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Pole - Inside The Dream CD (album) cover

INSIDE THE DREAM

Pole

 

Progressive Electronic

5.00 | 1 ratings

From Progarchives.com, the ultimate progressive rock music website

siLLy puPPy
5 stars After setting up his PÔLE record label, Paul Putti released his first album "Kotrill" as an artist collective also called PÔLE. His second release INSIDE THE DREAM once again featured Putti on synthesizers but a new cast of members was included and therefore a completely different sound and feel are present with little resemblance between the two LPs. While both albums are steeped in subtle creeping synth-laden soundscapes with alienating counterpoints in sound experimentation, INSIDE THE DREAM is the much more accessible of the two releases and expands the instrumentation beyond the electronica and adds acoustic guitar, bass and even electric lead guitar. Like "Kotrill" there are two long sprawling tracks that cover most of the album and one other that is dwarfed in their wake. While Putti is once again the leader on INSIDE THE DREAM, he is joined by Jean-Louis Rizet and although i'm not sold in the actual classification of a third album supposedly carried to torch to create a 3rd PÔLE album under the Besomebes- Rizet moniker. And just to make it all the more confusing released an album titled PÔLE! Now how's that for avant-garde?

"Inside The Dream" (25:00) begins with an acoustic guitar softly strumming pleasant folky chord progressions with a little chirping in the background and as the guitar slowly fades into prominence a little synthesized atmosphere begins peeking through the folk- laden soundscape and then something completely absent from "Kotrill" emerges - vocals! While the acoustic folk melody loops around the key chord structures an oscillating electronic sound vigorously vibrates behind it before exiting the picture. Another different melodic synth line takes its place. After a while the hypnotic acoustic begins to bring early Pink Floyd to mind with the soft sensual psychedelic folk of tracks like "If" from Atom Heart Mother. While one would think that the repetitive nature of the undulating folk would become stagnate, the subtle electronic effects keep things changing up just enough to keep the whole thing flowing and then about half way through the acoustic guitar takes a back seat and avant-garde electronic oscillations sound like interdimensional beings reprogramming the space-time continuum to insert secret messages from the other side. After they subside the acoustic guitar chord sequences shift gear. After a while the guitar and electronica trade off in free form style in completely unpredictable ways. Toward the end a percussive drive emerges as a glissando guitar sliding action takes over. A bass also joins the party making this a full-fledged melody! Welcome to tripper's paradise!

"Outside The Nightmare" (15:00) takes a completely different approach and begins with a pulsating electronic sound that cedes to a less structured buzzing sound. Get the folk outa here and let the freakery unfurl! This one is much more free form but the certain aspects continue to peek in and out of the random parade of sound. As the track progresses more layers of sound pile up creating a smorgasbord tapestry of electronic embellishments. While a drone layer slowly changes its pitch, a more percussive drive drips forth and swooshing effects sweep around like a random plastic bag circling the city streets on a windy day occasionally becoming trapped in sonic eddies. A slightly X-files type of alien music creeps in with tinkling keys that truly sound totally out there. This is exactly the type of music i imagine when i think of ETs making contact and taking us to their galactic jukebox for their chill time! As if all those freakery weren't enough, it continues with what sounds like psychedelic sirens engaged in a choir of shrill utterings juxtaposed into alien musical scales. This is certainly one of the weirdest and most satisfying electronic experiments i've ever heard although this one does bring Berlin School tripsters Klaus Schulze, Cluster or Tangerine Dream to mind although in their most adventurous undertakings!

"In The Maelstrom" (5:00) is more a rhythmic affair that has a steady Krautrock beat as heard from Kraftwerk or Neu! although the synthesizers are layered to create a dense tapestry of counterpoint melodies. The sounds are dark and brooding but deliver a steady rhythmic drive with key changes in the melody at regular intervals.

While INSIDE THE DREAM is not nearly as alienating or shocking as "Kotrill" it is also a perfectly paced album. Generally speaking, the two PÔLE albums will appeal to two different spectrums of the adventurous music seekers. "Kotrill" will thrill lovers of chaos, noise, free form and the utterly alienating whereas INSIDE THE DREAM will please those who love the progressive electronic sound when accompanied by some sort of traditional music structure. This one is much more based in melodic developments and never strays far from steady percussive drives. Personally i find both sides of the spectrum equally exhilarating and i cannot find one flaw in either of the PÔLE albums. To me they released the perfect pair of super cool experimental music and look forward to the day when they finally get the attention they deserve and are re-released for a new modern world of tripsters.

siLLy puPPy | 5/5 |

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