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Santana - Lotus CD (album) cover

LOTUS

Santana

 

Jazz Rock/Fusion

3.84 | 113 ratings

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sgtpepper
5 stars This is simply one of the best rock/jazz-rock/fusion live albums of the 70's. All musicians are in top shape, tightly playing, inventive and willing to take extra mile to please listeners. The sound quality is phenomenal for the 70's.

The choice of compositions can be considered as best of Santana from the first classic era (all four hits from the second album) as well es more challenging instrumental music.

While the first half keeps things more down to earth(apart from "Every step of the way" and until the last couple of recent short fusion tracks), the second half of the album digs deeply into Latin fusion sophistication introduced by perfect bass/drum driven expirental and hypnotic "Mantra", Drum soloing in "Kyoto" that slowly evolve into the pinnacle "Incident at Neshabur" that sums up the instrumental prowess in mere 16 minutes. Absolutely breathtaking and there is no resting at laurels with "Samba Pa Ti" and "Toussaint l'Overture".

Although this album clocks at almost two hours, it is filled with excitement, innovation, progression and quality in every single minute of it. A must have for any Santana fan and also serves as a good introduction point to illustrious career of the band.

sgtpepper | 5/5 |

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