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The Nice - Keith Emerson With The Nice CD (album) cover

KEITH EMERSON WITH THE NICE

The Nice

 

Symphonic Prog

3.88 | 20 ratings

From Progarchives.com, the ultimate progressive rock music website

No Quarter Given 2.0
5 stars One day, as I wandered aimlessly through the shadowy corridors of a music store that had survived the zombie apocalypse, my hand carelessly came to rest on a CD box, that, from all evidence, was very old. The out-of-focus cover picture only added to the other trace indicators of age (dusty, handled, multiple sale stickers). But I did not push it aside. The artist name on the cover brought back memories of the heady days of TARKUS and BRAIN SALAD SURGERY. What was the other name mentioned ... "THE NICE"? I struggled to remember the scattered voices I had heard many decades earlier and what they had actually said. I remembered "GOOD" and "TRY IT". But in those years long past there was a lot of new, and exciting music that needed to be explored.

Now is a different age. The old icons of Prog are long dormant if not completely silent. The CD in my hand started to create a longing for the old carefree days when Progressive rock ruled the music store aisles. The gravitas of that style had even caused Led Zeppelin to issue Houses of the Holy - therein contained the singular most important song of the Progressive rock age - NO QUARTER. I could not see getting back to my home at Bag End fast enough and flip the CD in my computer, download it into iTunes and hear it on my iPod.

It is important to have a clear understanding that I am not one who is easily impressed, and my first hearing of KEITH EMERSON with The Nice was not impressive. But, many things did capture my attention. Why did a Bob Dylan song (with no Folksy stylings) stay in my head. Also, the vocalist, who seemed to bring to mind a rustic, pastoral setting fronting a "rock" band. Plus the nearest thing to a lullaby - "Hang On To A Dream" - I had heard in a long time, caused me to want to press replay (which I had not done since Peter Gabriel I).

Obviously there were astounding goings on. This CD in many ways seemed more like ELP than the real ELP. Things meshed together - classical, rock, jazz, all keyboards, guitars and vocals. Mr. Emerson was not kidding around. He had seen the future in 1967 and it was Progressive music. During the next three or four albums the band set about setting down the infrastructure and boundaries of Classical Rock. They really dropped the big one. The war was over before it started and The Nice were the rulers of the Progressive Rock Universe (nay the creators of Classical Rock). It has taken this long for me to see the light. Arrive at the fact that all of the tired dinosaurs or Art Rock are only the offspring of The Nice and mere reflections of the one true Prog band.

Let this be my first epistle: Romans, Corinthians, Thessalonians, cast aside your golden calf and other false idols. Follow the one true path to aural inspiration. The Nice is the band that will lead you to the promised land only hinted at during the 1960s and KEITH EMERSON with The Nice is the gateway entrance to the lands of milk and honey. The rest of their catalog is an adventure waiting for you. Take your time, enjoy - ye who read are saved.

PRIMITIVE. PASTORAL. RUSTIC

FRESH. PURE. CLEAN.

No Quarter Given 2.0 | 5/5 |

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