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THE WHO

Proto-Prog • United Kingdom


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The Who picture
The Who biography
Formed in 1964, Hammersmith, London, UK - Split in 1982 (occasionally re-formed for live appearances)
Resumed regular touring in 1999 and recorded a new albums in 2006 and 2019

One of the greatest of all rock and roll bands and one of the most influential of all time, The Who formed in 1964, when drummer Keith Moon left the Beachcombers and joined The Detours, who included singer Roger Daltrey, guitarist Pete Townshend, and bassist John Entwistle. The Who arrived on the scene at a crossroads in the English music scene: The Beatles were still king but were beginning to turn from the bubble gum pop of previous albums, the Merseybeat boom was fading and London was becoming the center of English music. A residency at London's famed Marquis club gave them a stage to make their impression: above all, The Who were a live band that had to be seen as well as heard. There first hit, "I Can't Explain", led to regular TV appearances and a tour with The Beatles. It also got them signed to Decca Records, where they recorded their first album, "My Generation". The album was a hit in England, reaching #5 on the charts, while the title track became an anthem of sorts for the times and still perhaps their best known song.

The Who were very original in that their arrangements were far from the normal in rock those days. Pete was more of a rhythm player who had Keith and John playing around him instead of
merely holding a beat, an influence acknowledged by the way Prog rock turned conventional rock idioms on their ear with regards to arrangement and traditional roles of the instruments. Keith's drumming was described as 'lead' drumming and John was having bass solos as early as 1965 in rock music.

Success out of the gate gave the group some measure of creative control on their next album which they lacked on the first. Pete and manager Kit Lambert had been talking about extended themes and ideas in rock and roll for some time. When The Who went into the studio for their second album in 1966 each group member was to contribute songs to help generate more revenue in royalties for the group, the group having a rather high overhead in terms of destroyed guitars and drum kits. When the others were not able to meet their quota of songs for the new album, Pete and Kit stepped in to fill the album out, and came up with what would be one of the trademarks of prog music in the future, the extended song cycle "A Quick One", which would be the title o...
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Old England, New EnglandOld England, New England
UNICORN 2019
$8.81
$13.84 (used)
It's Hard [Remastered]It's Hard [Remastered]
Remastered · Extra tracks
Geffen 1997
$7.49
$6.98 (used)

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THE WHO discography


Ordered by release date | Showing ratings (top albums) | Help Progarchives.com to complete the discography and add albums

THE WHO top albums (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

2.96 | 173 ratings
My Generation
1965
2.95 | 161 ratings
A Quick One
1966
3.54 | 235 ratings
The Who Sell Out
1967
3.98 | 557 ratings
Tommy
1969
4.41 | 582 ratings
Who's Next
1971
4.50 | 589 ratings
Quadrophenia
1973
3.51 | 198 ratings
By Numbers
1975
3.31 | 206 ratings
Who Are You
1978
2.49 | 117 ratings
Face Dances
1981
2.59 | 110 ratings
It's Hard
1982
2.88 | 86 ratings
Endless Wire
2006
3.44 | 13 ratings
WHO
2019

THE WHO Live Albums (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

4.02 | 154 ratings
Live At Leeds
1970
4.05 | 44 ratings
The Kids Are Alright (Original Soundtrack of the Film)
1979
2.69 | 23 ratings
Whoīs Last
1984
3.27 | 15 ratings
Join Together
1990
3.50 | 4 ratings
The Who Live (Golden Age serie)
1993
3.33 | 33 ratings
Live at the Isle of Wight Festival 1970
1996
2.96 | 29 ratings
BBC Sessions
2000
3.95 | 21 ratings
Live At The Royal Albert Hall
2003
3.83 | 6 ratings
Greatest Hits Live
2010
3.94 | 13 ratings
Live At Hull
2012

THE WHO Videos (DVD, Blu-ray, VHS etc)

3.85 | 30 ratings
The Kids are Alright
1979
3.60 | 10 ratings
Who's Better, Who's Best
1988
3.59 | 18 ratings
Live at the Isle of Wight Festival
1998
3.94 | 12 ratings
Who's Next - Classic Albums
1999
3.89 | 16 ratings
Live at the Royal Albert Hall
2000
2.86 | 7 ratings
Live & Alive
2003
2.71 | 7 ratings
The Vegas Job
2006
3.11 | 16 ratings
Amazing Journey
2007
3.73 | 14 ratings
The Who at Kilburn: 1977
2008
3.48 | 14 ratings
Maximum R&B Live
2009
3.88 | 8 ratings
Live in Texas '75
2012
3.17 | 10 ratings
Quadrophenia: Live in London
2014
3.84 | 6 ratings
Live in Hyde Park
2015
4.00 | 1 ratings
Tommy: Live at the Royal Albert Hall
2017

THE WHO Boxset & Compilations (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

2.25 | 15 ratings
Magic Bus: The Who on Tour
1968
3.34 | 30 ratings
Meaty, Beaty, Big and Bouncy
1971
3.73 | 37 ratings
Odds & Sods
1974
3.33 | 6 ratings
Who's Missing
1985
4.07 | 11 ratings
Thirty Years Of Maximum R&B
1994
3.81 | 26 ratings
My Generation - The Very Best of The Who
1996
2.26 | 4 ratings
The Who (budget compilation)
1997
4.04 | 28 ratings
The Ultimate Collection
2002
3.27 | 15 ratings
Then and Now
2004
1.85 | 10 ratings
Greatest Hits
2009
5.00 | 5 ratings
Live At Leeds 40th Anniversary Super-Deluxe Collectors' Edition
2010
4.83 | 6 ratings
Quadrophenia - The Director's Cut (Super Deluxe Limited Edition)
2011
3.50 | 4 ratings
The Who Hits 50!
2014

THE WHO Official Singles, EPs, Fan Club & Promo (CD, EP/LP, MC, Digital Media Download)

2.73 | 11 ratings
I'm a Boy
1966
2.76 | 10 ratings
Happy Jack
1966
3.80 | 5 ratings
Summertime Blues
1970
3.07 | 7 ratings
Let's See Action / When I Was A Boy
1971
3.50 | 2 ratings
Relay
1972
4.11 | 9 ratings
5.15
1973
0.00 | 0 ratings
Substitute
1976
2.50 | 2 ratings
Athena
1982
0.00 | 0 ratings
Ready Steady Who
1983
3.05 | 3 ratings
Thirty Years Of Maximum R&B sampler
1994

THE WHO Reviews


Showing last 10 reviews only
 WHO by WHO, THE album cover Studio Album, 2019
3.44 | 13 ratings

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WHO
The Who Proto-Prog

Review by Mortte

4 stars I have been huge Who-fan almost my whole life! It was not long ago, I was thinking there will not be new Who-album anymore. In 2018 they didn't even tour. I didn't hear anywhere, that in the begin of this year Towshend had said, they were going make a new album. So I was really suprised, when in this autumn hearing, there was coming new album! First single 'Ball And Chain' was promising. So I went to the Who- store and ordered three vinyl version, where the vinyls are from Who-logo: blue, white and red. This album was named just Who. It's not the first time, in 1966 'A Quick One' was released in Germany and some other countries in the name 'the Who' with a little bit different songs. But I quess there is some self-irony, in these days there are young people, who never have heard about the Who and will ask 'Who?'. Anyway Towshend has always been those, who want to follow the time, but he's always managed to do it with style. So is it in this new album. This is the first album that I've heard, where is used autotune without any irritation to me.

Album starter 'All This Music Must Fade' really also has self-irony with it's lyrics: 'I don't care I know you're gonna hate this song. And that's fair, we never really got along. It's not new, not diverse. It won't light up your parade. It's just simple verse'. Anyway it starts album really well, in a very typical, energetic Who-way. 'Ball And Chain' is also very good song, reminds a little 'Who Are You', but is lot better than that many times heard piece. 'I don't Wanna Get Wise' is again very positive, energetic Who song. When 'Detour' starts, you may think, are they made their first glam rock song. But gladly there are softer parts, that make song really great! In 'Beads On One String' direction starts to go little bit mediocre, but it has still great melodies. In 'Hero Ground Zero' strings and energetic playing keep your interest on.

Second vinyl starts with 'Street Song' that I think is the most mediocre song in this album. But then direction changes totally in 'I'll Be Back'. When that eighties Steve Wonder reminding soft harmonica intro comes, you don't know what to think. This song is the only song sung by Townshend and I think it would have fit more into his solo album. 'Break the News' is another oddball in this album, but I like it as it`s innocence. But the greatest is yet to come: 'Rockin` in Rage' could have been in Quadrophenia with it's powerful, but dark chords. Also acoustic spanish-influenced piece 'She Rocked My World' is just great! In my vinyl version there is one 10' vinyl with bonus song 'Sand' that is unreleased demo-track from the sixties. Although I can understand, why they didn't released it in the sixties, it's now sounding really great in it's sixties production and young energy!

When 'Endless Wire' came in 2006, I was totally suprised how great it was! And have to say for that reason I got lot of expections of this new album, but they didn't fulfill fully. Anyway this album is my 10 best album list of this year. I really loved in 'Endless Wire' how songs change between fully acoustic and really energetic. This new album is sounding like they've tried to make it radio friendly. Also there are any as great songs as 'Fragments', 'Mike Post Theme' or 'Black Widow's Eyes' and really not mini-opera. But I am glad only thing that connects this to 'Face Dances' is art director, this album is just so much better. All you Who-fans, who think 'Quadrophenia' was the last great Who album, I think you should at least have a chance to this new one and also 'Endless Wire'. All you who never listened the Who, do begin from 'Who's Next' or 'Quadrophenia'.

 WHO by WHO, THE album cover Studio Album, 2019
3.44 | 13 ratings

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WHO
The Who Proto-Prog

Review by TCat
Collaborator Eclectic Team

3 stars The Who's studio output has, of course, been rather spotty since 1982, and after several breakups and reunions, has only resulted in two studio albums; "Endless Wilre" in 2006, and more currently "WHO", which was released in November of 2019. All that remains of the band is Roger Daltrey doing almost all of the lead vocals, and Pete Townshend on guitars, background vocals and lead vocals on "I'll Be Back" and all three of the deluxe edition's bonus tracks. All other instruments are performed by guest musicians and these guests all perform on different specific tracks. Of course Keith Moon died in 1978 and John Entwistle died in 2002, or course each death had a lasting effect on the band and it shows in the lack of new output.

On this album, both Daltry and Townsend provide the consistency of this album, and they still provide that same The Who signature sound, however, both of them recorded their parts separately and the other parts were added by various musicians. As far as the bass parts; most of them are provided by Pino Palladino who has been in The Who's line-up since 2002 and has also performed with John Mayer. Zak Starkey (Ringo Starr's son) has also been a regular drummer for The Who since 1996 and performs on 4 of the tracks. Benmont Tench from Tom Petty's band "The Heartbreakers" plays keyboards on 3 tracks and Joey Waronker (session musician for Beck and "R.E.M.) also plays drums on 3 tracks. Everything else is done by various other artists.

One of the most interesting things about the album is the cover which is a series of photos that represent influences to The Who's music along with different notable symbols and things that pertain to the band's history, including the word "Detour" which not only references one of the more catchy tracks on this album, but also is a nod to the name "The Detours", the name the band used before becoming The Who.

As Daltry is lead vocalist on almost all of the tracks on the regular album, so is Townshend the songwriter on all of the tracks except "Beads on One String", The Who's version of a nice ballad (where Daltry even tempers his vocals accordingly), which Townshend shares with Josh Hunsacker, and "Break the News" which is written by Simon Townshend, Pete's younger brother.

The music on this album is definitely interesting enough in that it really reflects the trademark sound of The Who's music through the years. "Ball and Chain" is the first single off the album, yet it really lacks anything interesting. However, as mentioned previously, "Detour" is the first really memorable song up to this point (which is track 4) with a nice catchy hook and rhythm pattern. After that, "Beads on One String" is a definite highlight as a more ballad-like track, and "Hero Ground Zero" features some great orchestral (mostly strings) effects that go uncredited on the album, and that gives it a sweeping feeling that helps it stand out.

Daltry's vocals haven't suffered or changed much over the years, and that is mostly a good thing. I do believe he has more restraint and control most of the time on this album, maybe a bit mellower at times, however, he still proves he has plenty of strength when he needs it, and most people might not even detect a difference in his vocals. In most cases, it has been proven that more restraint never hurt Daltry's delivery, and in this album, even his outbursts are timed quite well. There is still a bit of over-the-top dramatics from time to time, but it works well here.

Townshend's guitar work is still quite similar to his past work also. He doesn't do anything that stands right out, but still performs as he is expected to, which is where his strength has been. His other strength is in songwriting, and, even though there isn't nothing as amazing as "Baba O'Riley", "Won't Get Fooled Again" or even close to the amazing rock opera albums "Tommy" and "Quadropheia", it's definitely much more interesting and varied than most of the songs on "Who Are You" and "It's Hard". Townshend still has his voice also, as shown on "I'll Be Back" which has the help of vocal effects to keep him on target, and unfortunately, this makes what might have been an interesting song turn into a schleppy sounding song that rips off Stevie Wonder complete with harmonica drenched instrumental support.

These songs are varied, which is really the best thing The Who could have done to try to bring in new listeners. I don't think anyone expected to hear any rock operas or amazing rocked out tracks that the band was famous for in the past. But the good thing here, is that they didn't revert to the post-"Quadrophenia" style of songs that sound all the same or heavily soaked in 80s style synth beats. They did keep things organic here, for the most part, and they give the songs more personality by giving a large amount of variety among the songs. The place where it all suffers is that most listeners would love to hear more of a rock edge among the mellower, more radio-friendly tracks. But even that gets some fulfillment especially in tracks like "Rockin' in Rage" and "All This Music Must Fade". But again, don't expect anything that will get your blood boiling and you might be able to see how they use variety to their advantage here.

Are the 3 bonus tracks sung by Pete Townshend worth getting the deluxe edition for? Well, personally, I have liked Townshend's vocals better in the past that were effectively used to smooth out the roughness of Daltry's vocals, but he doesn't always have the strength to carry off a full album as some of his solo work has proven. In the case of this album, "This Gun Will Misfire" is much better than the track that is used on the regular album where Pete sings, and should have been used. "Got Nothing to Prove" has a really cool retro vibe that will make you think this track came from "The Who Sell Out", with strings and a definite pre-1970s sound to the production. Cool. "Danny and My Ponies" is okay, but it uses the annoying auto-tune effect again. I'd rather hear his real voice. So, two of the bonus tracks are great and the last one gets ruined by electronics.

It's not a bad album, but its not excellent either. It's just nice. It's no "Quadrophenia" but its also better than "Face Dances" and "It's Hard", and as such, it stands out in the group of later albums. Still, there is not much in the way of progressive music here, but things aren't necessarily boring either. In the end, it comes off as a little better than average, but not quite enough to be considered excellent.

 Tommy by WHO, THE album cover Studio Album, 1969
3.98 | 557 ratings

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Tommy
The Who Proto-Prog

Review by Just Because

5 stars "1969 was going to be a good year"

Is this album better or worse than 'the Wall' , 'Jesus Christ Superstar', 'The Lamb'' ? I do not care. They all are great. However 'Tommy' influenced them. Funny that a listener can feel the contrast between tragic plot and exhilarating music. I would like to mention some songs of this masterpiece.

'Overture'. Bang, bang, bang ' And it flows nicely and represents main themes in a great way. It is a huge emission of energy. Keith`s drumming is awesome. John Entwistle`s brass instruments are more than appropriate and strengthen solemnity of the moment. Pete proves again that he is a master of rhythm guitar.

'1921'. Great ballad with nice vocals.

'Amazing Journey'. Very nice psychedelic piece.

'Cousin Kevin' and ' Fiddle About'. Two interesting yet controversial songs by John Entwistle. The latter has some hints on Pink Floyd of Syd Barret period.

'The Acid Queen'. A hard rock composition with tight chorus which reminds me of Sweet Wine by 'Cream'

'Underture'. Very good instrumental piece, however, overlong. IMHO Pete should have halved it.

'Pinball wizard'. Very catchy song. This melody keeps turning in my mind.

'Go to the Mirror'. It takes us back to Overture. Rhythm section is splendid (check especially the beginning and the last seconds of this song).

'I`m free'. Exultant voice of Roger expresses Tommy`s feelings when he got healed.

'Welcome'. A sweet song. Roger and Pete are as good here as in '1921'

'See me, feel me/Listening to You'. An uplifting song. The closing number is synergy of sublime and vigorous music and great lyrics. By the way, I recall the final scene of the movie: Tommy standing in the rays of the rising Sun . There was no other way to present visual and sonic equivalent of majesty.

 Quadrophenia by WHO, THE album cover Studio Album, 1973
4.50 | 589 ratings

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Quadrophenia
The Who Proto-Prog

Review by mariorockprog

5 stars 4.75: A masterpiece by Who, it is the history of young man that is looking by his real identity, and rely in some persons and ideals that ultimately disappoint him. Lyrically it is excellent, it maintain you entertained, and although the lyrics are not so deep, it has a coherent history, but mainly the way it is sung is amazing, they demonstrate that sometimes the way of singing and telling the history is more important that the history itself. The constant changes of tones in voices and the way they are interchanged impress me. Musically is very well supported with good solos, riffs and keyboard passages, without exaggerating in its presence, however, i feel it lacks something, it would be perfect if the music were as good as the lyrics and the vocalist interpretation, more elaborated and innovative. A really good album by the who that has a lot of prog elements that any prog listener will find interesting.
 Who's Next by WHO, THE album cover Studio Album, 1971
4.41 | 582 ratings

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Who's Next
The Who Proto-Prog

Review by TCat
Collaborator Eclectic Team

5 stars Warning: This review might upset some people.

Honestly, I wasn't going to review this album, because 1) it's been done so many times before, 2) most everybody already knows this album, and 3) I'm not a huge The Who fan. I definitely think Pete Townsend is amazing, but I can't stand Roger Daltry's singing or personality. I know that's a sad reason to not like a band, but at least I recognize the fact that this album, along with it's predecessor "Tommy", and the follow-up "Quadrophenia" are all essential albums, and I do love all three of them. But I can't stomach the rest of the albums.

Anyway, "Who's Next" is the second masterpiece in the trifecta of The Who's masterpiece albums. The other two are rock operas. The fact is, that this one was originally supposed to be a rock opera also called "Lifehouse", and most of the songs on this album are remnants of that project. The band was convinced by Kit Lambert, their manager, to release this as a regular album because the project was too complex. What we are left with are some amazing songs.

Even Roger's vocals and personality work for these songs (and for these three albums for that matter). But he does overemphasize his input to this band, Pete Townsend is really the creative force behind the band, but he was usually overshadowed by Daltry's personality. Thank goodness it all worked out for this album. I am sorry if I have offended anyone by my opinion about the band, but it is something I have always felt strongly about in reference to the band. Yes I know I have loved other bands even with when they have personnel in the band with overactive personalities, but Daltry has always rubbed me the wrong way.

Nevertheless, this album and "Quadrophenia" are both perfect albums meriting 6 stars in my own rating system, where 6 equals perfection. "Tommy" comes close to that, but doesn't quite reach the pinnacle, but I still consider it an excellent album. All the rest of their albums can only reach a maximum of 3 stars. I know this review didn't say much about the specific album, but if you haven't heard this album, then you shouldn't be reading about it anyway, you should be listening to it because you have some catching up to do. 5 stars.....Essential masterpiece.

 The Who Sell Out by WHO, THE album cover Studio Album, 1967
3.54 | 235 ratings

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The Who Sell Out
The Who Proto-Prog

Review by Mortte

5 stars Plenty of reviews written about this, I donīt think I can say anything new about it, but because I found the last review of it a bit poor, I think I should say something about it. I think the last review is a part of that trend in 2000`s to try to prove sixties music wasnīt as great as it was. I know there are many people, who think 2000`s music is as great as sixties and or/seventies, or maybe even better. I am not saying all the 2000 music is [&*!#], there are still great musicmakers, but in 60-70 specially major record companies hadnīt made their artists that kind of money making products as today. Of course money making has always been their priority, but the artists freedom to make music was much more bigger then, record companies gave them many chances to try to make selling albums before they throw them away than today. And I think that was one reason to the great music of 60-70, not the only.

About this masterpiece, I have listened Who now thirteen years and over a decade this has been the greatest Who album to me. Of course I really love also Tommy, Whoīs Next and Quadrophenia, but I have also always loved the energy of first Who albums. This album has both: energy of first Who albums, but also the more progressive music from the later albums. Only true sixties pop songs in this album are "Our Love Was" and "Canīt Reach You". I find the first side of the album as great as the second. "Odorono" and "Tattoo" are really spiritual, the latter is also very acoustic with great symbal playing from Moon. The side one ending piece "I can see for miles" is the greatest Who single to me, it has that great Who-energy and starting "Armenia City In the sky" too. "Silas Stingy" and "Sunrise" in the b-side are also very spiritual songs. The endind "Rael" is a crown of this album! Towshend used part of this song later in Tommy, as he did also some other earlier songs released later in Odds and Sodds, but I have found this version the best. Rael was also Towshendīs will to do larger entities just like "A Quick One, While Heīs Away" was a year later, but I think it was better although it was only almost six minutes long. There was part 2 of "Rael" that ended only into first album version credits, it was released later in the "Thirty Years of Maxium R`n`B".

About commercialism in music, even the Who had pressures of selling records that time. Their singles werenīt selling much in 1967 and although the Who Sell Out is masterpiece, it didnīt sell well. But what band of today decides to make an rockopera after commercial failings? The Who took a big risk into it, but it was worth of it. Tommy become one of their biggest artistic and commercial success. 1967 was the begin year of concept albums. I think the Who sell out was one of the most genius concept albums of that year. To built up album round the pirate radio channel Radio London was very original and rebellious idea and it still works well.

This is really not prog album, specially if you think prog is the same as Genesis and Yes seventies albums. I listen a lot progmusic, but to me any music genre is not better than the other. To me this Who album is one of the ten best all time albums. Itīs just because itīs genius sad melodies also itīs brilliant idea of concept album. Really have always loved the cover of it. I recommend people who donīt like sixties music generally, doesnīt listen it and really doesnīt write reviews about it. Although Whoīs best years are over, they continue to play their great music. I was really happy about their latest great live version of Tommy. "Endless Wire" from 2006 was also really great new album, to me itīs better than "Who by Numbers" or "Who are You". So I am not sad although most of the new music just bores me. Although I have now listened music forty years, I still found great albums from sixties and seventies that Iīve never heard.

 The Who Sell Out by WHO, THE album cover Studio Album, 1967
3.54 | 235 ratings

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The Who Sell Out
The Who Proto-Prog

Review by Prog Leviathan
Prog Reviewer

3 stars This jaunty, sarcastic, sometimes cynical, sometimes brilliant, sometimes tedious release by the Who reminds me that many legendary rock bands sound nothing like what we hear today on classic rock FM. For example, who would guess that the band that blasts out "Who Are You" and "Won't Get Fooled Again" would find rave reviews with this dithering collection of tongue-in-cheek songs? Listeners born after 1975 beware: The Who Sell Out is probably not what you think it is.

So what is it? It's a mostly goofy art-pop album that sounds very '60's and very British. Is it bad? No, it's just ... The Who Sell Out. Be prepared for a handful of genuinely fun pop tunes like "Our Love", a few moments of Who-style heaviness, and songs that will probably make you shrug your shoulders with ambivalence. I found the second side of the album more musically engaging.

The album's best moments are the faux-commercials, which are legitimately brilliant at times. Commendable cynicism-- something I can't imagine a massive pop-star of today coming close to including in their work. Frankly, this is what elevates the song for 3-star status to me. Maybe some of the B-sides will reveal themselves to me in the future, but for now, I think that this music will probably hook some listeners much more than others.

Songwriting: 2 - Instrumental Performances: 3 - Lyrics/Vocals: 2 - Style/Emotion/Replay: 3

 My Generation by WHO, THE album cover Studio Album, 1965
2.96 | 173 ratings

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My Generation
The Who Proto-Prog

Review by BigDaddyAEL1964

3 stars That debut album by the Who was just another Britpop - rock album... kinda.

Listening carefully, you can see the signs if their lyrical intelligence and their compositional skills. Paying tribute to their influences was an essential back then (with James Brown's "Please Please Please" and the classic Bo Diddley's "I'm A Man"), but the y struck gold with their on hit single too, "My Generation", on of the most well known songs of the 60s.

Absolutely no prog here yet, but an album worth owning for historical as well as musical reasons.

3 stars by me, for a significant effort that helped built a storied career.

 The Who Sell Out by WHO, THE album cover Studio Album, 1967
3.54 | 235 ratings

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The Who Sell Out
The Who Proto-Prog

Review by DamoXt7942
Forum & Site Admin Group Avant/Cross/Neo/Post Teams

3 stars Another impact like a musical collision in 1967. This greatly sensational concept album released in the same year as The Beatles' "Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band" is quite impressive and addictive through kinda fictitious radio show with some fictitious advertisements. As a concept album, this one could be felt "so-called theatrical" sorry, but their incredible intention to follow The Beach Boys' "Pet Sounds" should be enough understandable. Each track was positively and acceptably composed and produced (and appropriate for the pop chart!), although entangled musical / melodic phrases or cynical footprints are here and there ... maybe Pete's unique and hilarious idea was breathed into this creation.

Above mentioned, every "leading" song between jingles is pretty pop and catchy flooded with light rhythm bases and mid-60s psychedelic keyboard-based ornaments. We can say it could not connote "so-called progressive" essence in itself. An important point is that quirky jingles like an old-fashioned Radio London programme or fantastic advertisements like "Heinz Baked Beans" or "Odorono" are very innovative and play the momentous role to consolidate a radio fantasia together all around the album. Easily guess they had created and produced this funny radio programme guide with laughing out loudly, and composition with serious appearance. Yes they made sure to "sell out" the concept (in a sense) album, we can mention here after listening to "Sell Out".

Anyway let me emphasize this funky sleeve pics completely explain the content in this funky sleeve. Enjoy the inside and outside.

 Live At Leeds by WHO, THE album cover Live, 1970
4.02 | 154 ratings

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Live At Leeds
The Who Proto-Prog

Review by Guillermo
Prog Reviewer

3 stars This review is about the original LP release from 1970.

"The greatest live album of all time". Well. In my opinion, it isn't. I expected great things from this album after I read that it was considered by many people as a great live album. Maybe if I have listened to this album when I was a 13-15 year old teenager maybe I could consider this album as "the greatest live album of all time". But now...

Anyway, it is an energetic live album, with "raw" and spontaneus performances by a young band. But even with all these things being considered, I still think that there are better performances of some of these songs in other live albums. For example: the live version of "Young Man Blues" which was released in "The Kids Are Alright" soundtrack album in 1979 is better than the live version which was included in "Live at Leeds". The live version of "Summertime Blues" which was included in the "Woodstock" film is also better than the live version which was included in "Live at Leeds".

"My Generation" in "Live at Leeds" is a long version which also has a lot of improvisation from the band, also including some parts from other songs like "See Me, Feel Me" and "Sparks" from the "Tommy" Rock Opera. It is too long (15 minutes in duration) and it is not very interesting for me. The song "Magic Bus" has never been one of my favorite songs from the band, and this live version is not so good.

Anyway, "Live at Leeds" includes very energetic performances from the band, which are good but not better than other live recordings from the band, with Keith Moon's "hyperactive" drums playing, Pete Townshend's heavy guitar playing, John Entwistle's "thunderfingers" bass playing, and Roger Daltrey's very good lead vocals. But the original "Live at Leeds" album from 1970 also showed some mistakes in their playing and singing. Maybe due to this, it could be considered as an "honest" and "raw" live recording from this band, with the later expanded editions from this album being released with "corrections" done in the recording studio. So, the original LP release of "Live at Leeds" has it merits due to the more spontaneous playing and singing. Also, the cover design was a very good idea, with it being like a parody from a bootleg LP.

Good but not- essential, at least for me.

Thanks to micky for the artist addition. and to Quinino for the last updates

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