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Maudlin Of The Well - Part the Second CD (album) cover

PART THE SECOND

Maudlin Of The Well

 

Experimental/Post Metal

4.22 | 527 ratings

From Progarchives.com, the ultimate progressive rock music website

EatThatPhonebook
Prog Reviewer
5 stars 9/10

"Part The Second" is a masterpiece of modern progressive rock.

New sound? Or maybe it's just a parenthesis, even though it's less possible, since Toby Driver has been experimenting a lot with Kayo Dot and with his solo project, and it doesn't look like he wants to back to his origins any time soon. After eight years of waiting for another masterpiece, here comes "Part The Second", possibly one of the best progressive rock albums ever made. Totally unexpected, "Part The Second" is the first non metal album by motw, and hopefully, like the title of the album would suggest, the album that will start a second period for the band. Actually, this isn't quite a new album, or at least this isn't new material: the songs were written back in 1997, before the band's debut was released. So maybe this IS Driver's true sound. The style is very close to Avant Prog, mixed with some jazz, classical, chamber music, rock, and a tiny bit of metal. This is all very different from the death metal/ avant garde metal band that rose at the beginning of the century. That is one of the main reasons why "Part The Second' blew me and many others away.

"Excerpt From ..." is an epic, ten minute song, beautiful and extremely relaxing. There are a few passages here that really prove how the band has changed and at the same time has maintained some typical characteristics. The use of violin is massive, but also guitars, accompanied by creepy vocals by Driver. Fabulous song.

"Another Excerpt" is a little less relaxing, a little more creepy. It is only 5 minutes long, but it is very well structured: the first two minutes are more post rock than anything else, with a slight increasing climax, and when three minutes pass the song starts, with some flangered vocals and tense atmosphere. It seems like the song will explode, but it never does, just like some moments in the previous song.

"Rose Quartz..." is the most chamber music influenced song off the album, and as a consequence it is one of the most interesting songs of the decade.Three quarters of the song is instrumental, and when half time arrives, there is a part where only the violin plays, making it very tense. After a while we start hearing some half growls half laments, until the song turns into a Pink Floydish atmosphere with Roger Water like vocals. This song never seizes to amaze me.

"Clover Garland Island" is another weird song, a little closer to rock, but still more post rock, especially the mysterious chorus. We have some beautiful and delicate moments here as well as jazzy moods and suspended and tense guitar riffs, like the first part of the song.

"Laboratories Of The Invisible World" is considered motw's finest song, for it's length ( almost twelve minutes) and for it's moods that seem to revisit the old motw sound. It does have some unbelievably good moments and fine passages that will surely go down in history as one of motw's best songs ever.

In conclusion, after listening to the entire album, you will be mind blown, guaranteed. An essential masterpiece that will surely go down in history for it's brave experimentation and for it's stunning moments of beauty.

EatThatPhonebook | 5/5 |

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