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Favni (Fauns) - Awaiting the Sun CD (album) cover

AWAITING THE SUN

Favni (Fauns)

 

Prog Folk

4.35 | 8 ratings

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BrufordFreak
5 stars Awaiting the Sun is a folk-based prog album on the scale of ANTHONY PHILLIPS' The Geese and The Ghost.

1. "Scenes From A Dream" (6:30) begins with a delicate weave of multiple absolutely heart- wrenching melodies coming from harmonizing vocalists, wooden flute, acoustic guitars, electric guitar. A middle section of full out electrified rock music similar to early GENESIS momentarily disrupts this bucolic bliss, but the pastoral feel returns to play out to the end with a piano, fretless bass and heavily distorted electric guitar lead weaving the baseline melody from the starting section. (10/10)

2. "Every Wave Its Prey" (4:43) with its SMITHS sound and crashing spacey middle and end sections (8/10)

3. "The Path" (10:10) denotes a return to the ANT PHILLIPS/STEVE HACKETT Voyage of the Acolyte guitar sounds but this one incorporates the alluring vocal talents of violin/flutist Kirsten Middeke. (9/10)

4. "Way To The Sun" (4:56) opens with a STEVEN WILSON-like acoustic guitar strum before being joined by flute, bass and drums. Again we are graced with the presence of the ethereal voice of Ms. Middeke. The SW comparisons continue though an AL STEWART "Infinity" familiarity emerges as the song plays out. (8/10) 5. "A Perfect Place" (10:45) begins with cymbal play, TONY LEVIN-like Chapmanstick play and piano before electric guitar and rock drumming join in (and take over). The song establishes quite a heavy Crimsonian sound with its interwoven arpeggios coming from several distorted electric instruments. By the time the MORRISSEY-like vocal enters the group weave has settled back into the realm of the near acoustic, but, for the chorus parts, the metal-like guitar chord strums return. (8/10)

6. "The Path (Reprise)" (1:49) reprises the chords and melodies from the acoustic parts of 3. "The Path." (9/10)

7. "Dawn" (20:24) finds the band again returning to the GENESIS/STEVE HACKETT/ ANTHONY PHILLIPS realm of pastoral acoustic music. The harmonized voices of a male and a female present the very folk-like melody and lyric lines. At 5:00 a very familiar GENESIS "Cinema Show"-like instrumental section begins; three minutes of absolutely gorgeous music. In the beginning of the ninth minute the Genesis influences continue with an uptempo shift into a full-out rock section with first organ, then flute, then electric guitar playing their solos. Choral chanting fills a brief section before the early ANT PHILLIPS--sounding electric guitar screams through a brief "Knife"-like solo. At the start of the twelfth minute everything shifts to a more RPI folk sound--acoustic guitar strummed and banged for percussive effect eventually turning into a very ANT PHILIPS Geese and the Ghost-like song. The transition from here into a military percussive build-to-crescendo section using a single acoustic guitar's arpeggiated descending chord sequence is so beautiful and so CELESTE/PREMIATA FORNERIA MARCONI. Truly one of the best prog epics to ever come out of the Prog Folk sub genre! (10/10)

A gorgeous album of more prog rock-leaning Prog Folk. The pastoral epic "Dawn" alone is worth giving this album a listen. Truly a classic!

BrufordFreak | 5/5 |

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