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THE DOORS

Proto-Prog • United States


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The Doors picture
The Doors biography
Founded in LA, USA in 1965 - Disbanded in 1973 - Reformed in 2002 as Doors Of The 21st Century (later renamed)

THE DOORS is one of the most legendary Los Angeles-area bands. They were part of the adventurous and prolific USA West Coast music scene that emerged in the exciting second half of the Sixties. Their story starts when Jim MORRISON meets Ray MANZAREK on the beach of Venice in July 1965. They already know each other from the University of California at Los Angeles film academie (UCLA).

Jim (born December 8th, 1943); his father was a high-ranking naval officer, born in a family with a long history of career militarists. Jim turned into a bright and good looking young man but he suffered from a dysfunctional background: a 'militiary household', numerous removals of the Morrison family and a non-affective and very demanding attitude of his parents. This resulted in an emphasis on showing negative behaviour from an early age: rebellious, unpredictable and agressive, often making sick jokes and acting sociopathic towards his best friends to avoid deeper relationships ('fear of bonding'). But on the other hand he impressed his friends and teachers with his great knowledge about philosophy, history and psychology and his humour and creative ideas. In order to escape the pressure of his parents, Jim leaves the university and moves to LA where he joins the UCLA in 1964.

Raymond Daniel MANZAREK (February 12th, 1939 - May 20th, 2013) grew up in a working class family but he got the opportunity to study first piano and then economics. Unfortunately Ray doesn't finish that study and starts to work as junior-manager at a bank. This is only for three months because Ray decides to join the UCLA where he got in touch with fellow student Jim Morrison. During their meeting on that beach in Venice, Jim tells Ray that he writes lyrics. Jim is asked to sing a few lines, he quickly succeeds to make impression on Ray with a song that later turned out to be "Moonlight Drive". Then Ray invites Jim to join his band, the trio RICK AND THE RAVENS featuring his two brothers Rick and Jim. After some line-up changes the band members are Ray, Jim, drummer John Densmore and guitarist Robby Krieger.

John Paul DENSMORE (born December 1st, 1944) is a fanatic swimmer in his childhood but from his 10th he starts to learn piano and on his 12th he switches to drumming (timpanist). During this study his love for jazz music begins to develop.

Robert Al...
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THE DOORS discography


Ordered by release date | Showing ratings (top albums) | Help Progarchives.com to complete the discography and add albums

THE DOORS top albums (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

4.33 | 728 ratings
The Doors
1967
4.23 | 560 ratings
Strange Days
1967
3.60 | 361 ratings
Waiting for the Sun
1968
2.91 | 309 ratings
The Soft Parade
1969
3.36 | 339 ratings
Morrison Hotel
1970
4.01 | 517 ratings
L.A. Woman
1971
2.69 | 113 ratings
Other Voices
1971
2.34 | 100 ratings
Full Circle
1972
3.14 | 137 ratings
An American Prayer
1978

THE DOORS Live Albums (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

3.74 | 80 ratings
Absolutely Live
1970
3.32 | 50 ratings
Alive, She Cried
1983
3.80 | 63 ratings
In Concert
1991
3.31 | 13 ratings
Bright Midnight: Live In America
2001
3.33 | 3 ratings
Live in Hollywood: Highlights from the Aquarius Theatre Performances
2001
4.10 | 10 ratings
Live At The Aquarius Theatre: The First Performance
2001
4.11 | 9 ratings
Live At The Aquarius Theatre: The Second Performance
2001
4.00 | 5 ratings
Live in Hollywood: Highlights from Aquarius Theatre Performances
2002
3.00 | 4 ratings
Backstage and Dangerous: The Private Rehearsal
2002
5.00 | 1 ratings
Boot Yer Butt! - The Doors Bootlegs
2003
3.83 | 6 ratings
Live In Detroit
2004
3.00 | 4 ratings
Live in Philadelphia '70
2005
4.05 | 13 ratings
Live In Boston 1970
2007
2.67 | 9 ratings
Live at the Matrix '67
2008
4.38 | 8 ratings
Live in Pittsburgh 1970
2008
4.00 | 7 ratings
Live in New York
2009
4.33 | 9 ratings
Live In Vancouver 1970
2011
3.82 | 11 ratings
Live At The Bowl '68
2012
2.50 | 2 ratings
London Fog 1966
2016
0.00 | 0 ratings
Live at the Matrix
2017
0.00 | 0 ratings
Live At The Matrix Part 2: Let's Feed Ice Cream To The Rats, San Francisco, CA - March 7 & 10, 1967
2018

THE DOORS Videos (DVD, Blu-ray, VHS etc)

3.71 | 7 ratings
Dance On Fire
1985
4.63 | 15 ratings
Live At The Hollywood Bowl
1987
3.00 | 2 ratings
The Doors
1987
3.75 | 13 ratings
Live In Europe 1968
1988
2.55 | 6 ratings
No One Here Gets Out Alive - The Doors' Tribute to Jim Morrison
1990
3.04 | 4 ratings
The Doors Are Open
1991
3.60 | 5 ratings
The Soft Parade A Retrospective
1991
3.00 | 2 ratings
The Best of The Doors
1997
4.20 | 5 ratings
The Doors Collection: Collector's Edition
1999
3.91 | 4 ratings
The Doors 30 Years Commemorative Edition
1999
3.00 | 2 ratings
The Last American Interview
2000
3.00 | 4 ratings
VH-1 Storytellers: A Celebration
2001
3.12 | 13 ratings
Soundstage Performances
2002
3.80 | 5 ratings
The Doors of the 21st Century - L.A. Woman Live
2004
3.00 | 2 ratings
Videobiography
2007
3.67 | 3 ratings
Classic Albums: The Doors - The Doors
2008
2.33 | 3 ratings
Collector's Edition
2008
2.42 | 14 ratings
When You're Strange
2010
3.80 | 5 ratings
Mr. Mojo Risin': The Story of L.A. Woman
2012
4.35 | 11 ratings
Live At The Bowl '68
2012
1.00 | 1 ratings
R-Evolution
2013
2.50 | 2 ratings
Feast Of Friends
2014
3.05 | 2 ratings
Live at the Isle Wight Festival 1970
2018

THE DOORS Boxset & Compilations (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

3.68 | 19 ratings
13
1970
3.81 | 18 ratings
Weird Scenes Inside the Gold Mine
1972
2.72 | 10 ratings
The Best of the Doors
1973
2.26 | 8 ratings
Star Collection (Vol. 1)
1973
0.00 | 0 ratings
Star Collection (Vol. 2)
1974
0.00 | 0 ratings
Star Collection (Vol. I + II)
1977
4.21 | 55 ratings
The Best Of The Doors
1985
3.40 | 11 ratings
The Doors OST
1991
3.21 | 10 ratings
The Doors Box Set
1997
4.40 | 5 ratings
Essential Rarities (The Best of the '97 Box Set)
1999
3.00 | 2 ratings
Love Me Two Times
2002
4.02 | 5 ratings
Legacy: The Absolute Best
2003
3.58 | 12 ratings
Perception
2006
3.50 | 17 ratings
The Very Best Of
2007
4.00 | 3 ratings
When You're Strange (OST)
2010
4.50 | 4 ratings
A Collection (6CD)
2011
3.50 | 3 ratings
L.A. Woman: The Workshop Sessions
2012
1.00 | 1 ratings
Curated By Record Store Day
2013
3.86 | 2 ratings
Other Voices / Full Circle
2015
0.00 | 0 ratings
The Singles
2017

THE DOORS Official Singles, EPs, Fan Club & Promo (CD, EP/LP, MC, Digital Media Download)

2.40 | 6 ratings
The Doors (1965 demo)
1965
4.79 | 10 ratings
Break On Through
1967
4.86 | 9 ratings
Light My Fire
1967
3.80 | 5 ratings
Alabama Song (Whiskey Bar)
1967
4.33 | 6 ratings
People Are Strange
1967
4.33 | 6 ratings
Love Me Two Times
1967
4.14 | 7 ratings
The Unknown Soldier
1968
4.33 | 6 ratings
Light My Fire 5'' vinyl
1968
4.14 | 7 ratings
Hello I Love You Won't You Tell Me Your Name
1968
3.33 | 8 ratings
Touch Me
1968
4.20 | 5 ratings
Tell All the People
1969
3.27 | 7 ratings
Wishful Sinful
1969
4.00 | 5 ratings
Runnin' Blue
1969
4.00 | 5 ratings
Road House Blues
1970
4.00 | 5 ratings
You Make Me Real
1970
3.39 | 9 ratings
Love Her Madly
1971
2.79 | 10 ratings
Riders on the Storm
1971
3.09 | 4 ratings
Tightrope Ride
1971
4.40 | 5 ratings
Hello I Love You
1971
3.50 | 2 ratings
The Mosquito promo
1972
2.14 | 3 ratings
Get Up and Dance
1972
3.09 | 4 ratings
The Mosquito
1972
3.13 | 4 ratings
The Piano Bird
1972
3.25 | 4 ratings
Hello I Love You 2 x 7'' single
1979
3.25 | 4 ratings
People Are Strange
1981
4.00 | 3 ratings
Gloria
1983
2.30 | 10 ratings
Live at the Hollywood Bowl
1987
3.83 | 6 ratings
Break On Through
1991
4.25 | 4 ratings
Riders On The Storm
1991
4.00 | 6 ratings
Light My Fire
1991
3.33 | 3 ratings
The Ghost Song
1995

THE DOORS Reviews


Showing last 10 reviews only
 The Doors by DOORS, THE album cover Studio Album, 1967
4.33 | 728 ratings

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The Doors
The Doors Proto-Prog

Review by Progressive Enjoyer

4 stars The Doors. Such an influential group, especially in the psychedelic scene of the time, with Jim's heavy, deep, but smooth voice taking the lead on this one. The art is nothing special, although it does include the fondly remembered Doors Logo - which surprisingly was only used on on other cover. Also, when going through the album, one musn't forget that it came before "Sgt. Pepper's...", but it was nearing it's release, coming slightly before the groundbreaking masterpiece.

The opening side of the album has quite a few obvious singles, "Break on through..." just about managing to be a hit in the UK charts, itself having quite a groovy melody, and being a great way to open up the album. "Soul Kitchen" has a really memorable and enjoyable opening, and continues of from the groovy basslines of the opening track, and is arguably more suited for a single than the opening track, but alas, that would never come from it, and the lyrics are catchy, and interesting (somewhat, it's one of the lyrically weaker songs). "Crystal Ship" is a rather odd song, not really fitting in with the rest of the first side, with a more somber sound, which is accompanied by more somber lyrics, and as much as I feel that it's not fitting at this part of the album, it does work as a b-side to the no.1 hit "Light my fire". The next two are forgettable, the second being a cover.

"Light my fire". The Doors most well recognised song (alongside the later "Riders of the Storm"), and one of the best songs they'd ever make, with some of Ray Manzarek's best work in the album, and a bassline that's not quite on par with the rest of the album, but the other music makes up for that. The keyboard solo is absoloutely magnificient, making the album version far superior over the hit single version, lasting for multiple minutes, and in the later parts moving towards a guitar solo.

The second side has a few semi-interesting songs. One of these is "Take it as it Comes", but it's nowhere near the quality of the first side.

The last song is Morrison's masterpiece. The End truly shows the poetic abilities of Jim Morrison, in his ability to tell so many differnt things with so little - although it's not without it's fair amount of nonsense lyrics, especially at the end of the song, which has a despicable amount of curses.

Overall, "The Doors" suffered from the fate that many albums of the time did - a weak side two. But that's not to say that it wasn't still a great, and influential album, having traces in bands such as Jefferson Airiplane and Deep Purple.

But I must only give it a four, and with what would happen in May that year, it doesn't hold up in comparison.

 Morrison Hotel by DOORS, THE album cover Studio Album, 1970
3.36 | 339 ratings

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Morrison Hotel
The Doors Proto-Prog

Review by VianaProghead
Prog Reviewer

3 stars Review Nº 454

"Morrison Hotel" is the fifth studio album of The Doors and was released in 1970. It's sometimes known with the name of "Morrison Hotel/Hard Rock Cafe". It happens because "Hard Rock Cafe" is the title of the first side of the LP and the second side is titled "Morrison Hotel". "Morrison Hotel" was largely seen as a return to the original form for the band.

The cover photo was taken at the actual "Morrison Hotel", in Los Angeles. The band asked the owners if they could photograph the hotel, but as they declined, the band went inside when nobody was looking and took the photo. The rear cover features a photograph of the Hard Rock Café, also in Los Angeles, which no longer is open. Curiously, the founders of the famous Hard Rock Café world chain later used that name because they saw it on The Doors' album.

"Morrison Hotel" has eleven tracks. The first track "Roadhouse Blues" written by Jim Morrison, Robby Krieger, Ray Manzarek and John Densmore is a blues/rock song which appeared on the B side of "You Make Me Real", which was the first single released from this album. This song represents, for me, one of the best musical moments on the album. The second track "Waiting For The Sun" written by Jim Morrison is curiously a song with the same name of their third studio album. Sincerely, I don't know, if by unknown reasons, it should have been included on that album or not. Anyway it only appears on "Morrison Hotel" and I'm very glad with that because this is a great song. It's slightly a psychedelic song that changes from the quiet to more heavy musical passages, with an excellent musical work and a very melodic vocal performance. This song represents the highlight of the album and is one of the few songs with some progressive lines. The third track "You Make Me Real" written by Jim Morrison was, as I said before, the song chosen to be released as the first single of this album. Despite be a song with good piano and guitar works, it doesn't sounds very pleasant to my ears and it also sounds to me a bit outdated, almost a revival musical number. The fourth track "Peace Frog" written by Jim Morrison and Robby Krieger is a song that blends seamlessly into the next fifth track "Blue Sunday". Because they're two very short songs and, in a certain way, they were joined together, it was very common that some radio stations played both songs together too. "Peace Frog" is a song with good lyrics and good rhythm, nice guitar and good keyboard playing. The fifth track "Blue Sunday" written by Jim Morrison is a nice ballad with a very soft sound and where Jim Morrison's voice sounds delicate, subtle and calm. The sixth track "Ship Of Fools" written by Jim Morrison and Robby Krieger is a very vulgar song, not particularly good nor particularly bad. I think the main thing that saves the song it's the nice keyboard sound all over the song, which makes of it an enjoyable and nice song to hear. The seventh track "Land Ho!" written by Jim Morrison and Robby Krieger is another song nice and pleasant to hear with some creativity, fine musicianship and some good guitar parts. However and despite all I said before, we are in presence of another uninspired song with a low creativity level. The eighth track "The Spy" written by Jim Morrison is a song that has a blues feeling. It's a soft, calm, quiet and personal song with a good piano work. Personally, I don't like very much of this kind of songs and I also must confess that I'm not a great fan of the blues. Still, I must say this isn't a bad track and it's even a nice and pleasant song to hear. The ninth track "Queen Of The Highway" written by Jim Morrison and Robby Krieger is an anthem song of The Doors. That is believed the lyrics are about Jim Morrison's girlfriend Pamela Courson. This is a nice song with good lyrics and where the keyboards are the real king on it, providing a kind of a mysterious sound. The tenth track "Indian Summer" written by Jim Morrison and Robby Krieger is a very interesting and mysterious song with some strange oriental sound. It's a song with a very slow and nice delicate sound where Jim Morrison's voice sounds delicate, subtle and calm. It reminds me a bit "The End". The eleventh track "Maggie M'Gill" written by Jim Morrison, Robby Krieger, Ray Manzarek and John Densmore is, without any doubt, one of the best songs on the album. It's a song full of great guitar work and with some beautiful keyboard parts. This is a song that returns the album to a harder sound. It isn't a great song but closes the album in a good way.

Conclusion: After their more experimental and less conventional previous work "The Soft Parade", which wasn't very well received by critics and fans, the band went back to their more traditional roots. On this album, there is a slight steer toward the blues, which would be fully explored by the band on their next studio album "L.A.Woman". As I said before, when I reviewed "The Soft Parade", I'm not pretty sure if "The Soft Parade" is weaker than "Morrison Hotel". It's true that "Morrison Hotel" is more uniform and well balanced than "The Soft Parade" is. But it's also true that it hasn't practically any highlight, with the exception of "Waiting For The Sun". By the other hand, "The Soft Parade" has the title track, one of the best and most progressive tracks ever composed by The Doors. Anyway, be one or the other the weakest, "The Soft Parade" and "Morrison Hotel" are the two weakest studio albums of The Doors with Jim Morrison.

Prog is my Ferrari. Jem Godfrey (Frost*)

 Waiting for the Sun by DOORS, THE album cover Studio Album, 1968
3.60 | 361 ratings

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Waiting for the Sun
The Doors Proto-Prog

Review by VianaProghead
Prog Reviewer

4 stars Review Nº 426

"Waiting For The Sun" is the third studio album of The Doors and was released in 1968. This is an album with strong lyrics but that often has been criticized for have a softer sound. Much of the material on the album had been written around and before the formation of the group, most notably "Not To Touch The Earth", which was taken from the poem of Jim Morrison, "Celebration Of The Lizard". It was intended that the poem was written for this album and take up an entire album side, but in the end, the band only released it on their debut live album "Absolutely Live", in 1970.

"Waiting For The Sun" has eleven tracks. All songs were written by Jim Morrison, Robby Krieger, Ray Manzarek and John Densmore. The first track "Hello I Love You" was a song chosen by the band to be released as a single and was a big commercial success. Despite be considered one of the most pop songs by The Doors and be frequently criticized, this is, in my humble opinion, a great song, very catchy, and that opens brilliantly this album. The second track "Love Street" was originally a poem written by Jim Morrison about Rothdell Trail, a street in Laurel Canyon, California, where he lived with his girlfriend Pamela Courson and where they would sit on the balcony and watch the people walking. This is a very nice soft ballad with great piano and guitar arrangements and with a beautiful voice by Jim Morrison. The third track "Not To Touch The Earth" is a fragment taken from Jim Morrison's poem, "Celebration Of The Lizard", that although a recording of the complete poem was attempted at the sessions for the album, only this brief musical passage was deemed fit for this release. It returns to their classic psychedelic sound and represents one of the heaviest moments on the album. The fourth track "Summer's Almost Gone" is another good, quiet and soft ballad and represents one of the earliest songs composed by them. It's a very mellow, sensitive and sad song with the psychedelic sound so typical on the band in their earlier musical days. The fifth track "Wintertime Love" is a very unusual song for them. It's a waltz performed in a soft style. This is a very small song that despite represents one of the weakest songs on the album, I really think this is a good song and represents a beautiful musical moment too. This song reminds me The Stranglers. But it isn't surprising for me, because I always found many similarities between the keyboard style of Ray Manzarek and Dave Greenfield. The sixth track "The Unknown Soldier" was the first single taken from this album by The Doors. The song represents Jim Morrison's reaction to the Vietnam War and the way the conflict was depicted in the American's media at that time. It's a classic protest song against the war and where the band shows perfectly their personal feelings about it. The seventh track "Spanish Caravan" is, basically, a flamenco song with the beginning riffs taken from "Asturias (Leyenda)", a classical piece of music by the Spanish composer Isaac Albeniz. This always was one of my favourite songs of The Doors. The texture of the composition and arrangements are absolutely original and astonishing, and, in my humble opinion, we are in presence of a masterpiece. As I'm Portuguese, I must say this is the only song by The Doors with a reference to Portugal. The eighth track "My Wild Love" is the only song played on the album in a Cappella style. Jim Morrison's vocals are backed up by the band's members vocals, performing different sorts of sounds, with their mouths and clapping hands. It's, in reality, a very weird song, and it isn't, definitely, one of the highlights on the album. The ninth track "We Could Be So Good Together" was initially released as the B side of the single "The Unknown Soldier". The song was recorded during the recording sessions for "Strange Days", but only appeared on this album. This is another pop rock song, but this time we aren't in presence of a great song. The tenth track "Yes, The River Knows" is a soft acoustic ballad with nice piano and drum arrangements. However, in my opinion, it lacks to it some flame of creativity and, unfortunately, it represents, without any doubt, one of the weakest moments on the album. The eleventh track "Five To One" is the heaviest song on the album with Jim Morrison's vocals very energetic and with the distorted guitar sound by Robby Krieger. It's also a memorable song because of the lyrics. This is a good way to close the album, with one of the most powerful and heaviest songs that The Doors have ever made.

Conclusion: After the first two previous strong and intense psychedelic albums, the third studio album of The Doors, appeared softer and full of ballads, and as I wrote before, it has been criticized by many fans and critics due to its softer sound. However and despite not be as good as "The Doors" and "Strange Days" are, it still remains a great album, very well balanced and that maintain, in a certain way, the same musical formula of the two previous studio albums. Concluding, "Waiting For The Sun" is, in my humble opinion, one the best musical studio works from the band, and it remains as one of my favourite studio albums from them, after "The Doors", "Strange Days" and "L.A.Woman". It's a perfect partner to join with the two first albums of them. It's especially indicated for people who love their earlier works.

Prog is my Ferrari. Jem Godfrey (Frost*)

 The Soft Parade by DOORS, THE album cover Studio Album, 1969
2.91 | 309 ratings

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The Soft Parade
The Doors Proto-Prog

Review by VianaProghead
Prog Reviewer

3 stars Review Nº 421

"The Soft Parade" is the fourth studio album of The Doors and was released in 1969. It met some controversy among fans and critics due to the inclusion on this album of brass and string instrumental arrangements, as opposed to the more traditional sound of their earlier three previous studio albums. They also complained that it followed the same lyrical formula of their previous albums, and thus wasn't very innovative, and musically it had a sound too to much soft.

Another interesting and curious thing about "The Soft Parade", is that for the first time, all songs were credited to the individual members of the band. However, only Jim Morrison and Robby Krieger are credited on the album's sleeve.

"The Soft Parade" has nine tracks. The first track "Tell All The People" written by Robby Krieger was the third single taken from the album. It was released as an A side with "Easy Ride" as its B side. It's a soft ballad that sounds very mellow with full of brass arrangements. This is a good and pleasant song to hear. With this song we can clearly see that a change occurred on their style of music. It became more soft and pop. The second track "Touch Me" written by Robby Krieger was also released as a single. It's another notable song for the extensive use of brass and string instruments and also because the use of a saxophone solo by Curtis Amy. The orchestral arrangements work perfectly well and, in my humble opinion, they accent Jim Morrison's vocals. The third track "Shaman's Blues" written by Jim Morrison is also a good song, with good riffs and good vocals of Jim Morrison. It's a song clearly influenced by the blues but, unfortunately, it doesn't bring anything new. Definitely, it represents one of the Achilles' heels on the album. The fourth track "Do It" written by Jim Morrison and Robby Krieger was the only song written together. It was released as the B side of their single "Runnin' Blue" and it was also the last of the four singles released from this album. It's a good rock number that sounds nice and pleasant to hear, but like "Shaman's Blues" represents also one of the weakest musical moments on the album. The fifth track "Easy Ride" written by Jim Morrison was also one of the songs chosen to be released as a single. This time it was chosen to be the B side of their single "Tell All The People". It's a country and western song full of orchestration. Sincerely, this isn't one of my favourite music genres. This is, in my humble opinion, a very weak track, the weakest track on the all album. The sixth track "Wild Child" written by Jim Morrison was released as the B side of their single "Touch Me", preceding the release of the album in several months. This is a typical and classic The Doors' songs, a harder guitar driven song that sounds similar to many other great songs of them. It's a song with excellent musical arrangements, particularly on the guitars. This is one of my favourite songs on the album. The seventh track "Runnin' Blue" written by Robby Krieger was also a song chosen to be released as a single. Curiously, on this song Robby Krieger shares the vocal duties with Jim Morrison for the chorus, and this was one of the few songs where that happened, in their entire career. This is another country style song, with violin and the use of brass and string instruments. However and in my humble opinion, "Runnin' Blue" is fortunately a much better song than "Easy Ride" is. The eighth track "Wishful Sinful" written by Robby Krieger was another song taken from this album to be released as a single. The B side of the single, "Who Scared You?", is one of the few B side songs that never were released on any studio album of them. It's a very good and beautiful ballad, one of the best created by them, with fantastic orchestral arrangements. This song represents, without any doubt, one the highlights on the album. The ninth track is the title track "The Soft Parade". It was written by Jim Morrison. This is, without any doubt, the best and the only true progressive musical moment on the album. This song followed the good old tradition of the band, to close their albums with great epics, as had happened with "The End" on "The Doors" and "When The Music's Over" on "Strange Days". This song represents what they knew to make better. It's a great progressive music with great musical arrangements and strange lyrics and it has also an excellent and unforgettable vocal performance by Jim Morrison.

Conclusion: As I said before, "The Soft Parade" is in general considered as the weakest of all studio albums of The Doors. The great change in the production style didn't help the album's success, especially the addition of the brass and the string instrumental arrangements. So, "The Soft Parade" has been very criticized since it was released and it has even been considered as a sell out commercial album. Sincerely, I really don't think so. I really can't agree with most of the critics about this album. Personally, I can't see any kind of problem with the use of the brass and the string instruments and arrangements on the album. However, I completely agree with those who say that it's less good than their previous studio albums, especially their first two albums. Nevertheless, for me, it has a handful of good songs and quality enough to be considered still a good album. And I'm not pretty sure that "The Soft Parade" is the weakest album of The Doors. Sincerely, I'm not really very convinced that "The Soft Parade" is a weaker album than "Morrison Hotel".

Prog is my Ferrari. Jem Godfrey (Frost*)

 L.A. Woman by DOORS, THE album cover Studio Album, 1971
4.01 | 517 ratings

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L.A. Woman
The Doors Proto-Prog

Review by VianaProghead
Prog Reviewer

4 stars Review Nº 409

"L.A.Woman" is the sixth studio album of The Doors and was released in 1971. It was also the last album recorded with the original line up, before their lead singer and founder member Jim Morrison, died in July 1971, in Paris, France, while he was vacationing with his girlfriend, Pamela Courson. Unfortunately, it represents also the beginning of the end of one of the best and most important bands that contributed to the rise of the movement of the progressive rock music.

The album represents a change into their musical direction. It's less psychedelic than their previous albums and it's more oriented to the blues. It continued to integrate elements of blues into their music, a direction begun with their previous album, "Morrison Hotel". "L.A.Woman" is arguably the most blues/rock oriented album of the band's catalog.

"L.A.Woman" has ten tracks. The first track "The Changeling" written by Jim Morrison, Robby Krieger, Ray Manzarek and John Densmore is an obscure and strange song that opens perfectly well the album. It's a very good song with good guitars by Robby Krieger and the bass lines here are absolutely great. This song tells us that probably we are in the presence of a great album. The second track "Love Her Madly" written by Robby Krieger was the song chosen to be the lead single of the album, and that became one of the highest charting hits of The Doors. It's a good and interesting rock song with good lyrics, very good performances by all band's members, especially the guitar performance of Robby Krieger is really excellent. The third track "Been Down So Long" written by Jim Morrison, Robby Krieger, Ray Manzarek and John Densmore is a standard and very conventional blues song. Lyrically, the song uses themes of depression, liberation and sexuality. It's a good blues song but sincerely, it doesn't add anything new to the album, especially in terms of progressive rock music. The fourth track "Cars Hiss By My Window" by Jim Morrison, Robby Krieger, Ray Manzarek and John Densmore is another standard blues style song. As happens with "Been Down So Long" and "Crawling King Snake", they're noted as the standout tracks on "L.A.Woman", as the three blues songs on the album. Like "Been Down So Long" it's another good blues song but doesn't represents nothing more. The fifth track is the title track "L.A.Woman". It was written by Jim Morrison, Robby Krieger, Ray Manzarek and John Densmore. Here we are in the presence of an excellent song with a perfect combination of the traditional rock style with some jazzy elements. In my humble opinion, "L.A.Woman" represents the second best musical moment on the album. Due to its length and difficult vocal chord progression "L.A.Woman" is considered extremely difficult to sing live. The Doors only played it live entirely once, at their penult concert, in Dallas. The sixth track "L'America" written by Jim Morrison, Robby Krieger, Ray Manzarek and John Densmore is a very dark song which was originally composed for the soundtrack of the film "Zabriskie Point", but it never was used on it. This is an excellent track, very psychedelic that perfectly builds a perfect breathtaking and suffocating musical atmosphere. The seventh track "Hyacinth House" written by Jim Morrison, Robby Krieger, Ray Manzarek and John Densmore is a great ballad and represents for me the most beautiful track on the album. Here, Ray Manzarek and Robby Krieger's musical performances shine and the voice of Jim Morrison are deliciously delicate and beautiful. The eighth track "Crawling King Snake" written by John Lee Hooker is the only song on the album which wasn't made by the band. It represents the third song from the blues trilogy on the album. Like the other two blues songs, it's also a good song. The ninth track "The WASP (Texas Radio And The Big Beat)" written by Jim Morrison, Robby Krieger, Ray Manzarek and John Densmore is another very good song on the album, with good riffs, very good drumming and where Jim Morrison practically recites the lyrics. The tenth track "Riders On The Storm" written by Jim Morrison, Robby Krieger, Ray Manzarek and John Densmore represents, without any doubt, the great highlight on the album. This is a legendary track, which seems to be the last song recorded by The Doors, as well as Jim Morrison's last recorded song to be released. It seems that it have been played live only once, on The Doors last public performance with Jim Morrison, on the "L.A.Woman" tour at The Warehouse, in New Orleans, Louisiana, in 1970.

Conclusion: "L.A.Woman" is, without any doubt, a great album and represents one of the best studio works made by The Doors in their entire musical career. As I said before, it represents a clear change into their musical direction, from their earlier psychedelic musical period to a more blues/rock oriented style. Personally, I must confess that I'm not a great fan of blues and sincerely, I rather prefer their earlier psychedelic musical period. However, and as I said before, "L.A.Woman" is really a great album with great songs, especially the legendary track "Riders On The Storm", which is unquestionably a masterpiece. If it wasn't the existence of the three blues songs, I'm one of those who think that they're three outsider songs on the album, and I would probably have rated it with 5 stars. Still, this is a great farewell of Jim.

Prog is my Ferrari. Jem Godfrey (Frost*)

 Break On Through by DOORS, THE album cover Singles/EPs/Fan Club/Promo, 1967
4.79 | 10 ratings

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Break On Through
The Doors Proto-Prog

Review by Matti
Prog Reviewer

5 stars 20-Year Chronological Run-Through, pt. Five: 1967.

Now to the West Coast of the USA, where a new rock legend was born. The Doors, fronted by the enigmatic vocalist-lyricist Jim Morrison, debuted with the eponymous album (1967), which IMHO is one of the best rock albums of that year. Before the album came this single, in January '67. Both songs were included in the album, 'Break On Through' deservedly as the opening track.

Effectively grounded on a bossa nova rhythm pattern and featuring Ray Manzarek's skilful organ playing and Morrison's at-once mature power as a vocalist in full bloom, the song and its dynamic performance recorded in the autumn of '66 is a pure rock classic in every aspect. Energetic, edgy and yet poetically deep.

'End of the Night' is a relatively small scale, slow tempo song that beautifully captures the band's and its vocalist's ability to dive even deeper into the mystic, nocturnal atmospheres -- which were of course petfected in the marvelous long track 'The End'. On the surface, the piece is fairly simple and may appear as slightly monotoneous to some listeners, but to me it's among the group's most spellbinding songs.

A groundbreaking debut single deserving five stars!

 The Soft Parade by DOORS, THE album cover Studio Album, 1969
2.91 | 309 ratings

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The Soft Parade
The Doors Proto-Prog

Review by TCat
Forum & Site Admin Group Eclectic / Prog Metal / Heavy Prog Team

4 stars The Doors 4th album "The Soft Parade" came after an extensive tour, and with pressure from the record company to produce another album left the band members little time to compose new music. Their producer, in the meantime, wanted the band to try out a new sound, while pushing into a popular sound and style. Thus, The Soft Parade was born out of this. However, I don't believe it was a big failure, even though the albums longevity in sales wasn't quite as long as previous albums.

The "new sound" of The Doors would end up incorporating tracks with a lot of orchestral backing. It might have been a bit shocking at first to the masses of The Doors fans, but listening to it all of these years later, it doesn't seem as shocking as it did then. It almost seems like a natural progression. And, for being pressured into creating new songs, they ended up sounding pretty decent anyway.

Keyboardist Ray Manzarek and drummer John Densmore had already discussed bringing in some horns and strings, and the idea to do something different only allowed them to try it out. Besides, Densmore and Manzarek both had jazz backgrounds and welcomed the idea. Morrison, in the meantime, wasn't necessarily opposed to the idea, but his own songs didn't go in that direction, which ended up giving the album more of a variety.

"Tell All the People" and hit "Touch Me" were both written by Robby Krieger, and they start off the album with that upbeat and pop jazz sound, and it starts things off the right way. The next 4 tracks were penned by Morrison, and these see little or no orchestra or horns, but rely more on the rock, blues and psychedelic styles that Morrison felt were his stronger suit. On previous albums, the entire band had been credited for each song, but Morrison decided that he didn't want to be associated as having writing credits for "Tell All the People" because of the lyrics telling people to "get your guns", so mainly for this reason, it was decided to list the specific writing credits to the appropriate band member. As the album continues, "Runnin' Blue" and "Wishful Sinful" are both penned by Krieger, and the "new sound" is apparent again, however, with the former track, there is a bluegrass style chorus to it, which was definitely a surprise for fans especially with it also being the first time Krieger would sing on a Doors album, and the latter track has the string drenched arrangements that turn the song into a track that could have been written by Neil Diamond, and is probably my least favorite on the album.

The thing that does weaken the songs a bit on this album is not so much the inclusion of heavily orchestrated tracks, but because of so many shorter and lesser developed tracks. The spirit is there, for sure, but most of them are over before they have a chance to get into the listeners head. That is the case with all of them except for the title track, which is the one that originally finished this quick album off. It is another Morrison penned track. It is also the most progressive song on the album with several different meter and style changes throughout its 8 minute run time. It also ends up, along with "Touch Me", as being the most memorable things about the album, and the song that would keep the fans happy with the feeling that this new direction would probably not be permanent.

The 40th Anniversary Edition of the album continues on with 6 extra tracks. "Who Scared You" was written by Krieger, and was a non-album b-side for "Wishful Sinful". It is also another track utilizing the orchestra and horns, though it does have more of a blues inflection than the other Krieger tunes on this album. This is followed by two different versions of "Whiskey, Mystics and Men", a non-album track recorded in 1970 (Version 1) and overdubbed by the surviving members of the band in a different key (Version 2). The song is definitely a classic-sounding Morrison track, with a barroom feel and an accordion providing most of the instrumental backup. "Push Push" is a rare Doors jam that follows a Latin style drum beat with Manzarek doing most of the work on piano and the band singing "Push Push Push" in the background. The track is a bit too long without much of a change for over 6 minutes. Next is "Touch Me (Dialogue)" with is a short track and just has some banter by the band as they prepare to record a take of the named song, and then this is followed by "Touch Me (Take 3)", which is a nice alternative take on the popular song that still retains the horns but accents the harpsichord and strings more.

The 50th Anniversary Edition has 16 additional tracks, but only repeats "Who Scared You" from the 40th Anniversary Edition, plus it has all of the orchestral tracks in versions that are performed only by The Doors, some alternative versions of other songs, like "Roadhouse Blues" and "(You Need Meat) Don't Go No Further", both sung by Manzarek, a short track called "I Am Troubled", a different version of Morrison's preacher vocal from The Soft Parade track called "Seminary School", the full 60+ minute version of "Rock is Dead" and a track called "Chaos". This edition is probably more interesting to die-hard fans than anyone else. I find the 40th Anniversary Edition to be the better one as it adds to the album without adding badly done demos that weren't meant to be released.

So, overall, the album isn't as bad as some might make it out to be, but for an album by The Doors, most of the songs lack development, and that is the biggest drawback, and that is a pretty big one. The addition of orchestra and horns actually works well for the most part, and the title track is probably worth purchasing the entire album for. But there are better Doors albums, so it's one that you might want to check out after you have already made yourself familiar with some of their better albums. 3.5 stars rounded up to 4.

 L.A. Woman by DOORS, THE album cover Studio Album, 1971
4.01 | 517 ratings

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L.A. Woman
The Doors Proto-Prog

Review by patrickq
Prog Reviewer

2 stars As I see it, the Doors were trending downward when L.A. Woman was released in 1971, just months before the death of frontman Jim Morrison. It's true that there were some promising signs in the behavior of the mercurial Morrison during the recording sessions, but these were counterbalanced by an increasing number of indications that neither the band, nor perhaps music itself, was his raison d'être anymore. Plus, as demonstrated by the band's final two (Morrison-less) albums, and by the relative lack of post-Doors success experienced by the surviving members, Morrison's participation was essential.

Shortly after the L.A. Woman sessions began in November 1970, producer Paul A. Rothchild, who had been with the band since their first album, quit working with the group, partly, it's said, over Morrison's aversion to rehearsals, and partly because he disliked the group's artistic direction. Bruce Botnick was promoted from sound engineer to co- producer, but that choice must've been made with the realization that they'd be losing, but not replacing, a putative taskmaster and a decided quality-control agent.

Oddly (at least to me), the three strong songs here, 'Love Her Madly,' 'L.A. Woman,' and 'Riders on the Storm,' appear to have been the first rehearsed for the album. If Rothchild's oversight was in fact positively correlated with successful Doors material, that makes sense. But apparently it was precisely these songs which drove Rothchild out. At any rate, much of the remainder of L.A. Woman is offhanded bar-band blues, which may have been an attempt to keep it real, assuring critics and fans that their prior album, the pop-rejecting Morrison Hotel, was no fluke. On the title track, as well as many of the blues-based songs, Morrison affects a glottal vocal style which I have to assume is supposed to sound like a clichéd (i.e., black) blues or soul singer. It kind of works, for instance, on the James-Brown homage 'The Changeling,' but in other cases it sounds like Morrison just can't hit the notes. This is noticeable, for example, on the 'city of night' section of 'L.A. Woman.' But to be fair, he sounds in good voice when he's not imitating the style of others, on tracks like 'Love Her Madly,' 'L'America,' and 'Riders on the Storm.'

Speaking of 'Riders on the Storm:' while L.A. Woman sounds like the product of a band in decline, I have to acknowledge that the Doors close the album in a big way. Along with 'Break on Through' and 'Light My Fire' - - both from the Doors' 1967 debut album - - 'Riders on the Storm' is a true rock classic. And 'Love Her Madly' is another gem in the Doors headband.

I wouldn't recommend L.A. Woman to casual Doors fans unless we're talking about casual Doors fans who especially like blues-based rock - - and even then, I'd suggest the Allman Brothers or Cream first. But if neither that nor a Doors greatest-hits album is enough, L.A. Woman may be what you're looking for.

 The Best Of The Doors by DOORS, THE album cover Boxset/Compilation, 1985
4.21 | 55 ratings

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The Best Of The Doors
The Doors Proto-Prog

Review by patrickq
Prog Reviewer

4 stars As far as I know, this was the first Doors greatest-hits CD, and it's a significant one, with ten million certified sales in the US as of 2007. Since that time, it has been superseded several times as the go-to Doors compilation.

A-B comparisons of some of the songs here reveal that they're not quite the equals of more recent remastered versions, but I'm not sure I would've noticed otherwise; apparently the original Doors albums were recorded pretty well. One thing that I did notice after becoming more familiar with the group is that this collection is sequenced quite strangely: the songs are in semi-chronological order. The first three are from the group's first album, and the next three are from their second. But then it's back to the first, then the third, the fifth, back to the third - - you get the idea. All three songs from the last album represented here (L.A. Woman, also their last with singer Jim Morrison) are on the second CD, but the collection closes with a song from their debut. Since the nineteen songs here were released over a period of less than four and a half years, with no change in band membership, I suppose the departure from chronological sequencing isn't as noticeable as it might've been otherwise. But the Doors' sound did change over their somewhat brief career; for instance, their debut album has more of a live-in-the-studio feel. And L.A. Woman had a different producer - - and a different-sounding Morrison.

Like many Best-Ofs, The Best of the Doors draws heavily from a limited number of LPs. Prog Archives lists nine studio albums by the Doors, including six that made the US Top 10. About 47 of this album's 89 minutes are taken from the first two of these, The Doors and Strange Days, both from 1967. However, this works pretty well. I try not to criticize the song selection of compilation albums, and while my choices would've been a bit different, I probably would've also chosen heavily from their earlier songs. At any rate, their most notable songs are here. That includes most of their finest singles, but also their two longest - - and, in my opinion, most self-indulgent - - album tracks, which account for close to 23 minutes of the running time of The Best of the Doors. The lengths of these two, in comparison to the other tracks, is probably what precipitated the odd sequencing; there was really nothing else to do other than to place one at the end of each of the disks.

The Best of the Doors has been supplanted by several compilations. Judging by the track list, the single-disk The Future Starts Here: The Essential Doors Hits (2008) is just as good, even if it's ten minutes shorter. Nonetheless, there must be thousands of used copies of The Best of the Doors floating around for cheap. My suggestion to any fan of 'proto-prog' or of rock music in general: unless you already have a comprehensive Doors collection, grab a copy of this one.

 Waiting for the Sun by DOORS, THE album cover Studio Album, 1968
3.60 | 361 ratings

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Waiting for the Sun
The Doors Proto-Prog

Review by patrickq
Prog Reviewer

3 stars I've never understood why "Hello I Love You" is disliked by a fair number of fans of the Doors. Although I've always enjoyed "Touch Me" from the band's 1969 album The Soft Parade, I can see how its contemporary pop sound could have turned off longtime fans. But "Hello I Love You"? I suppose it has a pop form, but so did at least a handful of prior Doors songs - - "People Are Strange" comes to mind.

Anyway, I picked up a copy of Waiting for the Sun a few years ago. It was a brand new, remastered CD for $4.99 or so. I played it once and decided it was OK but nothing special. For some reason I gave it a spin recently and upon further reconsideration, I was surprised at how good it was.

Although the Doors' debut album is often considered their best, Waiting for the Sun is just as good, and is an improvement over Strange Days, their sophomore effort. There's no "Break on Through" or "Light My Fire" here, but "Hello, I Love You," "The Unknown Soldier," and "Five to One" rank among next echelon of the Doors' best songs, and they're nicely interleaved with some solid cuts like "Spanish Caravan," "Love Street" and "Not to Touch the Earth." Three stars.

Thanks to erik neuteboom for the artist addition. and to Quinino for the last updates

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