Header
Abel Ganz - The Dangers Of Strangers CD (album) cover

THE DANGERS OF STRANGERS

Abel Ganz

 

Neo-Prog

2.96 | 42 ratings

From Progarchives.com, the ultimate progressive rock music website

Cesar Inca
Special Collaborator
Honorary Collaborator
3 stars Abel Ganz was one of those British bands that took the symphonic prog trend to a more immediate, straightforward realm, creating catchy melodies with an incorporated pop feel: that is, neo-prog, pretty much similar to what Pendragon was doing back in the 80s - not as emotionally rich as Marillion, nor as powerful as Pallas or Saga, nor as mysteriously somber as IQ -, just effective songs with a prog touch, well rooted in a tightly focused sense of melody. As it's usual in neo-prog, the keyboard layers and harmonies are the main sources that sustain the songs, though they're not as massive as in Pendragon's albums nor as pompous as in Pallas's recordings. Abel Ganz should be mostly regarded for their good taste at writing and their fluid interplaying, but not for bringing out something really new or amazingly special to the neo-prog genre (or prog, in general). The first two tracks are the longest ones, conceived as multi-part suites. The opening namesake song kicks off in a similar vein as the opening cut of Mike Rutherford's "Smallcreep's Day", with a mid-tempo motif: then, after a faster interlude that occasionally gets a bit epic, comes a different mid-tempo motif that features a recurrent ethereal melodic line on synth. 'Rain Again' finds Alan Reed delivering lead voice right before he entered the Pallas ranks: his vocal cadence fits perfectly the melancholy ambience in the slow parts of the song, but not as much the most enthusiastic moments. Some of the most energetic guitar parts of the album are comprised here. The following three numbers are nothing to write home about, but it is worth noting the sharp interplaying that takes place during the instrumental prelude of 'Hustler II', before Christopher Forsyth begins to sing his lines. 'Pick a Window' is the nice instrumental that closes down the album with a touch of simple elegance. Not great, but easily enjoyable, particularly the first two tracks.
Cesar Inca | 3/5 |

MEMBERS LOGIN ZONE

As a registered member (register here if not), you can post rating/reviews (& edit later), comments reviews and submit new albums.

You are not logged, please complete authentication before continuing (use forum credentials).

Share this ABEL GANZ review

>

Review related links

Copyright Prog Archives, All rights reserved. | Legal Notice | Privacy Policy | Advertise | GeoIP Services by MaxMind | RSS + syndications

Other sites in the MAC network: JazzMusicArchives.com — the ultimate jazz music virtual community | MetalMusicArchives.com — the ultimate metal music virtual community


Server processing time: 0.02 seconds