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Schicke Fuhrs & Frohling - Sunburst CD (album) cover

SUNBURST

Schicke Fuhrs & Frohling

 

Symphonic Prog

3.49 | 46 ratings

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Cesar Inca
Special Collaborator
Honorary Collaborator
4 stars After a terrific beginning with "Symphonic Pictures", its follow-up "Sunburst" placed itself in the demanding position of showing what SFF had to offer next to the prog audience. and it did a brilliant work at it! Being a bit less intense than its predecessor, "Sunburst" is a proof that SFF was still capable of sowing and reaping excellent musical ideas, all of them germinated in diversity and ultimately integrated in a cohesive way. Performances, as usual, are solid and impressive, always keeping up with the pace and melodic demands of each particular compositions: Schicke, Fürhs and Fröhling are classy musicians who serve for the band as a whole, never trying to steal the limelight or challenge each other - instead, they prefer to interact fluidly in favour of a shared complementation and mutual support. The catchy opener 'Wizzard' finds the band exploring the realms of jazz fusion with ease, quite vivaciously due to the rhythm pattern's funky cadence: a recognizable, uplifting main motif is the key to get in touch with the track's mood. It kind of reminds me of "Rain Dances"-Camel-meets- "Romantic Warrior"-RtF , although I'm only mentioning these bands as a reference for the listener: anyway, a special mention goes to Fröhling's spectacular leads. The jazz factor is later reiterated on 'Driftin'' and '1580'. The former pretty much follows in the opener's footsteps, albeit incorporating and added touch of symph stuff; the latter contains a featured presence of grand piano and acoustic guitar, conjuring the distant melancholy of lonely people holding on for one last drink in a pub during the final moments of nighttime. 'Artificial Energy' is a showcase for the trio's mysterious side: somber guitar leads (very Frippian, indeed) soar above an ethereal background constructed by guitar arpeggios, subtle keyboard layers and soft percussion. I wouldn't have minded if it were a bit longer. 'Autumn Sun in Cold Water', 'Troja' (my personal fave from this album) and the playful closure 'Explorer' are more closely related to the previous album's overall spirit. 'Autumn Sun' conveys dreamy ambiences, primarily sustained on the featured use of keyboard leads and textures, properly complemented by guitar solos; 'Troja' starts with a mid-tempo first section, mainly based on a clever use of diverse motifs and its consequent variations, while the second section goes for a more Wagnerian road, portraying an ever-increasing energy that, near the end, seems to conjure images of conflict and drama. General diagnose: yet another SFF masterpiece, though not as brilliant as the preceding one.
Cesar Inca | 4/5 |

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