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Rush - Caress Of Steel CD (album) cover

CARESS OF STEEL

Rush

 

Heavy Prog

3.54 | 1205 ratings

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apps79
Special Collaborator
Honorary Collaborator
4 stars A very unique band in progressive rock history,RUSH were formed in Toronto,Canada in 1968.They begun as a classic hard rock band,as we meet them in their eponymous debut in 1974.Soon after original drummer John Rutsey would quit to be replaced by talented drummer/lyricist Neil Part.In 1975 the album ''Fly by night'' featured some slightly more complicated arrangements,but still their style can be characterized as LED ZEPPELLIN-influenced bluesy hard rock.Their third release ''Caress of steel'' was the big turn for RUSH.The album starts with three amazing mid-length tracks,featuring the well-known bluesy/hard rock of mid-70's RUSH...but it contained two epic tracks,clocking at over 12 and 19 min. respectively.These tracks contain some very interesting instrumental sections,a more complicated style of rock and lots of changing climates,based mainly on the great guitar work of Alex Lifeson and the familiar vocal lines of Geddy Lee.The turn of the sound of RUSH was a fact and ''Caress of steel'' might be the most important album in RUSH' history,as from this point on they would add tons of progressive elements in their music.A strongly recommended record!
apps79 | 4/5 |

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