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BRIAN ENO

Progressive Electronic • United Kingdom


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Brian Eno biography
Brian Peter George St John le Baptiste de la Salle Eno - Born 15 May 1948 (Woodbridge, UK)

There has never been an artist more mystic (in the prog world, anyway) than Brian Eno. He has had many occupations that have influenced many musicians: he was the founding father of ambient music (though some might give him no small amount of flak for starting new age slop), a glam rocker, an expert at the synthesizer and many other strange electronic devices, a producer of hits for U2 and Talking Heads, an explorer of non-western musical themes and, as he was known to everyone who liked him, a "non-musician."

Growing up in the town of Suffolk (which was close to a American Air Force camp), he became fascinated by music when listening to doo wop and R&B on the Armed Forces radio stations. He later developed an interest towards avant-garde composers like John Cage and Terry Riley. In 1971, he became a member of the seminal rock band ROXY MUSIC. Eno joined them because he knew how to operate a certain synthesizer that none of the other members could. Some rock fans thought that he was gay because he wore makeup and women's clothing. His unusual appearance was offstaging the ROXY MUSIC frontman Bryan Ferry, who began to grow agitated as a result. After several fights with Ferry, Eno quit ROXY MUSIC to record some albums of his own sound.

The first album with Eno's name on it was 1973's "No Pussyfooting", an early ambient venture that he recorded with fellow EG Records recording artist Robert Fripp (most famous as the guitarist of KING CRIMSON). Most of the album was a Gibson Les Paul played by Fripp running through a tape-delay system. This new method would be dubbed "Frippertronics," a system that Fripp would later use in his solo career. (The sampling of sounds later set the stage for electronica and hip-hop.) Eno's first true solo album was 1973's "Here Come The Warm Jets", which managed to make the Top 30 in the UK. This time around, Eno had a glam rock sound that David Bowie and QUEEN had popularized. The album proved so critically popular that Eno (even though he was in poor health) decided to tour. The tour was cancelled shortly because of a collapsed lung.

In 1974, he released "Taking Tiger Mountain" (By Strategy), which was a similar collection of free form rock songs. Shortly after the album was released, a serious car accident left Eno bedridden for several months. While in th...
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BRIAN ENO discography


Ordered by release date | Showing ratings (top albums) | Help Progarchives.com to complete the discography and add albums

BRIAN ENO top albums (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

3.74 | 202 ratings
Here Come The Warm Jets
1973
3.69 | 178 ratings
Taking Tiger Mountain (By Strategy)
1974
3.98 | 325 ratings
Another Green World
1975
3.46 | 113 ratings
Discreet Music
1975
3.80 | 207 ratings
Before And After Science
1977
3.33 | 94 ratings
Music For Films
1978
3.64 | 198 ratings
Ambient 1 - Music For Airports
1978
3.78 | 78 ratings
Eno, Moebius & Roedelius: After The Heat
1978
3.95 | 149 ratings
Brian Eno & David Byrne: My Life In The Bush Of Ghosts
1981
4.06 | 188 ratings
Ambient 4 - On Land
1982
3.82 | 122 ratings
Apollo - Atmospheres & Soundtracks (OST)
1983
2.82 | 28 ratings
More Music For Films [Aka: Music For Films - Vol. 2]
1983
3.32 | 60 ratings
Thursday Afternoon
1985
2.49 | 21 ratings
Music For Films III
1988
2.79 | 46 ratings
Eno & Cale: Wrong Way Up
1990
2.27 | 46 ratings
Nerve Net
1992
2.82 | 35 ratings
The Shutov Assembly
1992
3.15 | 39 ratings
Neroli - Thinking Music Part IV
1993
1.80 | 10 ratings
Headcandy
1994
2.95 | 20 ratings
Eno & Wobble: Spinner
1995
2.72 | 36 ratings
The Drop
1997
2.22 | 9 ratings
Lightness - Music For The Marble Palace
1997
3.08 | 12 ratings
I Dormienti
1999
3.57 | 29 ratings
Brian Eno & J. Peter Schwalm: Drawn From Life
2001
2.15 | 13 ratings
January 07003 - Bell Studies For The Clock Of The Long Now
2003
3.74 | 71 ratings
Another Day On Earth
2005
3.94 | 86 ratings
Small Craft On A Milk Sea
2010
3.59 | 35 ratings
Brian Eno & Rick Holland: Drums Between The Bells
2011
3.33 | 24 ratings
Lux
2012
3.14 | 19 ratings
Eno & Hyde: Someday World
2014
3.09 | 18 ratings
Eno & Hyde: High Life
2014
2.50 | 6 ratings
My Squelchy Life
2015
3.63 | 21 ratings
The Ship
2016
3.73 | 26 ratings
Reflection
2017
0.00 | 0 ratings
Brian & Roger Eno: Mixing Colours
2020

BRIAN ENO Live Albums (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

3.04 | 4 ratings
Dali's Car (with Winkies and 801)
1999

BRIAN ENO Videos (DVD, Blu-ray, VHS etc)

3.92 | 6 ratings
Thursday Afternoon
1984
4.04 | 7 ratings
14 Video Paintings
2005
4.13 | 5 ratings
77 Million Paintings
2006

BRIAN ENO Boxset & Compilations (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

0.00 | 0 ratings
Working Backwards: 1983-1973
1983
3.58 | 7 ratings
Begegnungen (with Dieter Moebius, Hans-Joachim Roedelius & Conrad Plank)
1984
2.30 | 4 ratings
Begegnungen II (with Dieter Moebius, Hans-Joachim Roedelius & Conrad Plank)
1985
2.53 | 5 ratings
Desert Island Selection
1986
0.00 | 0 ratings
More Blank Than Frank
1986
0.00 | 0 ratings
1989
1989
3.50 | 4 ratings
Textures
1989
3.12 | 6 ratings
Eno Box II: Vocals
1993
4.11 | 8 ratings
Eno Box I: Instrumentals
1994
0.00 | 0 ratings
Generative Music 1
1996
3.00 | 1 ratings
Sonora Portraits
1999
3.09 | 4 ratings
Curiosities, Vol. 1
2003
3.49 | 3 ratings
Curiosities Vol. 2
2004
3.88 | 6 ratings
More Music For Films
2005
0.00 | 0 ratings
Music for Installations
2018

BRIAN ENO Official Singles, EPs, Fan Club & Promo (CD, EP/LP, MC, Digital Media Download)

0.00 | 0 ratings
Third Uncle
1974
0.00 | 0 ratings
Seven Deadly Finns
1974
0.00 | 0 ratings
The Lion Sleeps Tonight
1975
0.00 | 0 ratings
King's Lead Hat
1978
4.33 | 3 ratings
Robert Sheckley's In A Land Of Clear Colors (with Pete Sinfield)
1979
0.00 | 0 ratings
Brian Eno & David Byrne - The Jezebel Spirit
1981
0.00 | 0 ratings
Rarities
1983
0.00 | 0 ratings
Silver Morning / Deep Blue Day (Brian Eno, Daniel Lanois & Roger Eno)
1983
0.00 | 0 ratings
Brain Eno & John Cale
1990
3.50 | 2 ratings
Ali Click
1992
1.05 | 3 ratings
Fractal Zoom
1992
3.00 | 4 ratings
Music For White Cube
1997
0.00 | 0 ratings
Contra 1.2 (Untitled 24:53)
1997
3.00 | 5 ratings
Kite Stories
1999
4.00 | 1 ratings
Music For Onmyo-Ji
2000
3.00 | 2 ratings
Music For Civic Recovery Centre
2000
2.60 | 5 ratings
Compact Forest Proposal
2001
4.00 | 1 ratings
How Many Worlds
2005
4.00 | 1 ratings
This
2005
3.50 | 2 ratings
Making Space
2006
3.33 | 3 ratings
Panic Of Looking
2011
3.00 | 3 ratings
Sisters
2017
3.00 | 2 ratings
Brian Eno with Kevin Shields- The Weight Of History / Only Once Away My Son
2018

BRIAN ENO Reviews


Showing last 10 reviews only
 Another Green World by ENO, BRIAN album cover Studio Album, 1975
3.98 | 325 ratings

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Another Green World
Brian Eno Progressive Electronic

Review by siLLy puPPy
Collaborator PSIKE, JR/F/Canterbury & Eclectic Teams

4 stars BRIAN ENO left Roxy Music in 1973 after a couple of albums having grown tired of the limitations of rock stardom and had the desire to expand his horizons into more experimental musical ambitions however on his first two solo albums "Here Come The Warm Jets" and "Taking Tiger Mountain (By Strategy)" he still latched onto the glam rock sounds that made Roxy Music such a legend although ENO certainly reimagined them to his liking and in the process crafted two classic art pop albums that were highly influential. Indeed those albums sounded like nothing else the 70s had to offer and when it came to ENO's third solo release ANOTHER GREEN WORLD he was starting to shed the glam rock sounds of his early professional career and was heading more in the direction of where his collaboration with Robert Fripp on "Pussyfooting" was heading.

ANOTHER GREEN WORLD was released in September 1975 and basically served as a juncture where his previous glam rock leanings coexisted side by side with the ambient and electronic sounds that would emerge on the next album "Discreet Music" that would follow a few months later in December. The results gave ANOTHER GREEN WORLD a distinct unique hybridization effect unheard on any other ENO album and one that has gained a loyal cult following ever since for its innovative approach of incorporating aspects of progressive electronic sounds woven into catchy art pop compositions. Like the albums before, ENO solicited the help of a few friends. Robert Fripp joined in for three tracks, the most adventurous being the fiery guitar solos with his wimshurst guitar on "St. Elmo's Fire." Likewise Phil Collins from Genesis contributed to a few tracks as well as the Velvet Underground's John Cale. Several others were included as well.
 Added to that ENO employed his outsider views of how to craft new innovative sounds such as electric guitars played with mallets which were electronically modified to sound like castanets as well as crafting something called the Leslie piano which fed acoustic piano sounds through a Leslie speaker. Other innovations on the guitar meant that ANOTHER GREEN WORLD showcased some very unorthodox guitar sounds unlike anything else ever recorded. This album wasn't successful in the commercial world but impressed the insiders of the music world and has since then gone down as a classic of innovative art rock from the mid-70s. ENO was also busy after his Roxy Music days with numerous collaborations which included his most famous example with Robert Fripp in the form of "No Pussyfooting" as well as other with Kevin Ayers, Nico, Lady June and Phil Manzanera.

The year 1975 was a tough one for ENO when in January he was hit by a taxi and forced to spend some downtime at home but in the process discovered that a broken channel of his stereo led to new inspirations of how to manipulate sound dynamics. This led to his interest in ambient sounds which led to "Discreet Music" but also altered his perceptions on how to record ANOTHER GREEN WORLD. For the most part, ANOTHER GREEN WORLD consists of two distinct types of tracks. One style is the pure chilled out ambient tracks that directly points to his future releases and the others are sort of leftover from his art pop albums that preceded except that the vocals that are pretty much in the same style as "Tiger" and "Jets" are crafted over more electronic musical accompaniments rather than glam rock, however they still have enough rock elements to be classified as such. While many cite this as one of ENO's zenith performances, i don't quite find it to be so perfect. Due to the inconsistencies of random snippets of electronica appearing between the art pop tracks, the album has sort of a disjointed feel to it unlike the albums that came before and would soon emerge after. Not that any of the tracks are bad in any way but some of the electronic only performances are rather forgettable.

At this point ENO was a huge underground superstar behind the scenes in the music industry even if he wasn't exactly a household name. His unorthodox creativity made him quite sought after in the studio as a producer and beyond. He would continue to create highly innovative ambient albums alone and then with artists like Cluster, David Bowie and Phil Manzanera's 801. While i much prefer the glam rock albums that came before or the pure ambient ones soon to be released, there's no denying that ANOTHER GREEN WORLD is an excellent innovative slice of ambient pop with some of the most clever means of production. ENO was a master of crafting catchy tunes with a receptive bass line but exploring bizarre avant-garde arenas with the changing structures that layered over the simple rhythmic grooves. The most widely used word for his style of music that encompassed his first three albums is simply "quirky," and i can't think of a better description than that to sum it all up succinctly.

 Ambient 1 - Music For Airports by ENO, BRIAN album cover Studio Album, 1978
3.64 | 198 ratings

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Ambient 1 - Music For Airports
Brian Eno Progressive Electronic

Review by Kempokid
Collaborator Prog Metal Team

4 stars It's undeniable that Brian Eno's Ambient 1 is an album that has garnered much attention and interest as the years have gone by, and how could it not with such a formidable reputation behind it? Being coined as one of the landmark ambient albums is quite the title to live up to, and especially intriguing with a genre as abstract as this, after all, what exact qualities would actually go into creating an amazingly regarded ambient album? Listening through this album makes me think that it's definitely partially how it can create a mood and be beautiful, all without ever being distracting in nature, alternatively, as Eno himself put it "Ignorable as it is interesting". While I definitely believe that this album's legacy is a large part of the acclaim it still gets to this day, I also definitely see the appeal in it, despite personally finding other ambient projects to be somewhat more engaging throughout.

The composition of each track on this album as a whole represents a very minimal sense of progression throughout, relatively short loops repeating for long periods of time as subtle changes are made in order to accompany the serene, beautiful atmosphere as a whole. These subtle changes are what really add that quality to the music where it is able to be intently listened to without feeling boring. 1/1 demonstrates this in the best way, the forefront being centred around a central, minimalistic piano melody that feels as if it loops around endlessly, with low droning permeating the majority of the track, creating an absolutely perfect atmosphere that's immersive without being attention grabbing, able to appeal to both those listening to this in the background, while having a lot to love when closely focusing on the smaller details. The most impressive thing about this track and why it stands out so clearly from most other ambient material is how it is one of the single most relaxing pieces of music I've come across, with such memorability despite being so minimalistic. The tracks that make use of what sounds like a choir Are also quite intriguing to me for being able to sound so grandiose and powerful with so little to work from. The looping feels far less obvious here as well, due to the primary melody being far less defined, providing a more hypnotic experience that I also enjoy quite a bit, even if I find it to end extremely abruptly whenever that particular track ends, breaking some of the immersion to some extent, along with overall sounding a bit hollow. I personally feel that this is an album that there really isn't much to talk about outside of what I've mentioned, as it follows a very similar sort of sound and approach throughout with the same core features, really nailing the beauty regardless.

I can definitely see both sides of the argument for and against this album, given how this is so pleasant and singular in its appraoch that it's quite easy to understand possible distaste people would have towards this, especially with the amount of more multifaceted ambient out there, even by Eno himself. That said, this very singular, cohesive approach allows the atmosphere and tone it sets to absolutely flourish and create a truly beautiful experience, even if it can feel a bit lacking at times in the process. Nonetheless, I believe that this is a worthwhile album to at least give a listen to once, especially if you're interested in ambient music, because no matter what way you look at it, this is an album that is considered an absolute landmark despite its shortcomings in areas, and I for one think that much of the praise it gets is deserved, as this is a wonderfully calming, beautiful album.

Verdict: An ambient classic that manages to make loops repeated ad nauseum a surprisingly compelling, lovely listen, especially with the amazing tone and atmosphere it has throughout, but definitely simplistic regardless.

 Ambient 1 - Music For Airports by ENO, BRIAN album cover Studio Album, 1978
3.64 | 198 ratings

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Ambient 1 - Music For Airports
Brian Eno Progressive Electronic

Review by patrickq
Prog Reviewer

2 stars Whether or not this is truly the first album of ambient music, as some here claim, I recognize its importance. I also respect Brian Eno as an experimental composer and as an important figure in late-twentieth-century music. Furthermore, I not only appreciate, but actively enjoy, some music that I would define as "ambient," "experimental," and/or "minimalist," including some of the works of Pauline Oliveros, Steve Reich, and Wendy Carlos - - artists who I personally feel have a place on this site. In particular, I would assign five stars to Carlos's Sonic Seasonings, an ambient work from 1972 which, like Ambient 1: Music for Airports is non- virtuosic background music.

There are also many fine albums which have been labeled "new age," fairly or not. Some albums widely accepted as new age aren't bad - - Deep Breakfast (Ray Lynch) and some of Kitaro's work come to mind - - but count me among those who feel as though these works generally fail to reflect the kind of musicianship that fans of progressive rock respect. Put new age and ambient together and you have a recipient for... blandness? Anyway, Music for Airports fits my definition of "new age music" - - and specifically that kind of ambient new age which is inoffensive and boring.

That's especially true of side one and roughly the first ten minutes of side two. Partway through "1/2," once the piano exits, a more purely ambient section begins. This reminds me of some of the works of Klaus Schulze - - one of my favorite purveyors of any genre of music. The fourth and final track of Music for Airports, "2/2," is also a bit less new-agey, and these sections represent my rationale for awarding two stars.

Ambient 1: Music for Airports is historically important, and even side one, which is definitely one-star material, is not bad as much as it accounts for time better spent listening to something else. In this sense, it achieves Eno's goal of creating soothing but, as he put it, "ignorable," art.

 Taking Tiger Mountain (By Strategy) by ENO, BRIAN album cover Studio Album, 1974
3.69 | 178 ratings

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Taking Tiger Mountain (By Strategy)
Brian Eno Progressive Electronic

Review by siLLy puPPy
Collaborator PSIKE, JR/F/Canterbury & Eclectic Teams

5 stars Having been freed as a member of Roxy Music, BRIAN ENO wasted no time delving into his myriad projects with not only one but two super strong solo albums emerging in 1974. The first release "Here Come The Warm Jets" managed to forge a new branch of the glam rock meets art pop started out by Roxy Music albeit with a completely new indie pop quirk absent from Bryan Ferry's vernacular. At the tail end of the year ENO unleashed his second offering in the form of the bizarrely titled TAKING TIGER MOUNTAIN (BY STRATEGY) which was meant to be a loose concept album inspired by a series of postcards of a Chinese revolutionary opera. The themes and concepts attempt to tackle everything from espionage to the Chinese Communist revolution and found ENO taking a darker tone lyrically all the while crafting a bouncier and more upbeat art pop sound than his debut.

TAKING TIGER MOUNTAIN (BY STRATEGY) also focuses on a core of five musicians without the lengthy roster of guest musicians on the debut. From his Roxy Music days he was joined by Phil Manzanera on guitars as well as Brian Turrington on bass, Freddie Smith on drums and a special guest appearance by none other than Robert Wyatt who provided percussion as well as backing vocals. Manzanera is notable for being a prime player on the album with not only his stellar guitar contributions but his role in assistant producer which allows an anything goes sort of approach to the album and as a result exudes an air of eccentricity above and beyond anything in the Roxy Music playbook. To further the mystique of the album, ENO and his friend Peter Schmidt developed a set of instruction cards called Oblique Strategies that would dictate certain decisions about the recording process, therefore completely random ideas were thrown in on the mere whim of which card dictated what, an eccentricity that ENO was famous for entertaining.

While lyrically TAKING TIGER MOUNTAIN (BY STRATEGY) is connected by a nebulous conceptual theme of sorts, musically the album is all over the place with quirky indie pop hooks and the peculiar the only commonalities. Right from the very first notes of "Burning Airlines Give You So Much More," it's apparent that the pop hooks are heavily embellished by off-kilter out of tune counterpoints, slightly off center harmonic overdubs and intricate little guitar riffs that sound as if they are on the verge of complete abandonment but somehow finding resounding resolution. The jittery marching rhythms that exude tracks like "Back In Judy's Jungle" find themselves popping up in unexpected ways and early doses of post-punk even find their way in Turrington's bass abuse on the ahead of its time "Third Uncle" which distinguishes the accidental playing of a key finding its way into legendary status especially after having been covered by Bauhaus.

Despite the effort to create a less abrasive and more minimalistic album that forged a more uniform sound, TAKING TIGER MOUNTAIN (BY STRATEGY) is a monstrously wild album that traverses the quirkiest aspects of avant-pop coupled with the earliest forms of art rock teased out into a never ending series of arhythmic patterns, cannonades of jangle guitar and Asian overtones. The post-punk connections cannot be understated as many post-Sex Pistols punk rockers have taken many of the more aggressive aspects of TAKING TIGER MOUNTAIN to heart. ENO single handedly managed to give birth to an incredibly diverse mix of styles that remain influential in the modern day. Through the wild and woolly glam rock ride of "The True Wheel" to the more subdued title track that ends the album and points to a more electronically infused future, this sophomore album unleashes a surprisingly diverse palette of indie quirk.

Like many of the early ENO albums, TAKING TIGER MOUNTAIN (BY STRATEGY) exudes an uncanny prescience of musical trends that hadn't yet come into fruition. ENO always seemed like he had his hands on an invisible pulse that only came into the limelight years later. This album percolates an infinite number of ideas that would eventually express themselves in much larger musical scenes. It's hard to believe that BRIAN ENO is mostly known for his ambient and electronic music when such Earth shattering indie rock found on his earliest recordings exists. This is some of the most fascinating music to exist in a rock context and while it's utterly infectious even upon first exposure, it contains just enough weirdness to continue to be exciting decades after its inception. For my money, this second offering of 1974 is a step above the first and that's a pretty tall order. Nerd music for nerd's paradise.

 Ambient 1 - Music For Airports by ENO, BRIAN album cover Studio Album, 1978
3.64 | 198 ratings

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Ambient 1 - Music For Airports
Brian Eno Progressive Electronic

Review by Chaser

3 stars Utterly soporific!

Brian Eno was almost right, but this is not music for airports, it is music for airplanes, and especially for airplanes on long haul flights.

I have always had terrible trouble sleeping on long haul flights. I remember one long haul flight from Hong Kong to Perth where I sat bolt upright in the dark for 8 hours whilst everyone else slept. Horrific!

But then I discovered Brian Eno and his "Music for Airports", and my long haul flying experience was changed forever.

Now I take this album with me on every long haul flight, and by a third of the way through 1/1 I'm sleeping like a baby.

It's easy to describe the tracks on this album:

1/1 DING DONG DING DONG DONG DING. Repeat for 16.39 minutes.

1/2 AAAAAAAAAAA. UUUUUUUUUUU. AAAAAAAAAA. UUUUUUUUUU. Repeat for 8.25 minutes

1/2 TING. AAAAAAAAAAAA. TING TINGALING. AAAAAAAAAA. TING TINGALING. Repeat for 11.36 minutes

2/2 HOOOOOT. PAAAAAAARP. HOOOOOOOOT. PAAAAAARP. HOOOOOOT. Repeat for 9.38 minutes

Still the sounds are all very melodic and soothing, albeit with the effect of Chinese water torture.

This is not an album for collectors or fans only, this is an album for insomniacs everywhere!

It should be prescribed by doctors. Throw away those sleeping pills and get your hands on a copy of Brian Eno. I swear by it.

Take this album on your next long haul flight, and I can guarantee you won't be disappointed.

Before the end of track one, you'll be away with the fairies.

Let's start counting stars. One, two, three, zzzzzzzzzzzzzz...

 Eno & Cale: Wrong Way Up by ENO, BRIAN album cover Studio Album, 1990
2.79 | 46 ratings

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Eno & Cale: Wrong Way Up
Brian Eno Progressive Electronic

Review by TCat
Special Collaborator Eclectic / Prog Metal / Heavy Prog Team

3 stars This is truly an underrated album. It is also very unexpected. When you hear of Brian Eno and John Cale doing an album together, you would expect maybe ambience or at least very experimental music. You would be mistaken. This album has some of the most accessible music either artist has been involved in. But, believe me, it does not make it a bad album. Yes it is lacking somewhat in progressiveness, but the faster songs are so cheery and catchy that you have to sing along. And the harmonies, mostly based on heavy layering, are excellent to the "nth" degree. That is what I love about it most is the harmonies, sort of like a more modern Moody Blues type harmony, but better.

The first track is sung by Eno, but I would imagine it involves auto tune, because I have never heard him sing like this. The violin and keyboards are exiting and catchy. The same feeling melds into the next track "One World", even more upbeat with Eno and Cale both sharing vocals with lots of harmony. "In the Backroom" is a slower tempo and more of what you would expect with the vocals more subdued and no harmonies, just singing by Cale. The rhythm is consistent throughout, but there are some interesting things going on in the instrumentation. "Empty Frame" has a nice mid tempo swing feeling to it. Eno has lead vocals on this and there is some brass involved in the background and there are some harmonies here, but not as choir like as before. The guitar towards the middle is nice, but it's mixed a little deep. Vocals again seem too perfect for Eno, but it still sounds great.

"Cordoba" is a very laid back slow song lead by Cale. This one is more ambient and slightly experimental sounding, but it is not typical enough to be considered pop. It is a lot darker than anything that has come previously, so probably more what you would have expected from these two. Very sparse and the voice is solo with limited harmonics and some distortion in the orchestration towards the end giving it a unsettling feeling. "Spinning Away" is more of a nice, funky feeling with that feeling being provided by a strumming guitar while the keyboards are smooth creating a nice contrast. Eno has lead on this one and the beautifully layered and uplifting harmonics are back. The stings are back on this one too, and give this song great atmosphere. "Footsteps" is a mid-tempo song sung by Cale and is very 80s sounding especially with the synth melodies going on here. This one would have fit well on any Wang Chung album, in other words, I don't care for it as much.

Cale leads again on the next song "Been There, Done That". This one is upbeat and was released as a single and actually had some success. It is decent, but I would have picked one of the other previous upbeat songs for the single. But it has memorable lyrics that are easy to sing along with. "Crime in the Desert" has a nice piano hook that plays though the song, upbeat once again and a return to the layered harmonics that are so appealing. The synths are reminiscent of a more upbeat Vangelis tune. This one is the 3rd in a row lead by Cale. The last track on the original release is "The River" and is lead by Eno. This on has an annoying computerized drum and keyboard loop that changes chords with the vocals. It is more subdued like "Cordoba", but not as experimental. Eno's voice has an echo to it, giving it a slightly mysterious sound. The chorus is nice with the vocals, but it can remind you of sitting around a campfire singing and once you get that visual, it gets a little corny. Since the original had only 10 tracks, by this time it was starting to wear out it's welcome, so it ended at the perfect place.

The remastered version released in 2005 had 2 bonus tracks, but 1 of those tracks was different in the UK and the US. "Grandfather's House" was the UK bonus track. It is a slow ambient song, but the electric piano or vibe is a little annoying and reminds you of the terrible late 70s, early 80s Chicago albums. However, the lyrics are nice. "You Don't Miss Your Water" was the track available in both the UK and US versions. This one is better, but it is still slow with no percussion. It is driven with guitar this time, so it's not tacky like the previous one. It also has the layered harmonics. "Palanquin" was the bonus track in the US that replaced "Grandfather's House". Out of the two different bonus tracks, "Palanquin" is better in that it uses acoustic piano instead of electric, so it's not so dated sounding. It is a beautiful, atmospheric track, all instrumental, and with a new age feel, but still nice.

Overall, I really love this album and I did the first time I heard it. I do admit that it tends to wear itself out towards the end, but the bonus tracks, at least on the US reissue, do breathe life back into the album at the end. I know there isn't much there that is considered progressive, but the harmonics push this far and above any typical pop music out there. I consider it an excellent addition to my collection, but not to my prog music collection. So I have to settle for a "Good" rating, but it's pushing the 4 star rating.

 Discreet Music by ENO, BRIAN album cover Studio Album, 1975
3.46 | 113 ratings

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Discreet Music
Brian Eno Progressive Electronic

Review by aglasshouse

5 stars Brian Eno is often thought of the thinking man of progressive music. Although many thinking men exist in the genre, Eno was the one who thought the hardest, particularly in both the abstract and the minimalist. The way he perceived music as a whole both in how it's psychologically defined and how it exists in space were paramount in bringing a new mindset to the pop music world.

However when you take all this and compress it down into one album, it garners a different look. Specifically, one tagged as "ambient". In recent years this term has a stigma attached to it, and generally will cause a quick dismissal from those who you bring it up to. Sure, countless very simple projects have also called themselves ambient, but as Eno has stated, what ambient really means is practically impossible to pin down these days. Mr. Eno may be a bit forgetful however, as he seems to have forgotten that he practically created modern ambient electronic music back in 1975. Discreet Music is one of the most unadulterated expressions of noise and vibration, a sound that seems disembodied from human thought and is something that just purely....exists. Of course Kraftwerk often experimented with ambient/avant-garde electronics before Eno even began working with Robert Fripp in 1973, but what Kraftwerk either didn't care to or failed to realize at the time that ambient music is what Eno created; sprawling, hour-or-more- long, meandering behemoths of various rhythmic tones and electronic fluidity that do well to not branch off uncomfortably by being overly dynamic. This not only creates a pleasant sound, but also removes the chance of having any slip ups if you go off the avant-garde deep end, which even Eno has done in the past. Kraftwerk understood the meaning of this quite well even before Eno did, with 1974's Autobahn epic replete with vehicle imagery, but it took another year for another musician to perfect it, and that just so happened to be Eno.

The rest of the album aside from the title track epic is three different variations of Canon in D Major by Johann Pachelbel. While not being the centrepiece, Eno's interpretations of the classic 'Pachabel's Canon' which, while being in basic terms the same Canon you've heard for years, are indeed testaments to Eno's mixing of industrial music with the classical. 'Fullness of the Wind' I believe is the best of the three.

What I think Discreet Music represents is a wholesome and unbroken part of Eno's career, which both represents a then stepping stone but also a timeless element in one of the most prolific electronic musician's music. That, and it's a signal for other artists even today to expound on it to find the deepest crevasses the human spirit can travel to. Either that, or I'm just blowing it out of proportion. Part of me, though, thinks I'm right.

 Sisters by ENO, BRIAN album cover Singles/EPs/Fan Club/Promo, 2017
3.00 | 3 ratings

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Sisters
Brian Eno Progressive Electronic

Review by admireArt
Prog Reviewer

3 stars An unexpected event....

An app for those who paid in full for Brian Eno's "REFLECTION", 2017, at its special priced edition, which would have allowed users to fiddle around with the algorithms of any given music piece, therefore being able to virtually interact and recreate an imprint of personal touch to the piece(s),, but due to the Brexit, the pre-order price became unresonable to do business with, so in able to work things out for both artist and consumer, ENO gave birth instead to this "Generative Music" recorded sampler "SISTERS" (2017) and was given out as a free download (consolation prize), until the end of February, as a way of saying thanks to those eagerly waiting for the app+album, which never came to be.

Well, SISTERS,without its unavoidable red tape is ,to put it simply, 4 remixes of one piece EP, sequenced (remixed) by Peter Chilvers, who is himself, alongside Eno, the technical wizard behind the interactive software's planning and creation.

This kind of conceptual presentation is no stranger in Brian Eno's ever changing discography and sonic/visual installations. He possesses a truly healthy iconclastic spirit, even if those icons are his own.

Peaceful, bright and perfect pitch in detail (Eno's "Ambient Music" oriented) the four versions are intriguing by themselves, the subtle alterations between each one accentuate the myriad of possibilities any composer faces on a daily basis, yet opens the door by crashing the monumental task, of having to choose a single option.

***3 PA stars.

 Eno & Hyde: High Life by ENO, BRIAN album cover Studio Album, 2014
3.09 | 18 ratings

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Eno & Hyde: High Life
Brian Eno Progressive Electronic

Review by Neu!mann
Prog Reviewer

3 stars One of the more enjoyable and accessible of Brian Eno's recent efforts has its roots in the fertile soil he was cultivating with David Byrne in the early '80s, updated to a modern digital vernacular. A few of the songs ("DBF" being the obvious example) could have been outtakes from the "Remain in Light" album sessions, and the artwork itself is a visual echo of Peter Saville's video image on the cover of the Eno/Byrne classic "My Life in the Bush of Ghosts".

But this was 2014, not 1981, and much of the new album sounds like it was composed and performed on laptop computers, with minimal human input on traditional instruments. On the other hand, when the end results are so playful and creative does it really matter how they were generated? For an artist once known as a self-confessed funkophobe (in his immediate post-Roxy Music adolescence), Eno certainly has his groove on here.

Not for the first time, of course. He embraced Funk and Afrobeat rhythms long ago, with the Talking Heads and other kindred spirits, but rarely to such a plugged-in degree. I defy even the clumsiest left-footed Proghead to hear the bouncy "Time to Waste It" or the more upbeat "Lilac" and resist the temptation to oscillate his hips, just a little.

In the end it's a fascinating detour for the otherwise ambient artisan, and definitely a collaboration. Eno's finger (and voice) prints are all over the album, and yet he's often the second banana next to guitarist and Grooveboxer Karl Hyde (yes, the Groovebox is a real thing: part drum machine, part sequencer, part computer hard drive). Not to worry, though: he may have only been along for the ride, but Eno was still the primary navigator, as always demonstrating his unerring sense of musical direction.

[ Consumer endorsement: the vinyl edition of the album is by far the best bargain, and not just for old-time's sake. It includes two songs omitted from the CD, for no apparent reason except, of course, the demands of petty commerce. The first ("On a Grey Day") is a dreamy ballad and soundscape collage, crooned with melodic resignation; the second ("Slow Down, Sit Down & Breathe") presents a more urgent and aggressive electro-pop thing, with deadpan spoken vocals atop a busy rhythm guitar. Both would have fit on the compact disc, with room to spare ]

 The Ship by ENO, BRIAN album cover Studio Album, 2016
3.63 | 21 ratings

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The Ship
Brian Eno Progressive Electronic

Review by Neu!mann
Prog Reviewer

4 stars Brian Eno's best album in years strikes a lopsided balance between his purely ambient abstractions and the more song-centered performances from his feather-boa'd youth, but it definitely leans far closer toward the minimalist end of his musical spectrum. Imagine a typical Eno pop song, slowed down to below 16 rpm and stretched out over 21-minutes in length, and you'll have a pretty good idea of what to expect.

There's a dreamlike lack of clarity to the music, as if The Ship of the album's title (supposedly RMS Titanic, in her final agony) was running at quarter-speed through dense fog. Eno's artfully auto-tuned singing adds just the right touch of maritime angst, resembling the lonesome chantey of an old sea dog on the evening's last watch aboard a four-masted windjammer.

The long title track grows progressively more weird, as the dying ocean liner presumably settles to the North Atlantic sea floor. More accessible melodies then begin to emerge in the three-part "Fickle Sun", but the overall mood remains austere: gray music for an uncertain voyage, perfectly illustrated in the album's monochromatic artwork. So when the faux-brass section suddenly kicks in just beyond the 7:00 mark of "Fickle Sun, Part One" the effect is all the more powerful by contrast.

It's esoteric stuff, but strangely compelling: the poetry of ideas expressed as sound...a goofy description, I admit, but not when listening to Eno. And Part Two of "The Fickle Sun" is in fact an actual poem, recited by actor Peter Serafinowicz (the zombie roommate in the movie "Shaun of the Dead") over a gentle Satie-like solo piano phrase. Which then leads directly into Part Three, "I'm Set Free": an old Velvet Underground song, beautifully rendered into one of Eno's best vocal performances since the 1970s.

A final coda ("Away", once again with echoes of "Another Green World") is only available on Japanese editions of the album...sadly, because it offers an ideal epilogue to an already indelible experience. The whole package is quintessential Eno: subtle yet engaging, calm to the point of immobility but still able to stir the gray matter like nobody's business.

Thanks to ProgLucky for the artist addition. and to Quinino for the last updates

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