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Pat Metheny - Imaginary Day CD (album) cover

IMAGINARY DAY

Pat Metheny

 

Jazz Rock/Fusion

4.00 | 59 ratings

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The Quiet One
Prog Reviewer
4 stars Imagine a day when Pat Metheny becomes Eclectic:

Imaginary Day is definitely one of Metheny's most eclectic and complete albums, emphasizing a good mix of genres through his unique acoustic/electric guitar sound with the addition of some musicians, besides the classic line-up of Lyle(acoustic piano and keyboards), Steve(acoustic and electric bass) and Paul(drums), there's Mark Ledford on vocals, trumpet, flugerhorn and bass trumpet, David Blamires on vocals, mellophone, baritone, baritone acoustic guitar, electric guitar, violin, recorder and trumpet, and then you got Mino, David(Samuels), Glen and Don on percussion.

The album opens up with the title track. An extraordinary 10 minute piece that opens up in the style of Indo-Prog/Raga Rock sub-genre of here. The song evolves beautifuly to the classic Metheny style, with a wonderful electric guitar solo leading the second half of the tune till it finishes.

The album continues with Follow Me, an up-beat acoustic tune with Pat's typical synth guitar solo, as well as some subtle piano in the end with some percussion, giving it a samba/jazz feel to it.

The track that follows is Into the Dream. Pat's acoustic guitar leads this song, as Imaginary Day, this one also has a Indo-Prog/Raga Rock feel. However, Into the Dream is really just an opener to the next song, A Story Within a Story, a much jazzier oriented instrumental, but still the bass and piano gives it a samba feel to it. Besides having another promising electric guitar solo, it has at the end an emotional trumpet solo.

You think that the Indo-Prog/Raga Rock influence is just for those tunes, well get prepared for the stunning acoustic and percussive intro of The Heat of the Day. It then evolves to classic Metheny jazzy style, which in here Lyle gets the chance to shine with his wonderful and unique piano, and then Pat delivers a magnificent, as always, synth guitar solo.

To lower your pulse, Pat delivers you the gentle acoustic tune called Across the Sky, with some powerful yet subtle piano and guitar chords.

Prepare to be shocked with The Roots of Coincidence, with an electronic intro and some petrifying electric guitar you now know that Pat is unpredictable. The song also carries an excellent guitar solo with the fast electronic intro as the rhythm. The last minutes of the tune are soft, yet dark, with acoustic guitar and keyboards.

Next stop, To Soon Tomorrow, another soft acoustic song as Across the Sky, but in a more jazzy rhythm.

The album ends with the wonderful The Awakening, with the celtic-esque intro to the jazzy middle part with Lyle's piano having the lead. Finally the tune and the album finishes with Pat's everlasting acoustic guitar fading away gently.

Such a fantastic album, which carries through jazz to frantic electronic rythms to samba and even celtic style. This album is a proof that Pat can really progress from his classic, yet amazing, jazz fusion stlye of the 80's to an eclectic style which has some very promising compositions.

4 stars: Recomended for those who want a more varied version of Jazz Fusion, which really fuses much more than just rock or funk with jazz.

The Quiet One | 4/5 |

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