolithic metallic hum of `Keep Us in Space' with an unflinching trance-like rhythm, and `Monochrome Ritual' is a groaning drone expanse, initially not unlike the self-titled opening track off Tangerine Dream's `Green Desert'. It morphs into an ethereal glistening caress lapping around the most submerged rumbling traces of sequencers trying to take flight before a final crystalline deep-space mediation.

Unhurried yet also seductively busy with the most minute of variations and intricate details that assure the airy flowing atmospheres never vanish into still nothingness, `III' is intelligent and restrained with a frequent aching beauty, and is easily the strongest effort from Mr Müller under the Cosmic Ground moniker to date.

Four stars (and Dirk, how about some live recordings soon?!)

 Cosmic Ground III by COSMIC GROUND album cover Studio Album, 2016
3.89 | 10 ratings

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Cosmic Ground III
Cosmic Ground Progressive Electronic

Review by Rivertree
Special Collaborator PSIKE Team & Band Submissions

4 stars Dirk Jan Müller is back from his third side trip to the Cosmic Ground by now, and he brings along some new goodies within the baggage. Technically seen this implies four extended elaborations, equipped with a proper Tangerine Dream retro reference again, just for a rough orientation, but definitely not reduced to that. Prepared as a double vinyl album offer this is dedicated to relax and to release basically. It's really amazing to experience how Dirk is able to materialize the imagination of gliding across the cosmos, with having a break here and there, at least for three times.

70 minutes, 70 days, 70 years? ... distance and time do not play a significant role anymore, are rather meaningless, when accompanying him on his recorded trips. And that's for sure, one will not suffer from boredom due to enough variation. There's a carefully pulsating flow given, respresented by the initial track Ground Control for example. And many many thanks for that wonderfully melancholic entree into Crumbling Darkness! Later on he's adding some hypnotic beat tendency, leaning towards rhythmic motion. Some impressions where you can divine his relation to Electric Orange in my opinion.

'Cosmic Ground III' is a new delicacy for designated progressive electronics fans by all means. However, I' don't have the ability to say if this is better than his prior albums or not, actually. Well, it doesn't matter in the end. Although Dirk is acting with a frequency of one album per year, which is rather ambitious when also taking his other projects into account, this is really well made, not something self-regarding at all. Recommended!

 Cosmic Ground III by COSMIC GROUND album cover Studio Album, 2016
3.89 | 10 ratings

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Cosmic Ground III
Cosmic Ground Progressive Electronic

Review by Einwahn

4 stars 'Cosmic Ground III' already... how time flies. Mind you, Tangerine Dream believed that Zeit was motionless and only existed in our own minds. If that sounds implausible, try listening to this album in a dark room.

I found Bandcamp's email alert about this album just after listening to Airbag's first album, 'Identity' and it set me thinking about 'mimic' bands. For those who don't know, Cosmic Ground is to Tangerine Dream what Airbag is to Pink Floyd. On the one hand, it is easy to disparage mimic bands, but on the other (and this is how I feel) they provide refreshing exposure to sounds we love from the Old Masters. And both Airbag and Cosmic Ground have taught me the same thing - the depth of invention of the Old Masters in elaborating their compositions. Because this extra dimension is absent in the Airbag/Cosmic Ground compositions - both bands recreate the Old Masters' sounds continuously but develop them less. I don't know if that makes sense or if I have been listening to 'CG III' too long now.

To get to my assessment, 'CG III' is another very definite four-star album in this series. Because of the lesser symphonic overlay compared to Tangerine Dream (see above), all Cosmic Ground tracks are even more hypnotic - and actually sustain their mystery in repeated plays because of the relative lack of landmark episodes. And the recreation of the phonic infrastructure is very, very impressive.

Verdict: If you liked the first two albums, you will like this one - without feeling it repeats material.

 Cosmic Ground 2 by COSMIC GROUND album cover Studio Album, 2015
3.97 | 13 ratings

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Cosmic Ground 2
Cosmic Ground Progressive Electronic

Review by Aussie-Byrd-Brother
Special Collaborator Rock Progressivo Italiano Team

4 stars Cosmic Ground is the name of the solo project from Electric Orange's keyboard player Dirk Jan Müller, who performs vintage era influenced deep-space soundscapes with elements of Kosmische Music, Berlin School, electronica, drone, trance and ambient styles. Dismissed by some as mere homage, or worse, an outright clone of the classic Seventies period of Tangerine Dream, Müller may absolutely utilise the same sounds as that defining group on the surface, but digger deeper reveals directions that the important German band never travelled in, as well as some very modern influences worked in as well.

While 2015's `Cosmic Ground 2' (arriving a year after the self-titled debut) takes the format of Tangerine Dream's `Zeit' by offering four vinyl-side length/twenty minute-plus extended pieces, it differs quite substantially musically from that particular genre-creating landmark work. It lacks the icy nightmarish drones of that double set, instead all of the four compositions here are made up of long stretches of minimalistic soundscapes that slowly evolve in the most subtle of ways, the most minute of details delicately worked in and stretched out much further than mere imitation would offer.

Opener `Sol' is sprinkled with chiming sequencer ripples that slowly grow in presence, the very lightest of dancing trance traces slinking in and out with fuzzy panning ambience its destination. The instantly darker `Ngc 224' groans with unease and builds in dense throbbing intimidation, and `Organia' drifts on gentler ambient washes, lulling synth caresses lapping back and forth as a steady pulsing beat bounces away before finally melting into darker ominous drifts. But the equally mysterious and lulling album closer `Altair' is the most impressive moment, Ashra and early Pink Floyd-like quivering organ shimmers and slowly emerging sequencer trickles concocting a drowsy, meditative and finally haunting siren cry of aching lonely beauty (although there was probably no need for the last minute sequencer dance, the piece was perfect just as it was!).

Dirk Jan Müller may not quite take the progressive-electronic/Kosmische Music style in undiscovered directions here, but nor is `Cosmic Ground 2' some `cut and paste' lazy idol worship or `highlights package' of more popular artists in the field. Rather, if given fair, patient and close repeated listens, it offers glimpses of worlds he may go on to explore in even greater personal depth in the future, but even for now this superior second effort is still an unhurried (but never uneventful) and deeply immersive soundtrack full of space that weaves a captivating atmosphere.

Four stars.

 Cosmic Ground 2 by COSMIC GROUND album cover Studio Album, 2015
3.97 | 13 ratings

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Cosmic Ground 2
Cosmic Ground Progressive Electronic

Review by BrufordFreak
Collaborator Honorary Collaborator

5 stars Great retro electronica/Kosmische Music from ELECTRIC ORANGE's keyboard player, Dirk Jan Müller.

1. "Sol" (19:23) opens with a couple of minutes of distant-sounding industrial sounds playing around in the background soundscape. In the third minute a TANGERINE DREAM-like computer-synth sequence emerges, rises and proceeds to dominate until around 5:20 when other sounds (organ) are beginning to emerge---though not enough to commit to the weave for a good minute or more. The increasing volume of the top end of the oscillating sound waves (approximately 60 seconds per cycle) is very effective--and the clarity lends to its pleasurability. This is, truly, like a prime TD song (e.g. "Coldwater Canyon" sans electric guitar) only recorded/produced with the advantages of 21st Century technologies. (9/10)

2. "NGC 224" (18:40) awesome electronica in the TANGERINE DREAM vein. The electronic drum sound sequenced sounds a bit 'off' to me but the progressions and evolution of the song throughout its nearly 19 minute length make up for it. (9/10)

3. "Organia" (19:43) opens with wave after wave of synth chords, washing ashore due to the slow flange effect. At the five minute mark the hypnotic rhythm sequence is introduced, slowly rises in sound level, as the synth waves recede. Gradually, other keyboard sounds, notes, riffs, and waves are introduced/added to enrich the sound palate- -but the programmed sequence is awesome on its own. Beginning at about the 13 minute mark, the bottom drops out: the music begins to slowly fade (the treble side, for sure) virtually disappears before slowly flanging back to a loud crescendo--a pattern that continues over the next two minutes until we are left with one long sustained bass chord and Mellotron voices. By 15:30 a layered reed-like buzzing sound is introduced and quickly takes over. The rhythm sequence is gone, all that is left is the rise and fall of this ominous buzz chord--which plays out to the end. Were it not for the exceedingly slow and drawn out--and fairly simple--development, this would be a sure-fire masterpiece. (8/10)

4. "Altair" (20:09) opens with some sustained, high pitched crystalline notes--could be organ, could be glass harmonium. The weave is joined by some eerie noises and minimalist STEVE REICH-like sounds, notes and chords. Feels like a walk through the night woods in a horror film. Fortunately, there are no "Tubular Bells"-like sudden noises jumping out at you in the first six minutes. In the sixth minute, however, there is a brief four-note riff (arpeggio) from what sounds like a computerized guitar that rises into prominence and dominance in a quite ominous way. It feels as if something is approaching--something mysterious and powerful, if of low and/or tired intelligence, that a woods-walker would want to avoid/hide from. By the 10:00 mark the intruder has passed; it's probably safe to emerge. But we don't. For another minute and a half we wait--until the very last strains of the maurading lurker have passed. Then organ chord changes indicate a slight change of perspective--perhaps one as little as a turn of the head--and then again--but no movement from this safe hiding place. Observation, listening, hypervigilance, heightened senses, distrust and fear keep the woods-walker glued to his spot. Our patience and caution are rewarded as in the sixteenth minute a distant moan or haunting voice is borne on the wind. Not close but not far--and getting closer?! At 16:45 it sounds as if we have launched--running--away--speeding through the woods away from the witch voice, away from the trail of the massive Lurker, running at near break-neck speed through the woods. The run begins to feel timeless, spaceless, as noise and sensory input seem to fade away leaving us . . . in our bed, awake, soaked in sweat. What a dream! What a brilliant musical journey! (10/10)

This is so close to being a masterpiece of progressive rock music--the only thing it is lacking is something new, fresh, or innovative to contribute to the "progress" of the Electronic/Kosmische Music subgenres.

 Cosmic Ground 2 by COSMIC GROUND album cover Studio Album, 2015
3.97 | 13 ratings

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Cosmic Ground 2
Cosmic Ground Progressive Electronic

Review by Rivertree
Special Collaborator PSIKE Team & Band Submissions

3 stars On this occasion underway on solo paths with his project COSMIC GROUND this is Dirk Jan Müller, predominantly known as the member of ELECTRIC ORANGE as well as the SPACE INVADERS. Currently both are rather innovative bands hailing from the rising space and neo krautrock scene in Germany. It doesn't go without notice - here we have the second workout released for this project. Besides hammond and mellotron Dirk is having a huge arsenal of analogue synthesizer tools at hand again.

That means you'll have to await a more retro styled album in general, filled with floating spacey patterns and looping repetitive sequencer motifs influenced by Tangerine Dream, Popol Vuh, Manuel Göttsching and similiar. Conceived for a double vinyl release most likely, four extended songs are given, all equipped with a length of around twenty minutes. Way more organ drenched the closing Altair partition is differing from the other songs. This one has evolved to my album highlight within the recent listening sessions due to its magnificent flow.

While certainly entering the cosmic ground CG 2 is a solid contribution to the widespread progressive electronic field. Although Dirk does not really reach for a new niche with his compositions, it's definitely well done - gripping either way, but also a matter of relaxing excercises when trying to put your feet up. It solely depends on your current mood what particular section you might prefer. Just give it a try!

Thanks to Philippe Blache for the artist addition. and to Quinino for the last updates

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