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Uriah Heep - Electrically Driven  CD (album) cover

ELECTRICALLY DRIVEN

Uriah Heep

 

Heavy Prog

3.88 | 14 ratings

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Muzikman
Prog Reviewer
4 stars I haven't heard a live Uriah Heep album since one of the best live recordings ever was released by the group back in 1973. Live set the standard for unprecedented successes in live recordings such as Frampton Comes Alive. For those of you too young to remember, Uriah Heep was a progressive-rock band of the highest order for many years. They are going through an enjoyable phase of their long and successful career right now. Interest in their history has been renewed with a series of remastered back catalog recordings (Sanctuary/Castle) and special live events in the U.K. The only remaining original members are co-founder Mick Box (guitar) and Lee Kerslake (drums). Box founded the group with now deceased lead singer David Byron. Some thirty members have come and gone since their inception, and they have survived all the changes to bring you new material and an exciting new live recording. The group's album cover art is always recognizable. Roger Dean (Yes covers) is the man that makes the fantasy science fiction scenes so memorable. Demons And Wizards and The Magician's Birthday are the albums that always come to mind for some of the more colorful, thought provoking, and graphically intense images.

All the excitement and wonderment of youth came rushing back to me in an instant as they kick things off with "Return To Fantasy," then its followed by a raucous and rocking "Bird Of Prey." Bernie Shaw fits in well with the scheme of things, he sounds like a true-to-form Uriah Heep vocalist reminiscent of David Byron. Shaw introduces their latest single "Come Away Melinda," which I thought was a little too soft and top forty for these old rockers. [Um, well, it was originally released in 1970 on Very 'Eavy, Very 'Umble (or Uriah Heep in the US) - ed.] "Gypsy", "Sunrise", and "July Morning" are real keepers. Those three tracks were my personal favorites of the electric set. It's vintage early Heep at its very best. The court jester Ian Anderson shows up on both sets to add his famous flute sounds to the mix for a short time, giving the crowd a burst of his charm and enchantment, which only adds to the magic of the performances. Mick Box remains the ever present anchor of the group. He still has what it takes to rock after all these years, and he serves as an example to younger musicians how you can have a long and successful career and survive it quite nicely without overdosing or killing yourself.

The disc has a nice steady flow with a gradual momentum that reaches its peak towards the end of the show. I can't say enough how much I enjoyed this set. It reminded me of how important this group was to me when I was a teenager. They were one of the first bands that planted the seed that continues to grow and blossom to this day. Uriah Heep is one of the original British prog-rockers that became as important and influential as Yes, the proof is on this CD. Long live rock and roll!

Muzikman | 4/5 |

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