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Os Mundi - Latin Mass  CD (album) cover

LATIN MASS

Os Mundi

 

Eclectic Prog

3.75 | 20 ratings

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Ricochet
Special Collaborator
Honorary Collaborator
4 stars Largely accepted as kraut-rock (in a fresh and early phase of moving from the psychedelic to the acid taste and dandle rough motion), psychedelic (as a trench of concept and a bland of rock over sensations, in the usual psychotic and novelized ways) and rock (by slow motions that will grant a fine progressive impression or a chant beneath the waves and the inner trend), Os Mundi impress artistically and also share a common taste for the ravishing progressive passion, in a mixture that, mostly, is indescribably a great taste and a depth and darkness' more refined search, and stands afterwards as the bits of caprices and melted down orientations that, in classic time, have all the best originality but also dry an exclusive music.

Upon a few other such influences (bands that, enlarged in their century's experiment or chaos) , Os Mundi decided to have a debut of mass improvisation, acid dynamics and irregular means - subtly, this would also count as the more impressive manner of them ever composing and producing a dream and a musical ideal; they never quite gather themselves up anymore, or like so, upon the second album - taking a latin mass ceremony, with all the essential and characteristic elements (something run in the concept, not that sure how well and integrally in the music), and making a rock extravaganza, with moments of art and depression, of sobrieties of cluster and cringe, with music or nude sounds, with a concept vigilance or a mad claustrophobia, down the more spiced psychedelic or the more searched idea of a bombastic dark and humid recording. The idea of a masked profoundness is the only thing not up to the psychedelic smoke or the kraut vogue. Otherwise, the band has a meaningful, old-sound, eclectic and poly-rock arranged art rotation.

The more "choral" and "incanting" pieces prove sensibility and sound harvest, like the Overture, full of glows and organ parallels, merging hard and heavy on ritual-esque and subtle, like Credo being a piece for the hopes of vocals and sound-words, or like Sanctus, made in a typical language, but also blending massively and integrally vibrations of flute and rock-rhythm moody improvisation. The rest of the pieces do expand to more rock and more deloused symbols (for the "latin mass"), exciting by the peculiar and distinct psych, free-jazz, hard rock or tenacious abstract. Kyrie and Agnus Dei are quite the most dark and ambiguous examples, preaching over a dark atmosphere, scabrous (mildly, the really rough or desolating art is never reached in this state) vocals or riffs out of their infinity, in a sinister kind of rock or a very impressive high spirit. There are little mistakes or paranoid moments of interpretation in this album, it can just get a slim and over-droned essence if the taste, quite clearly, would not be to keen on acid rock and concept movement.

In Os Mundi's Latin Mass, the great lead of music perspective and special sound are given by Christoph Burse, less by the arrhythmic verses, but more by the mute taste of sound and color-explosion, and Udo Arndt, through the keyboards and organ addicted mind-drive, something of a sheer taste and caliber, compared to music being an illustration of psychic harms and musical ubiquities. Nevertheless, good (though occasional) woodwind work (either jazzy, or phosphorescently easy) by Dietrich Markgraf and, integrally, a fine interpretation of some special characters and some abyssal daises.

An impressive and marking debut album by Os Mundi, with a rough moment of progressive rock awaking from the psychedelic infinity of expression. Thinking that music should be an art moment or a special significance, this album (and not the more "relaxed" next one) should really be of interest. The other way around, this would be seriously against all the general trend and the moody vibes of rock and psych; having therefore a star off, thanks to pretentiousness and auricular creativity. But it feels better on the first side. Three point five stars.

Ricochet | 4/5 |

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