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Iron Maiden - Seventh Son Of A Seventh Son CD (album) cover

SEVENTH SON OF A SEVENTH SON

Iron Maiden

 

Prog Related

4.20 | 553 ratings

From Progarchives.com, the ultimate progressive rock music website

Flucktrot
Prog Reviewer
4 stars Maiden really are doing progressive metal here--something that wasn't immediately apparent. However, while other former metal tunes (Judas Priest, for example) get stale and cliche very quickly, I am really surprised about how often I come back to this one. In addition, it's always different features that grab my attention: a new appreciation for a well-worded lyric, an impressive baseline, cool guitar harmonies, and of course Dickinson's over-the-top vocal interpretations. I even love the cover: cartoon skulls and body parts with a gruesomeness worthy of metal, yet landscapes somewhat similar to Roger Dean-scapes.

Moonchild. Cool intro quickly introducing the theme, which wastes no time in starting a fist-pumping synth/power chord section, and then away we go with a killer metal tune. Great solo toward the end, and I always smile at Dickinson's meniacal laugh.

Infinite Dreams. No doubt this one is progressive as well. A restrained intro is a bit deceiving: this song has plenty of rock, with a ton of melodies and tempos packed into six minutes. Great stuff!

Can I Play with Madness, The Evil that Men Do. You know, a little bit of eighties excess isn't all bad. Although somewhat formulaic and cliche, these are very enjoyable songs that serve to lighten up the album a little (not considering lyrical content though).

Seventh Son of a Seventh Son. The rest of the album may have taken a while for me to fully appreciate, but this one grabbed me right away. A simple yet catchy metal crunch and probably a bit too enthusiastic vocals set up a truly inspired final six minutes. Creepy basslines, vocal synths and spoken word build perfectly to an expertly choreographed jam to close the track. About as good as prog metal gets for me!

The Prophecy, The Clairvoyant, Only the Good Die Young. Three rockers that each have unique progressive elements that make meaningful and diverse contributions to the album, whether it's a surprisingly tasteful acoustic fadeout (The Prophecy), a killer opening bassline (The Clairvoyant), or the reprise from the opener to finish the album (Only the Good Die Young).

In short, these guys have created a masterpiece because they have successfully incorporated enough diversity in sounds and styles, while still offering plenty of what they do best, which is in-your-face rock. Cohesive, fun, and energetic.

Flucktrot | 4/5 |

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