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Celeste - Principe di un Giorno CD (album) cover

PRINCIPE DI UN GIORNO

Celeste

 

Rock Progressivo Italiano

4.14 | 199 ratings

From Progarchives.com, the ultimate progressive rock music website

tszirmay
Special Collaborator
Crossover Team
5 stars

Talk about a perfect title, an all white album (just like the Beatles dared!) and just to confuse matters a bit more; a mellotron-sated pastoral Italian School of Progressive classic to boot (the shape of Italy from way up in satellite land!). While many boldly orate about RDM, Banco, Le Orme, PFM , Museo Rosenbach and company, this little fragile gem continues to dazzle, proving that there are fundamental reasons why most Italians cook so fabulously! They know how to combine natural products so well: juicy and ripe tomatoes, crisp and crunchy red onions, grandiose acidy capers and the most delectable cheese you can think of. Put them all together, a little salt and pepper, then a sprig of fresh basil and Ecco il Paradiso! On "Principe di Giorno" the musicians emulate their mammas in the cucina by adding magical flute, divine acoustic guitar and heavenly blasts from the ubiquitous Mellotron, plus an occasional dash of gentle choir, church organ and those trembling vocals that have inspired many for centuries. This is true music genius, a medicating journey of unfettered bliss, a mature expression of celestial inspiration, placid introspection and dreamy Sunday morning relaxation. That this superlative disc offers genuine panacea is uncontestable as one would be hard pressed to find fault with such splendor. Even the hard rockers need to rest their head banging carcasses on occasion! That there are powerful early King Crimson influences in attendance here should come as no surprise, as Italy was surely one of the first countries to openly embrace the liquid beauty of progressive rock, inspiring a rich musical culture that could add its own folk/classical aromas without too much of a hardship. Hence, an entire arsenal of instruments are presented here, with everything from xylophones, saxes, violins, flutes, assorted percussive implements, blending superbly with the majestic piano, the grinding mellotron (and its local derivative, the Eminent),some electric piano as well as some synths (the good old ARP 2600). The amazing tracks really do not deserve to be served up individually since they form nothing more than an elegant suite of songs that have a continuity that contributes grandly to the overall impression. I cannot help smirking at the oft repeated thought that this may put you asleep, because elevator muzak this is definitely not. It is not inconspicuous, boring, dull or even repetitive. In fact, the finale "L'Imbroglio" even offers up playfulness and humor. It just needs a special time and place for it to be enjoyed properly, like after a rowdy night out drinking, flirting and carousing with your social cronies, nothing is better than this to crash on the sofa and crank up the volume. But it can also be an inspiration to make passionate love to a bella ragazza (or your wife!) and ultimately , a great choice on a Sunday morning between Ant Phillips' Slowdance and Iona's Open Sky, a tasty frittata brunch waiting on the patio , as the birds dance to the sights and sounds of peaceful harmony. This is not just music, its medicine! An absolute necessity in any prog collection worthy of "envergure" (French for depth). This is dedicated to Raff and Micky! I can only imagine them listening to this ! 5 passionate bravos.

tszirmay | 5/5 |

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