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MOTHER TURTLE

Heavy Prog • Greece


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Mother Turtle biography
Founded in Thessaloniki, Greece in 2011 (Initially as "HOGWEED")

MOTHER TURTLE started as a jam band by musicians that were already very active, being involved individually in several other music projects and doing live gigs on a weekly basis. But during those jam sessions, some solid musical ideas were developed and after a lot of rehearsing they evolved into songs. Main influences include the greats of the genre such as progressive rock RUSH, CAMEL, GENESIS, FRANK ZAPPA, MARILLION and many others. The band consists of Kostis HASOPOULOS (bass, backing vocals), Kostas KONSTANTINIDIS (guitar, vocals), George MPALTAS (drums, percussion, backing vocals) and George THEODOROPOULOS (piano, organ, synths, programming).

First live gig was under the name HOGWEED in April 2012. The name changed to MOTHER TURTLE a little bit later and since they played various gigs, sharing the stage with fellow bands such as POEM, LAZY AFTERSHOW, 3-FOLD PAIN and also Swedish vintage heavy rockers SIENA ROOT in Athens in April 2013.

The first self-titled 7-track album was released on 4th of October 2013 and was recorded, mixed and mastered from February to July 2013 in Sin City Studios, Thessaloniki by sound engineer Kostas Kofinas. The whole album is available for online streaming and digital downloading in their page on Bandcamp.

The band mixes successfully elements from symphonic, folk, neo- and heavy progressive with the latter potentially standing out a bit clearer in their influences; they still though remain a band difficult to categorise and come highly recommended.

Biography kindly provided by the band - edited by aapatsos

See also: HERE

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MOTHER TURTLE discography


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MOTHER TURTLE top albums (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

3.90 | 53 ratings
Mother Turtle
2013
3.91 | 66 ratings
II
2016
3.94 | 104 ratings
Zea Mice
2018

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MOTHER TURTLE Reviews


Showing last 10 reviews only
 Zea Mice by MOTHER TURTLE album cover Studio Album, 2018
3.94 | 104 ratings

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Zea Mice
Mother Turtle Heavy Prog

Review by VianaProghead
Prog Reviewer

4 stars Review Nº 255

Mother Turtle is a Greek progressive rock band that started as a jam studio band who take their cues from nearly all aspects of progressive rock, a synergy of many ingredients tossed, fried, and served in sizzler style to make this a very tasty prog band. Mother Turtle was formed in Thessaloniki in 2011 and previously was known as Hogweed. The band members cite as their inspirations Frank Zappa, Rush, Camel, Genesis, Marillion, and many other prog rock legends.

Mother Turtle is perhaps the most mischievous and known progressive rock band from Greece nowadays. Surely it's one of the most representatives of the term 'progressive', without the strain it has been through for at least 20 years, and not just within borders, is global. If there is an element independent of the exact musical content I'm looking for in a prog band, that's the unpredictability. Mother Turtle have this element as a key part of their temperament and that was shown both on their self-titled debut studio album in 2013 and on their second one 'II' in 2016. Even within each album the different elements are many and even the basic direction isn't the same on the tracks. Their third studio album 'Zea Mice' released in 2018 solemnly confirms the above it the most challenging listening experience offered us so far.

So, 'Zea Mice' is the third studio album of Mother Turtle and was released in 2018. The core of Kostas Konstantinidis, George Theodoropoulos and George Baltas have been writing music together since the band's self- titled debut, adding George Filopelou, Alexander Kiourntziadis and Babis Prodromidis for their sophomore release 'II'. All of them have stayed on for this third foray into the realm of the progressive rock music. So, the line up on the album is Kostas Konstantinidis (lead and backing vocals, guitars, MiDi, ukulele and composer), Giorgos Theodoropoulos (keyboards and programming), Babis Prodomidis (saxophone), Alex Kiourntziadis (violin), George Filopelou (bass) and Giorgos Mpalats (drums). 'Zea Mice' also features some guest musicians, Elpida Papakosma (vocals), Aristotelis Mavropoulos (reader) and Apostolis Georgiadis (percussion).

For an unsigned act in just their seventh year, Mother Turtle has presented some remarkably mature and fascinating writing to the world. Their independent work is polished and consistently gains reputation in the realm of progressive rock music. In their new work, Mother Turtle decided to silence vocally and concentrates almost only on music. From the earliest hearings, one could say that the band parodies an entire musical genre. Still, things in 'Zea Mice' are absolutely serious, really. But, perhaps the most interesting here is that 'Zea Mice' is an instrumental album, which is a departure from the band's first two previous albums, both of which featured regular vocal work. While several pieces on this release do feature recitations and meandering vocalizations, the vast majority of the album is an extended instrumental journey through funk, jazz, electronic, and ambient music. 'Zea Mice' proves that Mother Turtle can and will employ a varied approach to composing in a musical niche where it seams the sky is truly the only limit to them.

'Zea Mice' is comprised of three movements, simply entitled Parts I, II and III, each one is a multi-track ordeal. Being an instrumental album with ambiguous track titles and only a handful of spoken portions, all in Greek, by which to navigate, the album's artwork and language conjure thematic images of refuse, abandonment, and survival. Musically speaking, there are sections that trend toward jazz-fusion, others that are dirty hard rock, and others still that touch on the territory of avant-garde music. The composition of Mother Turtle remains the same and unaltered compared to the previous 'II'. The jamming spirit that seemed to adopt on their previous work, not only continues but it's also a vehicle to explore new prog paths that we have not been used to. One would say how the neo-prog and symphonic style of their self-titled debut has almost disappeared, while the jazz rock and Canterbury elements of 'II' have been thrilled by psych prog touches that bring to my mind the best moments of Ozric Tentacles and Porcupine Tree period of the 90's.

Conclusion: Mother Turtle impressed me once again and I would say that I'm very impressed with the way the band evolves. 'Zea Mice' is a difficult but a brilliant album of Mother Turtle where is difficult to point an indisputably lonely progressive style. One has to invest some time and effort to get to the bottom of this band and album that, besides a broad range of musical approaches, also offers an infinite number of instruments and moods. This isn't easy stuff, indeed. Personally, I think it really says something about the band's compositional abilities when they can write an instrumental album with unique tracks that don't simply bleed into one unidentifiable whole. In reality 'Zea Mice' is an ingenious combination of styles and flavours of rock, jazz, primal prog, contemporary prog, larded with folk, metal, oriental, classical and endless other influences. Prog rock must be revolutionary, and under this light, Mother Turtle is the undisputed marketers of this particular artistic insurrection. So, 'Zea Mice' is a strong and great album to listen to.

Prog is my Ferrari. Jem Godfrey (Frost*)

 II by MOTHER TURTLE album cover Studio Album, 2016
3.91 | 66 ratings

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II
Mother Turtle Heavy Prog

Review by VianaProghead
Prog Reviewer

4 stars Review Nº 254

Mother Turtle is a progressive rock band from Thessaloniki in Greece. They were formed in 2011 originally as a jam band, using the moniker Hogweed. In the jam sessions, some solid musical ideas were developed and after a lot of rehearsing the band were evolved into proper songs. They decided to change their name to Mother Turtle sometime in 2012, following the realization that they wanted to create their own music, based on common musical interests. Mother Turtle is influenced by great artists of the genre. Mother Turtle was the wedding of the classic prog with the modern prog. On their Facebook page the band includes as some of their influences Spock's Beard, Camel, King Crimson, Porcupine Tree, Frank Zappa, Pink Floyd, Rush, Marillion, Transatlantic, Neal Morse, Pain Of Salvation and Kansas.

The music of Mother Turtle tries to adapt the different elements of the prog rock music into their own music, taking advantage of the artistic freedom that prog rock provides. Out of the loose jams more and more concrete musical ideas developed, which ultimately led to their own pieces. Mother Turtle released three studio albums until this moment, their self titled debut studio album "Mother Turtle" in 2013, their second studio album titled "II" in 2016 and their third studio album titled "Zea Mice" in 2018. The second of these three albums is the one which will be the subject of this review.

So, "II" is the second studio album of Mother Turtle and was released in 2016. The line up on the album is Kostas Konstantinidis (lead and backing vocals, guitars, MiDi, ukulele and composer), Giorgos Theodoropoulos (keyboards), Babis Prodomidis (saxophone and flute), Alex Kiourntziadis (violin), George Filopelou (electric and fretless basses) and Giorgos Mpalats (backing vocals and drums). The album had also the participation of Alexandra Sieti (vocals) and Maria Mariadou (vocals), as guest's singers.

So, three years after their impressive homonymous debut, Mother Turtle released their second studio album, simply entitled "II". The band once again takes over the release, thus indicating the autonomy and determination to achieve their musical vision. Bolder than ever and with more experimentation this time, Mother Turtle shows us a renewed version of their sound, where the heavy and symphonic elements gives way to directions that refer more to the jazz "sensitivities" of the Canterbury scene. All musicians have now the time and space to unfold their own talents and improvisational ability and the significant additions to the band composition reinforce this commendable effort. "II" is a big step for the band, in the context of continuous improvement, both synthetic and executive, and could be an album with a timeless value and recognition in the progressive rock scene. Mother Turtle plays inspirational and adventurous prog rock with a rich sound, showing their vision and ambition. That is perfectly perceived by its very first listenings. "II" has six tracks. The opening "Overture", despite its short duration and minimalistic development nicely takes us aback by the repeated multiple vocals that bring to my mind similar moments of Gentle Giant. "Harvest Moon" is really a great track with clear influences of King Crimson and Van Der Graaf Generator. It also reminds me Discipline, at times. The saxophone and violin operate faultlessly, combined with the theatrical tone of the vocals. This is one of the best tracks I've listened to in the last years. "Ennui" sounds like an atmospheric evocation, an intense emotional moment where the flute and fretless bass make the piece hover. "Walpurgi Flame" is the lengthiest track. It's a truly adventurous piece with interesting changes and escalating tensions. The violin and saxophone duo gives a dramatic tone until a pretty delicate melodic "crust" is formed. The female vocals add some sensuality to the piece. "The Tower" comes to remember the terrible memories of September 11th. This is a very beautiful and power piece of music were the drumming work shows confidence and comfort linking the changes between the rhythm and musical themes. "The Art Of Ending A Revolution" is a melancholic piece that begins with optimism, where the contrast of emotions is identified and alternates with the singing of wind, string and electric guitar, until complete it with an exemplary climax in the end.

Conclusion: I think Mother Turtle has all the ingredients to be a great band. I must say that I was very impressed with their second studio album. In reality, Mother Turtle manage to meet all the expectations, thanks to the maturity, evolution and quality that can distinguish them. Perseverance, passion and extra experience are clearly here. It seems the band has a serious musical project very well structured that can measure the pulse of both, musically and lyrically. "II" is a choice that meets the ambitions of a band that filters out its influences and delivers a set of choreographed, mature and well crafted compositions. "II" has become truly beautiful, sometimes almost fragile, a retroprog album of a special kind. With this album, Mother Turtle proves they master very well the art of not giving up on to evolve on their music. This is an excellent conceptual album. The genre fans should be thrilled. The album gives to them a good way.

Prog is my Ferrari. Jem Godfrey (Frost*)

 Mother Turtle by MOTHER TURTLE album cover Studio Album, 2013
3.90 | 53 ratings

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Mother Turtle
Mother Turtle Heavy Prog

Review by VianaProghead
Prog Reviewer

4 stars Review Nº 253

The Greek prog scene, despite all odds, continues giving us remarkable albums. This is due to the talent, hard work and above all, the determination shown both by the musicians and the people behind the bands that strive to promote them inside and across borders. Mother Turtle is one of those bands. In the last five years they have managed to make a sensation from the start and have nothing to envy from many other similar bands and releases made outside of Greece.

The Greek band Mother Turtle was formed back in 2011, originally as a jam band using the moniker Hogweed. They decided to change their name to Mother Turtle sometimes in 2012, following the realization that they really wanted to create their own music based on common musical interests. 'Mother Turtle' is their self debut album released in 2013.

Their main features are the perfect balance between structured ideas and experimentation, the technical competence of their music that works in favor of emotion and the smart use of their influences through knowledge of the past decades. Certainly, they don't lack modern aesthetics and expression that gives a new perspective to the term neo-prog without coming as a surprise to the traditional enthusiasts. Mother Turtle's eponymous debut album was a welcoming proposal of a band, which from the very beginning showed a very special ability to mix sounds and influences of an extremely creative and endless music source. So, here we have the 70's unique aristocratic prog rock with no leaps and bounds.

So, 'Mother Turtle' is the eponymous debut studio album of Mother Turtle and was released in 2013. The line up on the album is Kostas Konstantinidis (lead and backing vocals and guitars), Giorgos Theodoropoulos (piano, synthesizers and sampling), Kostis Hasopoulos (bass and fretless bass) and Giorgos Mpalats (backing vocals and drums).

It seems to me that Mother Turtle is a band that has a fairly wide interest in music, and that they seek to incorporate as many of them as possible into their compositions. Their compositions are structurally fairly advanced and are pleasant enough overall to listen, with some fine individual sequences explored generally in a context that manage to maintain the tension well enough all over the album. The use of contrasting sequences gels in a good manner and the flow isn't disrupted. The abrupt transitions that sometimes come across, are logical to follow and don't break the momentum.

Their sound is an amalgam of influences from the classic era of the 70's, mostly relying on heavy prog and guitar rock. Basically, they explore similar landscapes as on the first compositions, with vintage symphonic progressive rock akin to the likes of Camel, alternating with harder edged guitar or guitar and organ driven sequences that at the most intense takes on qualities comparable to the likes of Deep Purple or Uriah Heep, with some vibrant passages that in elements used may be said to be a tad closer to the likes of Rush thrown in for good measure. The general impression is of a band rather form of progressive rock from the past, but also a band that may well incorporate some details here and there from a somewhat more contemporary context as well, gentler neo- progressive details of a classic Marillion style first and foremost. In addition there's room for some jazz tinged details here and there as well, used in good effects.

Of the seven pieces, all are worthwhile listens. All over the album we have the sense that, although the musicians are working really hard, they are also having real fun. The playing is intense. Personally I'd say that everything combines in just about a perfect manner. For instance, on the instrumental piece 'Rhinocerotic', the first half of the track is a brilliant run through engaging themes and arrangements. Still, despite the freneticism of the all track, the vocals retain a lightness that offsets the riotousness of the music. Striking this balance well, as the band has done, is quite a great achievement. The climax is perhaps closer with the last track 'Attic', which displays a bold, electric sound, myriad shifts in time and tone, and striking vocals. We can also say that the guitar playing on the tune, absolutely shines. Also intriguing is 'God Games', where particularly the beginning and end sections sound like a classic jam band music, with in-your-face guitar and driving drums, but the mid section includes a brief spoken, sometimes yelled, religious lecture.

Conclusion: The musicianship founded on this album is a mix of classic prog rock and is excellent throughout. There are catchy guitar leads, retro sounding keyboards, punchy bass, vigorous drumming and dramatic, melodious, and seemingly tongue in cheek vocals, which are sung without any Greek accent, at times, evoking Geddy Lee. These guys have musical chops, and they want you to know that. The harder edged progressive rock of a vintage variety will probably be the facet of Mother Turtle, which defines them most profoundly, but as far as specific style is concerned, there's probably just as much material here with stronger ties to gentler varieties of classic prog rock. If you imagine a band that picks bits and pieces from Uriah Heep, Deep Purple and Rush, and blends them into fairly sophisticated compositions with more of a Camel tinged direction, you should have an indication about what this album is all about.

Prog is my Ferrari. Jem Godfrey (Frost*)

 Zea Mice by MOTHER TURTLE album cover Studio Album, 2018
3.94 | 104 ratings

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Zea Mice
Mother Turtle Heavy Prog

Review by BrufordFreak
Collaborator Honorary Collaborator

4 stars After dropping the surprise bomb on me two years ago with their amazing "II"--a Top 10 Album of 2016 for me--I was super excited when Bandcamp notified me of this new release.

1. "Zea Mice part 1: Kukuruzu" (6:44) opens like a prog song with long-held buzzing solo synth and vocal samples from field recordings in Russian (?) before breaking into a hard-driving, engagingly-themed rocker. Reminds me of The D Project's "Shimmering Lights." Nice work from bass, drums, and saxophone. (8.5/10)

2. "Zea Mice part 1: #Cornhub" (8:06) solid foundational music over which several instrumentalists put on a great show: Alex Kiourntziadis' violin, Kostas Konstantinidis' acoustic and electric guitars, George Theodoropoulos' synths. I love the sound of George Baltas' metronomic snare! Marked down for being little more than a smooth jazz jam song. (9/10)

3. "Zea Mice part 2: Sea Mice" (6:53) a nice smooth jazz groove over which synths, electric guitar, and violin take turns at the fore. I like the violin solo and the tension of the final third the best. (8.75/10)

4. "Zea Mice part 2: Zeitenllik" (1:21) an ominous soundscape over which an obviously scary narration is performed . . . in Greek. (4/5)

5. "Zea Mice part 2: Vermins" (6:40) seems a continuation of "Sea Mice" with the same (or variation of the same) driving groove. The female vocalise of Elpida Papakosma range in sound from Ofra Haza's Persian "scatting" to Björkian Sugarcube-era sounds. Guitar and violin lead us into a thicker, faster section in the fifth minute. The final minute becomes more spacious and synthed, themed around a kind of James Bond riff. Nice tune. (9/10)

6. "Zea Mice part 2: Fourward" (1:57) North African drumming within which piano and synths sneak intermittent riffs. Cool! (4.5/5)

7. "Zea Mice part 3: Vermins (reprise)" (1:11) a stripped down, acoustic version of the Vermins theme? Pretty but I don't hear the similarity. (4.5/5)

8. "Zea Mice part 3: Nostos" (16:38) excellent hard-driving instrumental prog over a techno-synth rhythm track. The final third turns radically into some smoky lounge jazz. Excellent sound but . . . why? (9/10)

It's taken me a long, long time to get up to writing a review of this album--despite the fact that I've owned it for over half the year. There's just a lot of dense music--which is particularly challenging to critique with instrumental music. The quality of performances and "hooks" is high but I really miss the wonderful storytelling that the vocals and instruments did with the previous album.

4.5 stars; a near-masterpiece of instrumental progressive rock.

 Zea Mice by MOTHER TURTLE album cover Studio Album, 2018
3.94 | 104 ratings

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Zea Mice
Mother Turtle Heavy Prog

Review by rdtprog
Special Collaborator Heavy / RPI / Symphonic Prog Team

4 stars The band has evolved in a new direction with this new album which seems weird to consider them a Heavy Prog band. You will hear some space, psychedelic influences and still some jazz parts. They enjoy building their songs like a jam session slowly for most of their songs except for the first track and last one which has a frenetic pace that is more complex with many twists. The songs are developed with such simplicity that it easy to get you hooked in a kind of infectious groove where each instrument is seducing you, starting with the great drums and that heavy sounded bass As for the keyboards, they are still present in the background subtly in the Canterbury style. And what about the great guitar playing of Kostas Konstantinidis. The addition of some violin and sax to the drum/bass combo bring more textures to the overall sound of this brilliant album. I heard influences from bands like Djam Karet and Ozric Tentacles and a lot more in this album that is mostly instrumental. Recommended!
 Zea Mice by MOTHER TURTLE album cover Studio Album, 2018
3.94 | 104 ratings

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Zea Mice
Mother Turtle Heavy Prog

Review by mitarai_panda

5 stars Mother Turtle from Thessaloniki, Greece, established in 2011. The style is heavy avant-garde, which I personally consider to be one of the best avant-garde rock bands in Greece (hardly one). 16 years I was shocked 2 specifically ordered me hooked (but that is not heavy, more art). They were also influenced by rush, camel, genesis, FRANK ZAPPA, MARILLION, etc. and were also active in live performances. The orchestra successfully mixes symphonies, ballads, new avant-garde and heavy-duty elements. Although it is easier to distinguish between symphony and heavy type, the orchestra is still hard to classify because they have designed many fields and even I can hear in the new college The impact of electronics and free jazz. This new album "Zea Mice" can be considered to be their highest masterpiece so far, especially the opening three consecutive let me see through, completely immersed in the next round of ups and downs, heavy + psychedelic + Jazz really enough experience, nice but not greasy. Only the latter half of the album some weak, repeat themselves and not too amazing places, the last song is also quite satisfactory, which makes me slightly lower rating on it, but enough to give a 4.5 star score! Definitely this year's top ten powerful contenders!
 II by MOTHER TURTLE album cover Studio Album, 2016
3.91 | 66 ratings

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II
Mother Turtle Heavy Prog

Review by BrufordFreak
Collaborator Honorary Collaborator

5 stars Incredible eclectic prog from Greece. Each time I find myself listening to this album I am blown away by A) how good it is, B) how familiar it is, C) how diverse the styles represented here are, and D) how much it sounds like some long-lost 'classic' from the 1970s--like a new release of a heretofore undiscovered BABYLON tape.

1. "Overture" (1:46) acoustic ditty introducing the epic that follows performed in a kind of Renaissance-style vocal herald à la GENTLE GIANT. (9/10)

2. "Harvest Moon" (13:08) a song that sounds like it was left off a VAN DER GRAAF GENERATOR or KING CRIMSON album in the 1970s or perhaps a more recent DISCIPLINE/MATTHEW PARMENTER--only with a different vocalist. Great drumming, great keyboard work, great saxophone, great vocals, amazing ending! (10/10)

3. "Ennui" (3:31) a gentle yet insistent STYX/RUSH-like interlude between the album's twin towers. (8.5/10)

4. "Walpurgi Flame" (20:15) Like two songs in one: the first a eight-minute rendering of an amazing though long lost Zeuhl (GUAPO?) warm up, the second a contrasting gorgeous, hope-filled symphonic folk piece with female lead vocalists feeling similar to a CIRRUS BAY song (though it sounds more, in fact, like a song from Chile's AISLES' 2009 In Sudden Walks because of the incredible vocal melodies). Methinks the lyrics refer to the trouble a typical (or particular) Greek individual might have with his country (as well as his species') preoccupation with money and power when, at basic biological status, all are equal. My new favorite prog epic of the year 2016. (10/10)

5. "The Tower" (2:56) a beautiful and incredibly powerful tribute to the shock and confusion of the eye-witness observers of the destruction of New York City's Twin Towers on September 11, 2001. (10/10)

6. "The Art of Ending a Revolution" (14:44) is a decent if fairly bland and simple prog epic about the lesson humans are supposed to learn "the art of smiling while someone is stabbing your back," the art of practicing The Golden Rule, the art of patience with hope, the art of detachment. Nice electric guitar chord progressions, nice vocal, nice message, nice bass play, nice saxophone work--just a nice song. Nice. Like we're expected to be. Despite the chaos and corruption surrounding us. The best part of the song begins with the eery Twilight Zone-like synth over which David Strathairn reads Edward R. Murrow's famous anti-Eugene McCarthy speech from the 2005 film, Good Night, and Good Luck... and then the powerful final two minutes. (9/10)

This is one of the most brilliantly conceived and realized concept albums I've ever heard. I hope it gets the attention it deserves--both musically and moral-politically.

A true masterpiece of progressive rock music and an album that should be heard around the world--especially in times like these.

 Mother Turtle by MOTHER TURTLE album cover Studio Album, 2013
3.90 | 53 ratings

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Mother Turtle
Mother Turtle Heavy Prog

Review by Windhawk
Special Collaborator Honorary Collaborator

4 stars Greek band MOTHER TURTLE was formed back in 2011, originally as a jam band, using the moniker Hogweed. They decided to change their name to Mother Turtle sometime in 2012, following the realization that they really wanted to create their own music, based on common musical interests. "Mother Turtle" is their debut album, self-released in 2013.

Harder edged progressive rock of a vintage variety will probably be the facet of this band that defines them most profoundly, but as far as specific style is concerned, there's probably just as much material here with stronger ties to gentler varieties of classic progressive rock, with a band like Camel one that frequently came to mind. If you can imagine a band that picks bits and pieces from Uriah Heep, Deep Purple and Rush, and blends them into fairly sophisticated compositions with more of a Camel-tinged direction, you should have an indication about what this album is all about. If that sounds interesting, you might want to give this one a spin.

 Mother Turtle by MOTHER TURTLE album cover Studio Album, 2013
3.90 | 53 ratings

BUY
Mother Turtle
Mother Turtle Heavy Prog

Review by aapatsos
Special Collaborator Prog Metal and Heavy Prog Teams

3 stars A very honest and well-worked album, Mother Turtle's self-titled debut comes to add to the impressive releases from Greece in 2013 and is currently available as a "pay-as-you-wish" option from their bandcamp page.

Their sound is an amalgam of influences from the 70's, mostly relying on heavy prog and guitar rock as confirmed by the impressive opener "707" with characteristic and memorable guitar phrases, resembling to Uriah Heep (Byron era) and Greek legends Socrates Drank the Conium. Not less interesting are the more obscure moments found in "Mother Turtle And The Evil Mushroom part 1" and "Rhinocerotic", especially the latter showing an affection towards King Crimson. Often the heavier moods intertwine with mellower and jazzier passages, in the vein of Fusion Orchestra (the more adventurous) and VDGG (the more eclectic). References to more contemporary acts such as Black Bonzo can also be found on the highlight "God Games" and folksy passages find their way via the "Bridge".

Although the production is not crystal clear and the accented vocals could be improved so that Mother Turtle can make the next big step, this debut is very promising and dynamic, revealing high levels of musicianship, skill and taste.

Watch out for that Mother Turtle! 3.5 stars deserved.

Thanks to aapatsos for the artist addition. and to Quinino for the last updates

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