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Symphony X - The Divine Wings Of Tragedy CD (album) cover

THE DIVINE WINGS OF TRAGEDY

Symphony X

 

Progressive Metal

4.08 | 426 ratings

From Progarchives.com, the ultimate progressive rock music website

mel from hell
4 stars 'The Divine Wings of Tragedy' is hailed by many as the magnum opus of Symphony X. Personally,I prefer the heavier and aggressive style they have incorporated in their latest releases. Whatsoever there are moments to be hailed and they will be further discussed.

The opening track 'Of Sins and Shadows' is one of the best songs of the album,it has heavy riffing,neoclassical elements and catchy symphonic choruses. The power metal element is present but not the more prevalent. Progressive tones along with,if I can call it like this, baroque music. (4.5/5)

'Sea of Lies' begins with an interesting bass theme and is similar to the style of the previous track and emphasizes a lot in the main chorus. I think that it has more power metal elements than the opening track. Also,Pinella delivers a more atmospheric sound with his keyboards. (4/5)

From the beginning of 'Out of the Ashes' by listening to the keyboards it seems that this is going to be a mostly power metal song and yes,it is but remains interesting. The lyrics are also quite realistic about the maturity of becoming a man from a youngster after having lived difficulties(this is how I explain these probably metaphoric verses of the song). (3.5/5)

'Accolade' is one of the most uninteresting songs and cannot be compared to masterpiece 'Accolade II' from 'The Odyssey' album. It has good proggy moments but mellow tracks are not my best to be honest. (3/5)

'Pharaoh' as it can be guessed by the name is more mystical and atmospheric and therefore progressive,in purpose to give the correct touch for the mysterious stories of Egypt. There is an interesting bass tapping by mr. Miller which adds to its progressive character. Choruses are again carefully crafted. (4/5)

'Eyes of Medusa' has the most interesting keyboards work so far and has a very interesting change of music while it reaches its end where there is a classical(symphonic) arrangement by Romeo and Pinella. Allen performs brilliantly even if I believe that the chorus is not so successful. One of the most interesting songs. (4.5/5)

'The Witching Hour' is the most mediocre song in 'TDWOT' but everyone has the right to have a filler in their artistic work. Annoying chorus and nothing so special,mainly power metal type of song. (2/5)

The self-titled track is plainly simply one of the most magic moments that only Symphony X can give us. 20 minutes full of rhythm change and frequent alteration in music style while maintaining the heavy,progressive and power character. There are some harsher vocals by Allen which I personally like. The best song of this album of course.(5/5)

And the end is a mellow tone but very emotional and Allen proves again why he is one of the most talented progressive metal vocalists while Pinella accompanies him with his piano work(4.5/5)

To sum up,'TDWOT" is a very solid and technical release by Symphony X and the album that gave them the needed publicity. Surely one of the most high acclaimed releases of their career and of progressive metal in general. The only negative is that there are maybe quite more power metal elements than needed but it is a matter of taste. Some do not like their latest releases. As a result, I regard it as an excellent addition to anyone's progressive collection (4 stars)

mel from hell | 4/5 |

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