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THE DOORS

Proto-Prog • United States


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The Doors biography
Founded in LA, USA in 1965 - Disbanded in 1973 - Reformed in 2002 as Doors Of The 21st Century (later renamed)

THE DOORS is one of the most legendary Los Angeles-area bands. They were part of the adventurous and prolific USA West Coast music scene that emerged in the exciting second half of the Sixties. Their story starts when Jim MORRISON meets Ray MANZAREK on the beach of Venice in July 1965. They already know each other from the University of California at Los Angeles film academie (UCLA).

Jim (born December 8th, 1943); his father was a high-ranking naval officer, born in a family with a long history of career militarists. Jim turned into a bright and good looking young man but he suffered from a dysfunctional background: a 'militiary household', numerous removals of the Morrison family and a non-affective and very demanding attitude of his parents. This resulted in an emphasis on showing negative behaviour from an early age: rebellious, unpredictable and agressive, often making sick jokes and acting sociopathic towards his best friends to avoid deeper relationships ('fear of bonding'). But on the other hand he impressed his friends and teachers with his great knowledge about philosophy, history and psychology and his humour and creative ideas. In order to escape the pressure of his parents, Jim leaves the university and moves to LA where he joins the UCLA in 1964.

Raymond Daniel MANZAREK (February 12th, 1939 - May 20th, 2013) grew up in a working class family but he got the opportunity to study first piano and then economics. Unfortunately Ray doesn't finish that study and starts to work as junior-manager at a bank. This is only for three months because Ray decides to join the UCLA where he got in touch with fellow student Jim Morrison. During their meeting on that beach in Venice, Jim tells Ray that he writes lyrics. Jim is asked to sing a few lines, he quickly succeeds to make impression on Ray with a song that later turned out to be "Moonlight Drive". Then Ray invites Jim to join his band, the trio RICK AND THE RAVENS featuring his two brothers Rick and Jim. After some line-up changes the band members are Ray, Jim, drummer John Densmore and guitarist Robby Krieger.

John Paul DENSMORE (born December 1st, 1944) is a fanatic swimmer in his childhood but from his 10th he starts to learn piano and on his 12th he switches to drumming (timpanist). During this study his love for jazz music begins to develop.

Robert Al...
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THE DOORS discography


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THE DOORS top albums (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

4.33 | 787 ratings
The Doors
1967
4.25 | 608 ratings
Strange Days
1967
3.62 | 404 ratings
Waiting for the Sun
1968
2.96 | 350 ratings
The Soft Parade
1969
3.37 | 379 ratings
Morrison Hotel
1970
4.02 | 569 ratings
L.A. Woman
1971
2.71 | 124 ratings
Other Voices
1971
2.36 | 111 ratings
Full Circle
1972
3.14 | 150 ratings
An American Prayer
1978

THE DOORS Live Albums (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

3.75 | 93 ratings
Absolutely Live
1970
3.33 | 52 ratings
Alive, She Cried
1983
3.83 | 69 ratings
In Concert
1991
3.28 | 13 ratings
Bright Midnight: Live In America
2001
3.75 | 4 ratings
Live in Hollywood: Highlights from the Aquarius Theatre Performances
2001
4.00 | 10 ratings
Live At The Aquarius Theatre: The First Performance
2001
4.00 | 9 ratings
Live At The Aquarius Theatre: The Second Performance
2001
4.00 | 5 ratings
Live in Hollywood: Highlights from Aquarius Theatre Performances
2002
3.40 | 5 ratings
Backstage and Dangerous: The Private Rehearsal
2002
3.00 | 2 ratings
Boot Yer Butt! - The Doors Bootlegs
2003
3.75 | 8 ratings
Live In Detroit
2004
2.67 | 6 ratings
Live in Philadelphia '70
2005
3.96 | 15 ratings
Live In Boston 1970
2007
2.91 | 11 ratings
Live at the Matrix '67
2008
4.33 | 9 ratings
Live in Pittsburgh 1970
2008
3.71 | 7 ratings
Live in New York
2009
3.90 | 10 ratings
Live In Vancouver 1970
2011
3.54 | 13 ratings
Live At The Bowl '68
2012
3.00 | 4 ratings
London Fog 1966
2016
5.00 | 1 ratings
Live at the Matrix
2017
5.00 | 1 ratings
Live At The Matrix Part 2: Let's Feed Ice Cream To The Rats, San Francisco, CA - March 7 & 10, 1967
2018
0.00 | 0 ratings
Live At The Matrix 1967: The Original Masters
2023

THE DOORS Videos (DVD, Blu-ray, VHS etc)

3.86 | 10 ratings
Dance On Fire
1985
4.74 | 19 ratings
Live At The Hollywood Bowl
1987
2.33 | 3 ratings
The Doors
1987
3.73 | 14 ratings
Live In Europe 1968
1988
2.51 | 7 ratings
No One Here Gets Out Alive - The Doors' Tribute to Jim Morrison
1990
2.96 | 5 ratings
The Doors Are Open
1991
3.81 | 8 ratings
The Soft Parade A Retrospective
1991
2.33 | 3 ratings
The Best of The Doors
1997
4.17 | 6 ratings
The Doors Collection: Collector's Edition
1999
3.88 | 6 ratings
The Doors 30 Years Commemorative Edition
1999
2.33 | 3 ratings
The Last American Interview
2000
3.00 | 5 ratings
VH-1 Storytellers: A Celebration
2001
3.15 | 14 ratings
Soundstage Performances
2002
3.33 | 6 ratings
The Doors of the 21st Century - L.A. Woman Live
2004
2.33 | 3 ratings
Videobiography
2007
3.50 | 4 ratings
Classic Albums: The Doors - The Doors
2008
2.00 | 4 ratings
Collector's Edition
2008
2.47 | 17 ratings
When You're Strange
2010
3.67 | 6 ratings
Mr. Mojo Risin': The Story of L.A. Woman
2012
4.33 | 13 ratings
Live At The Bowl '68
2012
3.00 | 2 ratings
R-Evolution
2013
2.00 | 3 ratings
Feast Of Friends
2014
3.14 | 3 ratings
Live at the Isle Wight Festival 1970
2018

THE DOORS Boxset & Compilations (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

3.69 | 20 ratings
13
1970
3.82 | 20 ratings
Weird Scenes Inside the Gold Mine
1972
2.68 | 12 ratings
The Best of the Doors
1973
2.16 | 10 ratings
Star Collection (Vol. 1)
1973
2.90 | 2 ratings
Star Collection (Vol. 2)
1974
3.91 | 3 ratings
Star Collection (Vol. I + II)
1977
4.25 | 60 ratings
The Best of The Doors
1985
3.32 | 12 ratings
The Doors OST
1991
3.28 | 13 ratings
The Doors Box Set
1997
3.30 | 8 ratings
Essential Rarities (The Best of the '97 Box Set)
1999
2.91 | 4 ratings
Love Me Two Times
2002
4.00 | 6 ratings
Legacy: The Absolute Best
2003
3.55 | 13 ratings
Perception
2006
3.27 | 21 ratings
The Very Best of The Doors
2007
3.25 | 4 ratings
When You're Strange (OST)
2010
4.49 | 9 ratings
A Collection (6CD)
2011
3.33 | 3 ratings
L.A. Woman: The Workshop Sessions
2012
2.00 | 2 ratings
Curated By Record Store Day
2013
3.91 | 3 ratings
Other Voices / Full Circle
2015
4.50 | 2 ratings
The Singles
2017
0.00 | 0 ratings
L.A. Woman Sessions
2022
0.00 | 0 ratings
Paris Blues
2022

THE DOORS Official Singles, EPs, Fan Club & Promo (CD, EP/LP, MC, Digital Media Download)

2.38 | 7 ratings
The Doors (1965 demo)
1965
4.74 | 12 ratings
Break On Through
1967
4.77 | 11 ratings
Light My Fire
1967
3.33 | 6 ratings
Alabama Song (Whiskey Bar)
1967
4.25 | 8 ratings
People Are Strange
1967
4.25 | 8 ratings
Love Me Two Times
1967
3.88 | 8 ratings
The Unknown Soldier
1968
4.14 | 7 ratings
Light My Fire 5'' vinyl
1968
3.88 | 8 ratings
Hello I Love You Won't You Tell Me Your Name
1968
3.29 | 9 ratings
Touch Me
1968
3.83 | 6 ratings
Tell All the People
1969
3.26 | 8 ratings
Wishful Sinful
1969
3.50 | 6 ratings
Runnin' Blue
1969
4.14 | 7 ratings
Road House Blues
1970
3.67 | 6 ratings
You Make Me Real
1970
3.33 | 11 ratings
Love Her Madly
1971
3.00 | 13 ratings
Riders on the Storm
1971
3.17 | 5 ratings
Tightrope Ride
1971
4.14 | 7 ratings
Hello I Love You
1971
4.00 | 3 ratings
The Mosquito promo
1972
2.26 | 4 ratings
Get Up and Dance
1972
3.17 | 5 ratings
The Mosquito
1972
3.21 | 5 ratings
The Piano Bird
1972
3.20 | 5 ratings
Hello I Love You 2 x 7'' single
1979
3.20 | 5 ratings
People Are Strange
1981
3.75 | 4 ratings
Gloria
1983
2.33 | 11 ratings
Live at the Hollywood Bowl
1987
3.43 | 7 ratings
Break On Through
1991
4.00 | 5 ratings
Riders On The Storm
1991
3.88 | 7 ratings
Light My Fire
1991
4.00 | 5 ratings
The Ghost Song
1995
4.00 | 6 ratings
Paris Blues
2022

THE DOORS Reviews


Showing last 10 reviews only
 The Soft Parade A Retrospective by DOORS, THE album cover DVD/Video, 1991
3.81 | 8 ratings

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The Soft Parade A Retrospective
The Doors Proto-Prog

Review by VianaProghead
Prog Reviewer

4 stars Review Nș 694

"The Soft Parade A Retrospective" is a DVD of The Doors released in 1991. It was also released and is still available now in the DVD format on "The Doors ? 30 Years Commemorative Edition" and on the Blue-ray disc format, which was released in 1999. That commemorative edition was released with two other live DVD's from the group, "Dance On Fire" that was originally released in 1985 and a short version of "Live At The Hollywood Bowl" originally released in 1987.

Directed by The Doors keyboardist Ray Manzarek, "The Soft Parade A Retrospective" features a mix of performance, rehearsal and beyond the scenes footage, as well as some historic interviews with The Doors band's members, Jim Morrison, Robby Krieger, John Densmore and Ray Manzarek himself. Despite being also an excellent DVD, this is probably the least interesting DVD of the all three, because probably there wasn't much more good footage left to be presented. The greatest weaknesses of "The Soft Parade A Retrospective" is probably because that Ray was forced to rely on footage of The Doors late parts of their musical career, when the bearded bloated Jim Morrison looked very little with the elegant rock'n'roll star in his leather pants who seduced all the audiences, especially the female auditions.

"The Soft Parade A Retrospective" has only seven tracks. The first track "The Changeling" was originally released on "L.A. Woman" in 1971. This version is a short film by The Doors in 1991, (The Doors Archives 67-68). The second track "Wishful Sinful" was originally released on "The Soft Parade" in 1969. This version is from the PBS TV Show Critique on 28 April 1969, (PBS and Private Archives). The third track "Wild Child" was originally released on "The Soft Parade". This version is from a recording studio session in 1968, (newly discovered Cinema Verité of the recording session). The fourth track "Build Me A Woman" was never released on any of the studio album of The Doors. It was originally released on "Absolutely Live" in 1970. This version is from the PBS TV Show Critique on 28 April 1969, (PBS and Private Archives). The fifth track "The Unknown Soldier" was originally released on "Waiting For The Sun" in 1968. This version is an Elektra promo clip released in March 1968, 5 July 1968 and 6 and 8 September 1968, (A dazzling new edit all existing performances). The sixth track "The Soft Parade" was originally released on "The Soft Parade". This version is from the PBS TV Show Critique on 28 April 1969, (PBS and Private Archives). The seventh track "Hello I Love You" was originally released on "Waiting For The Sun". This version is taken from a Frankfurt TV Show released in 13 September 1968, (The Doors Archives, Europe). This is the track that plays over the DVD closing credits.

This historic music video features The Doors as a mature band showing both their passionate rock'n'roll and their dark, and often less known work. It shows their true talent in the studio for coming up with the songs on the spot as well as lives. Additional material is drawn from The Doors' private archives. This video is a well assembled finale. It's an entertaining and rich ensemble of The Doors footage showing the wild side of Jim Morrison and how epic and crazy a The Doors concert footage can seems. As for the television appearance that is the highlight. This is very informative and interesting. It's interesting to see Jim Morrison giving his thoughts on music and poetry. Morrison is especially captivating while singing. "The Soft Parade A Retrospective" is a great tape for The Doors fans and rock enthusiasts.

"The Soft Parade A Retrospective" has also two bonus tracks. The first "Break On Through (To The Other Side)" was originally released on "The Doors". This version is from the live performance of The Doors at the Isle of Wight Festival in 1970. The second bonus track "The Ghost Song" was originally released on "An American Prayer". This version is made with images taken from a studio performance of this song after the dead of Jim Morrison as homage to him.

Conclusion: "The Soft Parade A Retrospective" is another excellent DVD of The Doors. It brings to us one of The Doors calmer and more laid back performances where we can clearly see sadness and devastation in Jim Morrison. We sense that he is suffering intensely in inside, and it's pretty obvious that on some level of his awareness he had realized that a good deal of his immense potential had gone down the drain as a result of alcoholism, drugs and fame, which somehow provoked a certain decadence. Probably he clearly knows that the 60's dream of liberation and freedom had completely failed, leaving him to live in a certain emptiness. Concluding, despite "The Soft Parade A Retrospective" be a very short DVD it represents a very important document of the last career of The Doors with Jim Morrison. This is an essential document for all fans of them, a nice look of thirty years after the legendary front man Jim Morrison's death.

Prog is my Ferrari. Jem Godfrey (Frost*)

 Live At The Hollywood Bowl by DOORS, THE album cover DVD/Video, 1987
4.74 | 19 ratings

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Live At The Hollywood Bowl
The Doors Proto-Prog

Review by VianaProghead
Prog Reviewer

5 stars Review Nș 690

"Live At The Hollywood Bowl" is a DVD of The Doors and that was released in 1987. It was recorded on 5 July 1968 but was only released for the first time in 1987. From what I know, five versions of this live show were released. There are two CD versions and two DVD versions. In 1987 it was released a CD version with only seven tracks and it became The Doors shortest official release, with only about twenty-two minutes long. The 1987/2000 DVD version has thirteen tracks and has about sixty-five minutes long. This version of the video of the concert is still available, now in the DVD format on "The Doors ? 30 Years Commemorative Edition" and on the Blue-ray disc format, which was released in 1999. That commemorative edition was released with two new live DVD's from the group, "Dance On Fire" that was originally released in 1985 and "The Soft Parade A Retrospective" that was originally released in 1991. In 2012 the full version of this live concert was released in CD, LP and DVD formats and it has the length of about seventy-one minutes long.

The version I'm going to review is the DVD version released in 1987. So and as I wrote before, this DVD version of "Live At The Hollywood Bowl" has thirteen tracks. The first track "When The Music's Over" was released on "Strange Days". The second track "Alabama Song (Whisky Bar)" was released on "The Doors". Originally this wasn't a song composed by The Doors but a Bertolt Brech and Kurt Weill song. The third track "Back Door Man" was released on "The Doors". Originally this wasn't also a song composed by The Doors but a Willie Dixon's song. The fourth track "Five To One" was released on "Waiting For The Sun". The fifth track "Moonlight Drive" was released on "Strange Days". The sixth track "Horse Latitudes" was released on "Strange Days". The seventh track "A Little Game" and the eighth track "The Hill Dwellers" are two small extracts taken from their piece "The Celebration Of The Lizard". "The Celebration Of The Lizard" is an epic piece written by Jim Morrison and composed as a series of poems, which includes several sections, spoken verses and passages of allegorical storytelling. The entire piece was intended to be released as one full side of one of the band's studio albums. Despite the group attempt to record the full piece for several times, they abandoned the idea because they were always dissatisfied with the final result. A complete performance of "The Celebration Of The Lizard" can be heard on their live album "Absolutely Alive". The first entirely recorded studio version was released on their compilation "Legacy: The Absolute Best". The ninth track "Spanish Caravan" was released on "Waiting For The Sun". The tenth track "Wake Up" is a small extract taken from "The Celebration Of The Lizard". The eleventh track "Light My Fire" was released on "The Doors". This is an edited extended version. The twelfth track "The Unknown Soldier" was released on "Waiting For The Sun". The thirteenth track "The End" was released on "The Doors".

The band is in a great musical shape despite Jim remains very staid, rarely moving and dancing around in his famous Indians' dance. Even today the music still remains powerful and intense. If you fancy a look at when bands were real bands then this DVD is certainly for you. This DVD delivers a pleasant concert experience. The audio is well handled and clean. Basically this is a fine live recording with no nasty clicks or hisses. The sound is really perfect. The music sounds as full of life as, presumably, it did back then. The entire concert was recorded using several cameras and is one of only two professionally recorded live performances of the band in colour. The picture on this DVD is a bit dark, due to the conditions it was filmed and it's a bit blurry and grainy. This is due that this is a 32 year old live recording and obviously you have all the technical problems of actually filming in such a dark place and the restrictions on what you can film. However, it's fairly free from dust and scratches but it shows its age especially in the grain department.

Conclusion: "Live At The Hollywood Bowl" is a great DVD. Despite this live version being an incomplete version of the entire concert, it documents a great live performance from The Doors. I expect very soon put my hands on the full concert brought to us on the DVD "Live At The Bowl' 68". Returning to this DVD, it has some incredible great musical moments. To me, the highlights of this DVD are "When The Music's Over", "Light My Fire" and of course "The End". It's strange to hear "When The Music's Over" as the opener and not the grand finale of the show. However, when they have "The End" to perform live, it seems to be normal and logical to finish the live show with "The End". Finally, the live performance of "Light My Fire" became absolutely unforgettable. The entire band is great and Ray Manzarek shows why he always was the successes' key of The Doors' sound. Despite some low quality image, it deserves to be bought.

Prog is my Ferrari. Jem Godfrey (Frost*)

 Dance On Fire by DOORS, THE album cover DVD/Video, 1985
3.86 | 10 ratings

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Dance On Fire
The Doors Proto-Prog

Review by VianaProghead
Prog Reviewer

4 stars Review Nș 660

"Dance On Fire" is a DVD of The Doors that was released in 1985. It was also released in the DVD format on "The Doors ? 30 Years Commemorative Edition" and on the Blue-ray disc format, which was released in 1999. That commemorative edition was also released with two other live DVD's from the group, a short version of "Live At The Hollywood Bowl" that was originally released in 1987 and "The Soft Parade A Retrospective" that was originally released in 1991.

"Dance On Fire" has sixteen tracks. The first track "Break On Through (To The Other Side)" was originally released on their eponymous debut studio album "The Doors", from 1967. The version on this DVD was taken from the original Elektra Promo Clip in November 1966. The second track "People Are Strange" was originally released on their second studio album "Strange Days", also from 1967. The version on this DVD was also taken from the original Elektra Promo Clip in September 1967. The third track "Light My Fire" was originally released on "The Doors". The version on this DVD was taken from the ED Sullivan Show on 17 September 1967. The fourth track "Wild Child" was originally released on their fourth studio album "The Soft Parade", from 1969. The version on this DVD was taken from a recording studio session at Elektra in October 1968. The fifth track "L.A. Woman" was originally released on their sixth studio album "L.A. Woman", from 1971. The version on this DVD is a new short film made by Ray Manzareck, in 1985. The sixth track "The Unknown Soldier" was originally released on their third studio album "Waiting For The Sun", from 1968. The version on this DVD was also taken from another original Elektra Promo Clip in March 1968. It was banned since 1968. The seventh track "Roadhouse Blues" was originally released on their fifth studio album "Morrison Hotel", from 1970. The version on this DVD has excerpts from "Feast Of Friends", the unreleased concert documentary originally filmed during the American tour made in 1968. The eighth track "The Wasp (Texas Radio And The Big Beat)" was originally released on "L.A. Woman". The version on this DVD was taken from a film made for the Danish Television on 18 September 1968. The ninth track "Love Me Two Times" was originally released on "Strange Days". The version on this DVD was taken from the same performance as the previous one. The tenth track "Touch Me" was originally released on "The Soft Parade". The version on this DVD was taken from a film made on "The Smothers Brothers Comedy Hour" on 6 December 1968. The eleventh track "Horse Latitudes" and the twelfth track "Moonlight Drive" were originally released on "Strange Days". The versions on this DVD were taken from a film of a live show made on "Jonathan Winters Show" on 4 December 1967. The thirteenth track "The End" was originally released on "The Doors". The version on this DVD is an excerpt of the performance made on the live concert filmed at The Hollywood Bowl on 5 July 1968. The fourteenth track "Crystal Ship" was also originally released on "The Doors". The version on this DVD was taken from a show made on the American Bandstand on 7 July 1967. The fifteenth track "Adagio" was originally a piece composed by Tommasso Albinoni. The Doors arranged the original piece and made their own version. This new version was recorded during "Waiting For The Sun" and played while home movies by The Doors are shown. The sixteenth track "Riders On The Storm" was originally released on "L.A. Woman". This is the track that plays over on the DVD closing credits.

On this DVD, The Doors are captured during their glorious heyday. "Dance On Fire" is a collection of live performances, promotional clips and rare behind-the-scenes film footage. No one could say The Doors were boring. Morrison himself was a complete mystery that became one of the most charismatic artists ever, especially due to his brief life. "Dance On Fire" contains fourteen songs drawn from television and concert appearances including "Light My Fire", "Touch Me", "Crystal Ship", "People Are Strange", "Break On Through" and "Riders On The Storm". It also has a riotous version of "Roadhouse Blues" from The Doors' 1968 summer concert tour of America and an original non-performance segment of "LA Woman" directed by Ray Manzarek. "Dance On Fire" has received widespread critical acclaim of fans and critics.

Conclusion: "Dance On Fire" is an excellent DVD of The Doors that covers all the group's musical discography when Jim Morrison was a band's member. It represents a very good and interesting musical document of one of the most important and charismatic rock bands that ever existed. This is undeniably one of the best collections from the group that contains some unique concert shots, immortal images of Morrison and his legendary band. There are also some very interesting music videos. Concluding, "Dance On Fire" is a good collection of great The Doors musical material and images. This is a must have for anyone who is interested in this style of music, especially for their hardest fans.

Prog is my Ferrari. Jem Godfrey (Frost*)

 The Soft Parade by DOORS, THE album cover Studio Album, 1969
2.96 | 350 ratings

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The Soft Parade
The Doors Proto-Prog

Review by theCoagulater

4 stars This is definitely the least revered Morrison-era Doors album. I would say I could see the reason for that, but I don't, so I don't see the reason for that. Throughout the entire thing, they're trying a generally more poppy sound. It's the first Doors album to have bass on all tracks, there's a lot of horns and such, and... well, the thing of it is, it that, uhh... there's the lemon stuff. And then you got Mac who's a rat, and Dee's body brace, and uh... and that's the thing of it, and... it's good.

Tell All The People triumphantly starts off the album with a tune not unlike what closed their previous album, Five To One. This one is again, a rallying cry. What separates this one from Five To One though is that it's directed at everyone for a better future, "You tell them they don't have to run, we're gonna pick up everyone." Five To One was directed at the youth for taking back the world the past generation destroyed "The old get old and the young get stronger. May take a week and it may take longer. They got the guns but we got the numbers. Gonna win, yeah we're takin' over." The distinction between these two songs that gives Tell All The People its power and triumphantly is the horns featured here. It sounds like they're introducing the (lizard) king, someone we can trust to put everything in its place, someone who can bury all our troubles in the sand, someone who can lead us "across the sea where milky babies seem to be." This song highlights the idea of who Jim Morrison was, someone who will expose and break the bonds of society. That might be stretching it, but you get my point, this song shows a perfect example of who he represented.

Touch Me uses the freer and poppier atmosphere of the album to zoom in and exaggerate the romantic aspect of the lyrics. The strings also do an amazing job of adding to the overall mood here. I wouldn't call it their best love song, I feel like the lyrics aren't as tight as Hello, I Love You or Wintertime Love, but it's an incredible song with all the other parts working amazingly together. And to be fair I like cute silly love songs more than this classic idea of romanticism. But that's just me, if I were the other way around this would probably be up there for one of my favorite love songs.

Shaman's Blues is a mellow, sort of damp tune. I think is about a dude down on his luck, sorta insane, man talking to someone who's either rich or in a high place politically. He's telling them that they could be doing a lot more about helping people like him. Lines like "There will never be another one who can do the things you do" tell us he's pressuring them to get something done. A lot of lines like "Did you stop it to consider how it will feel? Cold, grinding grizzly bear jaws hot on your heels." tell us either he's telling them that they haven't thought about what it's like actually living in these conditions, or that they should think about what hell is like before they go there for not helping more. There are a whole bunch more lines I could quote and how they relate to what I think the song is about, but I ain't an expert in poetry, so it's kind of redundant. Tell me if you think it's something else, I would want to hear other interpretations of the song, 'cause it's a very interesting piece. Or maybe you just want to tell me what a [%*!#]ing idiot you think I am for interpreting it this way, that's valid as well.

Do It marks where the album goes into the more poppy regions. It's another piece about the generation divide, telling older people to listen to younger people "the child" 'cause it's their world your rising them in. It's a bop, not too complicated, at least I think not. Maybe it's another case of me being a bumbling idiot, tell me about it.

Easy Ride is another one I don't get, it's very comforting, I like the sound of it a lot. The lyrics go over my head. Maybe Jim's just a confident driver and wants to tell us about it, which is cool I guess, good on him, being a good driver is a good skill to have.

Wild Child is (I think) a song about Jim's ideal vision for the future. That everybody is as upfront and forward-looking as this wild child. One thing that gets me about this one is that I DON'T remember when we were in Africa, and that's sorta taking me out of this. He doesn't at least talk about what the trip was like to jog my memory, kinda inconsiderate, but he's also like sorta dead, so there's no point in complaining now.

Runnin' Blue is an extremely fun song. Robby's Dylan impression is awesome, and it's super refreshing hearing him sing. This whole song is hard on the fun pop sound and it turns out great. The fiddle at the end is also pretty cool 'cause it (in one way or another) gets you in the mood for the next track, which has this sort of deeper sound the fiddle portrays. I wish they explored this whole sound more, as good as this song is I feel as if there's a lot of untapped potentials here.

Wishful Sinful is a perfect midway in-between the poppy sound of the last couple of tracks with the rougher and psychedelic sound of the title track. It follows in the lyrical footstep of Touch Me, with these loving, sexual lyrics. This again isn't my thing, but the strings and overall musicianship of the track make it a nice experience regardless. What it does best of all is buffer the first three-quarters of the album with the final track, "The Soft Parade", which is another one of The Doors' long closing tracks, and it very much needed a buffer considering the sound of this album.

The Soft Parade is the closing track and center of the album, it's what a lot of people listen to this album for. And for good reason, it's great. Following suit with their other epics the lyrics are really difficult at first. But if you try hard and never give up you'll get there, I believe in you champ. I think the track is about all of what you do to distance yourself from death. Doesn't matter if you do it via religion, candy, or being nice to your neighbor(?). This is helped by the sonic back-and-forth that this track does. The beginning is the most honest, calling out any bull[&*!#] that tries to convince you there's warmth in life separate from the cold and harshness of death. It's saying that you can't make whatever higher power there is to give you enteral life or a sufficient afterlife. The Next part has a bit of a less honest sound, but is still very honest in content, asking for warmth to hide from the ever marching presents of death. The next part is that warmth, candy, being nice to your neighbor, community, and such. The next part is joining the "Soft Parade". I think being part of the Soft Parade represents a manic acceptance of death, you're expecting it and waiting, but you have to force yourself to think that it's going to be okay. The sound of this section is not very honest at all, it's lying to yourself but the very essence of what life is, and the sound captures that perfectly. As for the horse and the whipping of its eyes, I couldn't tell you. The dude who annotated this line on Genius recommends a book to fully help understand this line. But I can only (for the most part) understand poetry when it's sung to me, I can't imagine reading an entire book of it. I bet the line is important, if someone wants to tell me their thoughts on it please do. Or if you want to call me an idiot for not understanding it you can do that too, I'll take all sorts of criticism.

Great album. I wish this one wasn't as poorly received as it was, because they sorta gave up on the pop and orchestral sound after this. It would've been super cool to see a version of Morrison Hotel with horns and strings. And why was Who Scared You not on this record? That's an incredible song. But I guess it is what it is. And again, if you want to call me a [&*!#]bag for not interpreting a song the way you would've wanted me to, you know where to get in contact with me, at [email protected]

 L.A. Woman by DOORS, THE album cover Studio Album, 1971
4.02 | 569 ratings

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L.A. Woman
The Doors Proto-Prog

Review by Progexile

4 stars The last Jim album and very bluesy. I've always seen their debut as their best and several others (including this one) as joint second. Oddly, I never warmed to Strange Days as an album though "When the Music's Over" is my fave Doors song.

This one starts with "The Changeling", a decent opener and moves on to "Love Her Madly" a natural single if ever they made one. The most buoyant song on this collection.

The next 2 songs are maybe the bluesiest on the album and are not outstanding before side 1 ends with the eipc "LA Woman", an enjoyable closer.

Side 2 opens with "L'America", one of the band's oddest efforts (along with "My Wild Love" from their 3rd album?). It grows on you.

Now comes my second favourite track. "Hyacinth House" features a deep vocal by the great Jim and superb organ by Manzarek. A gem.

"Crawling King Snake" and "The Wasp" lead us to the brilliant "Riders on the Storm" to finish off the album in style. My only comment on this song is Morrison's odd imagery like "Squirming Like a Toad". Do toads squirm Jim? The lyrics otherwise flow nicely.

A pretty good album - most tracks are worthwhile though only 2-3 stand out to my ears. Nevertheless, a good sign-off for the finest male singer in rock and a deserved 4 stars.

 A Collection (6CD) by DOORS, THE album cover Boxset/Compilation, 2011
4.49 | 9 ratings

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A Collection (6CD)
The Doors Proto-Prog

Review by Warthur
Prog Reviewer

5 stars No-frills, compact presentation of the six Doors studio albums that had Jim Morrison on lead vocals - which for many will be the only Doors albums they particularly need. Indeed, for some it will be too many - not everyone gets on with The Soft Parade - but I'm much happier to have it as part of this sleek package, since at least it isn't taking up too much room. As an instant, cost-effective way to get the true Doors classics (the debut, Strange Days, and L.A. Woman) and their second-tier albums all in one fell swoop, this package is really hard to beat, even if three of the albums here stand head and shoulders above the rest.
 Waiting for the Sun by DOORS, THE album cover Studio Album, 1968
3.62 | 404 ratings

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Waiting for the Sun
The Doors Proto-Prog

Review by theCoagulater

4 stars Everybody has their controversial opinions about a band's discography, this album sucks, this album's the best, and whatnot. With me, this is the best Doors album, almost, on some days it's L.A. Woman and on others it's this. But for the sake of this review Waiting For The Sun is my favorite.

The albums starts with Hello, I Love You. It's people like Morrison who can make these songs so weirdly amazing. Lines like "She's walking down the street, blind to every eye she meets, do you think you'll be the guy to make the queen of the angels sigh?" are so mystical and abstract. I don't quite get what it means (and if you say you do you're lying), but it still paints a weird picture in my head that fits everything else about this song perfectly.

Love Street continues this theme of love song with funky poetry, but I get this one even less. Still a great song. Fits perfectly in the album, it works great separating the poppy keyboard heavy sound of Hello, I Love You to the existential worrying of Not To Touch The Earth. I also just like the way he says "I see you live on Love Street, there's this store where the creatures meet."

Not To Touch The Earth is a very horrifying Halloweenish song, warning you of the mansion at the top of the hill, and finding JFK's corpse in some sort car that runs on "glue and tar". And then the song ends, you hear Jim heavily breathing, you figure that it's gonna fade out. Then you hear him starting to speak... "WHOA!!" Boom now the song's actually started. There's instruments in the back repeating this heavy jumping tone. The keyboard on one side making these unnatural noises and the guitar on the other doing the same thing while Morrison screams at you to run with him, as well as other obscene things. This is definitely one of The Doors' best.

Summer's Almost Gone is also haunting, but in a different way. Instead of knocking you to the floor and giving you a panic attack; it gives you a helping hand and wants away, with an annoying look in its eyes.

Wintertime Love brings it back to what the first two tracks were, it's a love song, great lyrics, but I like it better. Like the title implies, it's an extremely warm song, more than Hello, I Love You and Love Street. It takes you inside, gives you a warm blanket and fresh hot chocolate. It brings you back to health before throwing you out to the wolves again after less than two minutes.

The Unknown Solider is different wolf though, instead of making you imagine weird mansions and odd cars, it's a very real world song. Telling you about an unknown and unnamed solider, before playing the shot that killed him. The rest of the song is musically upbeat, dancing around the death of people who had no choice but to be there and die there, instead celebrating the end of this war regardless. Though the music still has an uneven quality to it, it knows what happened and it doesn't feel good about it.

As the first song on side two, Spanish Caravan brings you back around to imagining unusual scenes. Instead of horror, it's very adventurous. Talking about wanting to ride with a Spanish caravan. The switch of modes in the middle implies that our protagonist was taken by the caravan. The song speeds up and more electric instruments are added. This all paints a picture of an old caravan being dragged by horses speeding through hot unpopulated areas of Europe, while the protagonist is in the back writing about what he sees outside.

My Wild Love is a much softer song, talking about his "wild love" going around making enemies with the devil and such. This is definitely the least involved of all the songs here, but still enjoyable.

We Could Be So Good Together is very reminiscent of their first two albums. Almost sounds like's a Strange Days song that someone accidently put here. Very Doors lyrics, not as good a love song as this album's previous, but still a bop.

Yes, The River Know is another clam haunting track. To me it sounds like a very old and experienced man, on the verge of death, is relaying his life story to me in cryptic yet understandable terms, on a bench, near a river, in a park. He's using the river as sort of an analogy of the passing of life and the bringing a new. Each verse sounds like he remembers something, a regret, a love one he didn't spend enough time with, things he'll never be able to do. The song doesn't end in a bombastic way, it's sounds like I left the bench, said goodbye to the old man and went on my way/ Thinking and gaining things from the experience, looking at trees and dogs as I walk my way out of the park.

Five To One sounds like it starts where Yes, The River Knows left off. Having learned from whatever the old man said, and applying it to whatever sort of social change we're protesting for. This song is a slapper, if this isn't getting you to jump out of your seat and put a picket in your hand, than your listening to a completely different album.

 A Collection (6CD) by DOORS, THE album cover Boxset/Compilation, 2011
4.49 | 9 ratings

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A Collection (6CD)
The Doors Proto-Prog

Review by VianaProghead
Prog Reviewer

4 stars Review Nș 567

"A Collection" is a very special compilation of The Doors and was released in 2011. This is a package that includes their six studio albums, "The Doors" and "Strange Days", both from 1967, "Waiting For The Sun" from 1968, "The Soft Parade" from 1969, "Morrison Hotel" from 1970 and "L.A. Woman" from 1971. All these albums were recorded when Jim Morrison was alive and was member of the band. It doesn't include their ninth very special studio album "An American Prayer", also featuring Jim Morrison, but recorded and released only after his dead, by the remaining band's members.

As I've already reviewed all these six albums previously on Progarchives, in a more extensive way, I'm not going to do it again. So, if you are interested to know, in more detail, what I wrote about them before, I invite you to read those my reviews. However, in here I'm going to write something about them in a more short way. So, of course, I'm not going to analyze them track by track, as I made before, but I'm only going to make a global appreciation of all those albums. "The Doors": "The Doors" is considered the great masterpiece from th e band, one of their most progressive albums. This is a perfect album with no weaknesses. Some of the songs included on this album, such as "Light My Fire", "Alabama Song (Whisky Bar)", "Break On Through (To The Other Side)" and "The End" are successes that have been immortalized by the band and who contributed to immortalize the band too. When we heard "Light My Fire" and "The End" we can see why The Doors is considered one of the most important bands to the foundation of progressive rock.

"Strange Days": Although not as good as "The Doors", "Strange Days" can still be considered a masterpiece. The album consists of songs that didn't make part of their debut album. "Strange Days" is a great album, well balanced and with great songs like "When The Music's Over", which follows the same musical formula of "The End" of "The Doors". It's a fantastic album if you enjoy their first album and it's also very special for people like me who love more their earlier musical works. "The Doors" and "Strange Days" are the best representative albums of the style of The Doors.

"Waiting For The Sun": After the first two very strong psychedelic albums, their third album appeared softer and full of ballads, which has been criticized by fans and critics. However and despite not be as good as "The Doors" and "Strange Days" are, it still is a great album, very well balanced and that maintain the same musical formula of the two previous albums. It's one of their best works and remains a perfect partner to their two first albums. All in all, it's a very good album, not up to the level of the two preceding ones, but still is a great piece of psychedelic, blues, jazz and rock.

"The Soft Parade": "The Soft Parade" is considered the weakest studio album of The Doors. A big change in the production didn't help the album's success, especially the addition of brass and string arrangements. It was much criticized and even be considered as a sellout commercial album. I can't agree with most of the critics about it. It's true that it's less good than their previous albums but it has a handful of good songs and quality enough to be seen as a good album of their psychedelic style. And I'm not pretty sure if "The Soft Parade" is weaker than "Morrison Hotel" is. "Morrison Hotel": After their more experimental previous work "The Soft Parade", which wasn't very well received, the group went back to their more traditional roots. On this album, there is a slight steer toward the blues, which would be fully explored by the band on their next studio album "L.A.Woman". Nothing complex here, but the arrangements are good, the same happens with the recording and the mixing. As I said before, I'm not sure if "The Soft Parade" is weaker than "Morrison Hotel" is. Anyway, "The Soft Parade" and "Morrison Hotel" are the weakest studio albums of The Doors.

"L.A. Woman": "L.A.Woman" is a great album and represents one of the best works of The Doors. It represents a clear change into their musical direction, from their earlier psychedelic musical period to a more blues/rock oriented style. Personally, I must confess that I'm not a great fan of blues. So, I prefer their earlier psychedelic period. However, "L.A.Woman" is an album full of great songs, especially "Riders On The Storm", which is a masterpiece. Though I prefer the earlier phase of The Doors, maybe here they were most inventive. It's their best album since "Strange Days".

Conclusion: "A Collection" is a very nice compilation album because it has all the six studio albums released by The Doors when Jim Morrison was in the band. So, it comprises all the essential works that you really must have from The Doors. But, if you already have all the six studio albums you don't need to buy this compilation, because it hasn't anything new to offer, like bonus tracks. Still, if you are a beginner with the band and you don't have all these albums yet, this is an excellent alternative to own all the essential discography from The Doors. If you aren't a great fan, how I am, and you don't need to buy the original albums, it's the better option, because you maybe save in money and space.

Prog is my Ferrari. Jem Godfrey (Frost*)

 Essential Rarities (The Best of the '97 Box Set) by DOORS, THE album cover Boxset/Compilation, 1999
3.30 | 8 ratings

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Essential Rarities (The Best of the '97 Box Set)
The Doors Proto-Prog

Review by VianaProghead
Prog Reviewer

3 stars Review Nș 564

"Essential Rarities (The Best Of '97 Box Set)" is a compilation of The Doors and was released in 1999. It was released as part of the Box Set "The Complete Studio Recordings" which was released in 1999. "Essential Rarities" was released in 1999 as a single CD. It contains studio cuts, live cuts and demos taken from "The Doors Box Set" released in 1997.

So, all the tracks have been released on the 1997 Box set, with the exception of the bonus track "Woman Is A Devil", which was edited from the 1969 Elektra Studios "Rock Is Dead" sessions, and wasn't included in original the Box set. It has also some tracks that appear in a more complete form than their Box set versions. For instance, "Roadhouse Blues" has a thirty-five second musical section that was cut from the song and "Who Scared You?" has an extra verse.

"Essential Rarities (The Best Of '97 Box Set)" has fifteen tracks. "Hello To The Cities" represents the presentation of the band on a live show. It was taken from a live recording on Ed Sullivan Show in 1967 and at Cobo Hall, Detroit in 1970. It's a very short track with less than a minute, a presentation to all the cities. "Break On Through (To The Other Side)" was originally recorded on "The Doors". This version was recorded live at the Isle of Wight Festival, England in 1970. It's a great version because it has an extended introduction with a back and forth playing of the keyboards and guitar, and a lengthy guitar playing. "Roadhouse Blues" was originally recorded on "Morrison Hotel". This version was recorded live at Madison Square Garden, New York in 1970. This is another great version of the song. "Hyacinth House" was originally recorded on "L.A. Woman". This version is a demo recorded at Robby Krieger's home studio in 1969. This is a faster version, without keyboards and drums. It's a good version and is cool to have Densmore on the bongos. "Who Scared You?" was never released on any of their studio albums. This version was recorded at Elektra Studios in 1969. It's a bluesy song more focused on Morrison's vocals than any other instrument. It has a cool beat and a cool chorus too. "Whiskey, Mystics And Men" was never released on any of their studio albums. This version was also recorded at Elektra Studios in 1970. It's a nice song, one more bluesy song with a cool story. Probably, it was a leftover song of "Morrison Hotel". "I Will Never Be Untrue" was never released on any of their studio albums. This version was recorded live at the Aquarius Theatre, Hollywood in 1969. It's a slow blues song, that at sometimes can be funny due to its lyrics. "Moonlight Drive" was originally recorded on "Strange Days". This version is a demo recorded at World Pacific Studios in 1965. Originally, it's a very catchy song. On this version Morrison sounds a little bit different and the recordings aren't quite the best. "Queen Of The Highway" was originally recorded on "Morrison Hotel". This version is an alternative version that was recorded at Elektra Studios in 1969. It's another catchy song. This new version sounds like something you'd hear in a lounge singing room with a piano to a group of friends. "Someday Soon" was never released on any of their studio albums. This version was recorded live at the Seattle Centre in 1970. This song starts out slow but then starts to pick up higher. It's a good song that could be part of "Waiting For The Sun" or "Morrison Hotel". "Hello, I Love You" was originally recorded on "Waiting For The Sun". This version is a demo recorded at World Pacific Studios in 1965. It's a faster version and where we have a harmonica being played after every verse. It's very cool. "Orange County Suite" was never released on any of their studio albums. This version was recorded at Elektra Studios in 1970. It's a blues song that is slow and provides a good story. "The Soft Parade" was originally recorded on "The Soft Parade". This version was recorded live on PBS Television, New York in 1969. Originally it's a great song that goes through so many styles that it's mind blasting. But, this version was recorded on the television which means that it was recorded badly. Still, it's cool. "The End" was originally recorded on "The Doors". This version was recorded live at Madison Square Garden, New York in 1970. It's probably the most known, better and progressive song of The Doors. What I can say about this version? I can say that it's even lengthier. A version with about more six minutes extended.

"Essential Rarities" has an extra track "Woman Is A Devil" which was never released on any of their studio albums. It's the only track that wasn't on the Box set. This version was also recorded at Elektra Studios in 1969. This is a song very calm and reserved, which sounds like from it was played in a smoky pub with the wonderful guitar playing by Krieger.

Conclusion: "Essential Rarities (The Best Of '97 Box Set)" is a collection of rare demos and live tracks previously available only as a bonus disc in "The Complete Studio Recordings". It's a bunch of stuff that many hard core fans need, and that probably some have already purchased as part of the Box set or as bootlegs. If not, this is a good way to get a bunch of pretty good cuts, highlighted by the 1969 outtakes "Woman Is A Devil", and "Who Scared You?" and the 1965 demo "Moonlight Drive". Still, this is just for hardcore fans since there just isn't anything that is noteworthy for the casual listener, apart from possibly those three previously mentioned tracks. However, those are still specialized items.

Prog is my Ferrari. Jem Godfrey (Frost*)

 The Very Best of The Doors by DOORS, THE album cover Boxset/Compilation, 2007
3.27 | 21 ratings

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The Very Best of The Doors
The Doors Proto-Prog

Review by VianaProghead
Prog Reviewer

3 stars Review Nș 562

"The Very Best Of The Doors" is a compilation of The Doors that was released in 2007. It's a compilation with songs belonging to their six previous studio albums, the albums with Morrison. It has the same songs released on "The Best Of The Doors (1985)" with more 15 songs. The Wal-Mart edition, besides the two mentioned CD's, has also a DVD filmed during their European tour, in 1968. The DVD has five tracks: "Hello, I Love You" (it isn't a live version but a studio version played over footage), "Light My Fire", "Spanish Caravan", "Love Me Two Times" and "Unknown Soldier".

So, "The Very Best Of The Doors" has thirty four tracks. "Break On Through (To The Other Side)" is one of the band's most popular songs. "Strange Days" is a dark song with great atmosphere. It has the use of a synthesizer, one of the earlier examples. "Alabama Song (Whisky Bar)" is a song of "Hauspostille" of Bertolt Brecht with music by Kurt Weill. This is a great version. "Love Me Two Times" has a slight touch of blues, an usual thing in many of their songs. "Light My Fire" brought the fame and recognition, bringing The Doors as a symbol of the generation of the late 60's. "Spanish Caravan" is a flamenco song with the beginning riffs taken from "Asturias (Leyenda)" of Isaac Albeniz. The composition and arrangements are original and great. "The Crystal Ship" is a love song inspired by Morrison's first love. It has a mysterious and dark sound. "The Unknown Soldier" is Morrison's reaction to Vietnam War and the way the conflict was depicted in American's media. It's a classic protest song. "The End" was about the breaking with Morrison's girlfriend Mary Werbelow. It's one of their best and most progressive songs. "People Are Strange" is about the alienation, be an outsider and a loner person. It's a sad song with a dark atmosphere. It has ironic and sarcastic lyrics. "Back Door Man" is a blues song written by Willie Dixon and recorded by Howlin' Wolf. This version is a great cover. "Moonlight Drive" is one of the first songs written by Morrison. It's the song that Morrison sung to Manzarek in Venice Beach. It's a good song with a nice rhythm. "End Of The Night" is an obscure ballad with a dark atmosphere that makes of it a hypnotic song. "Five To One" is a heavy song, with energetic Morrison's vocals and the distorted guitar of Krieger. It's also memorable due to the lyrics. "When The Music's Over" grows in intensity, like "The End". It has a great climax and is one of their most progressive tracks. "Bird Of Prey" wasn't released in any studio album of the band. It was taken from "An American Prayer". "Love Her Madly" is a great rock song with nice lyrics and good performances. The guitar performance of Krieger is great. "Riders On The Storm" is a legendary track. It was their last song recorded, as well as Morrison's last recorded song. It was played live on their last live performance. "Orange County Suite" wasn't released in any studio album of the band. It was taken from "Essential Rarities". "Runnin' Blue" has a country style, with violin, brass and string instruments. Krieger shares the vocal duties with Morrison, a rarity in their career. "Hello, I Love You" is one of their most pop songs. It's a nice catchy song. I never understood the dislike of many fans. "The WASP (Texas Radio And The Big Beat)" is a great song, with good riffs, nice drumming and where Morrison recites lyrics. "Stoned Immaculate" wasn't released on any studio album of the band. It was taken from "An American Prayer". "Soul Kitchen" is a nice rock song performed with great energy. It's a tribute to restaurant "Olivia's" in Venice Beach, where Morrison and Manzarek met for the first time. "Peace Frog" has good lyrics and rhythm, nice guitar and good keyboard playing. "L.A. Woman" is a great song with a nice combination of the traditional rock with jazzy elements. It has a great vocal work by Morrison. "Waiting For The Sun" is a psychedelic song that changes from the quiet to heavy passages. It has a great work and a melodic vocal performance. "Touch Me" is notable for the extensive use of brass, string instruments and the saxophone solo by Curtis Amy. The orchestral arrangements accent Morrison's vocals. "The Changeling" is an obscure and strange song. It's a great song with good guitars by Krieger. The bass lines are great. "Wishful Sinful" is a good and nice ballad, one of the best ballads created by them. It has nice orchestral arrangements. "Love Street" is a nice and soft ballad with great piano and guitar arrangements, supported by the beautiful voice of Morrison. "The Ghost Song" wasn't released on any studio album of the band. It was taken from "An American Prayer". "Whiskey, Mystics And Men" wasn't released on any og their studio albums. It was taken from "The Doors: Box Set". "Roadhouse Blues" has lyrics about the lifestyle of many rock star musicians. It's a blues/rock song with great harmonica and piano works.

Conclusion: Of the so many compilations released by the band, "The Very Best Of The Doors" is really one of the best compilations of the band and the most complete of all compilations I know from them. Besides be well representative of the band, it has also some tracks that weren't released on any of their studio albums. It has also some iconic and progressive tracks, like "Light My Fire", "The End", "L.A. Woman" and "Riders On The Storm". So, if you don't know well The Doors career when Morrison was in the group, this compilation is probably the right place to start with them.

Prog is my Ferrari. Jem Godfrey (Frost*)

Thanks to erik neuteboom for the artist addition. and to Quinino for the last updates

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