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Osiris - Osiris CD (album) cover

OSIRIS

Osiris

 

Neo-Prog

3.90 | 66 ratings

From Progarchives.com, the ultimate progressive rock music website

GruvanDahlman
4 stars I cannot claim to be an expert on arabian progressive rock. Yet one of my all time favorite albums hail from the region. Osiris originate from Bahrain and seems, by all accounts, to be the only prog band from this country. That might be a shame but since Osiris is such a potent and formidable force I'd rather say "Praise the lord they're here" than wish for a plethora of bands.

The band hail from an illustrious past that meant playing western styled rock in a slight progressive vein, gigging all over Bahrain, but it wasn't until 1980/1981 that the band formed themselves as Osiris, after some members of the earlier incantations returned from studies abroad. By now they focused entirely on progressive rock. Yet again in a western styled manner but adding touches of arabian tastes and smells. That mixture results in a Genesis-ian or Camel-ian concoction of arabian influenced progressive rock. Quite a blend and a thrilling listen. The tracks range in duration from the 4 minutes long "Paradox in A major" to the lenghty (11+ minutes) and very fantastically titled "Sailor on the seas of fate".

Soundwise you're served quite a moody piece of prog. There are, as previously mentioned, many references to Gabriel styled Genesis or Camel and those two bands will give you an idea of what to expect. But Osiris aren't a carbon copy of those bands. Rather they form the base on what is then built a magnificent tower of prog that differs. The arabian styled elements, though not overwhelming, are there and gives you a different sensation. You could also expect a lot of vintage keyboards and syntesizers that gives the album a very lush and embracing sensation. It's not all about being lush, though. You get several bursts of harder sounds aswell with distorted guitars. The vocals are very pleasant and fits the music to a T. The recording is not soundwise the best, so there is something to have wished for but that does not detract my attention from the power and beauty within.

The best tracks on the album is surely "Sailor on the seas of fate". The fact that it's the longest track isn't the only reason for this. It's just that it is so elegantly built around the western and arabian styled elements and is like a bite of everything they stand for and are capable of. "Atmun" is another of those great tracks. This time more spacey and I get a slight feeling of Hawkwinds more etherial and ambient material around the same time. I love "Embers of a flame". Such a great track. The electric piano acts like stars in the heavens and the ditorted guitars gets you on your toes. The ending "Paradox in A major" reminds me of Kansas a bit, though decideldy more middle eastern in approach. The songs not mentioned are not disregarded or inferior in any way. I could listen to any and all of the songs on this album and find myself to be ridicilously, hopelessly in love.

Osiris first album is a wonderful piece of progressive art. Hastily recorded with an inferior sounding product the glory of the material shines through. I have loved this album for more than a decade, must be coming on 15 years now, and everytime I listen to it I find myself to be in the most spirited moods wondering why I don't listen to it everyday. A great album with only minor flaws that needs to be discovered by more people.

GruvanDahlman | 4/5 |

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