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The Old Dead Tree - The Water Fields CD (album) cover

THE WATER FIELDS

The Old Dead Tree

 

Experimental/Post Metal

3.77 | 4 ratings

From Progarchives.com, the ultimate progressive rock music website

kluseba
4 stars After two true masterpieces, something went wrong on this album. I have some problems to describe exactly what it is. It's not a musically bad album or something unusual that wouldn't fit to the band as the typical trademarks are still present, but I feel a lack of courage and creativity on this record. There is also a little lack of genius and atmosphere. Almost every song rushes past but there are no catchy melodies, intense moments or touching lyrics. Even after almost ten tries, I have some difficulties to review this album.

The album starts with a heavier song called "Start The Fire" that isn't able to create a drowning and melancholic atmosphere like the previous album openers did. The song tries to vary from harsh death metal parts to melancholic and progressive gothic parts but the track sounds too much like a routine job and simply too artificial. This is the problem of most of the songs. A track like "What's Done Is Done" or even the weak "Rise To Occasion" have all the trademarks I like about the band but I would nevertheless describe these song as notoriously dumb and almost faceless as the band doesn't vary that much and hypnotizes in a rather calm and emotionless way.

The stronger tracks are mostly towards the middle and the second part of the album. The very soft and dreamy title track "The Water Fields" is perfect to relax in an isolated room and has a longing melancholy that sounds fresh and intense. It is without a doubt the best track on the album. "Is Your Soul For Sale" convinces with a very progressive lounge introduction with almost jazzy tones and is amongst the strongest and most diversified tracks on the album. "Regarding Kate" is the track where Manuel Munoz delivers a brilliant job and shows what a diversified and intense singer he is as his voice alone carries the whole and musically rather boring song and its atmosphere. The surprising and weird sounding orchestral influences of the album closer "This Is Now Farewell", that are already slightly present in the rather mediocre "A Distant Light Was Shining", leave us on a melancholic note. As one can see, the talent is still there and the album is far from being really bad or a true disappointment but I still feel torn apart about this record.

The album has not the same magic and such a high amount of changes as the two previous ones. The album is still better than anything bands like "Opeth", "Paradise Lost" or "Katatonia" might have done in their careers but all in all it is the band's weakest release. This album may also please you if you like recent stuff from "Moonspell" but this French has honestly said a very proper, unique, experimental and particular sound which you may adore or dislike so that any kind of comparison is only a little hint or allusion.

I am still very sad that this promising and original group broke up as they left a big hole that no other band would be able to fill in again. I hope that they may one day reunite but all that is left to say right now is:

This is now farewell...

Originally published on www.metal-archives.com on February 8th of the year 2011.

kluseba | 4/5 |

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