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Pablo - Pablo

PABLO "EL ENTERRADOR"

Pablo

 

Symphonic Prog

3.76 | 44 ratings

From Progarchives.com, the ultimate progressive rock music website

Cesar Inca
Special Collaborator
Honorary Collaborator
4 stars Back in the first half of the 80s, there was still some good prog music cooking on. From Argentina, the quartet Pablo "El Enterrador" (a quintet on stage) did quite an excellent job with their namesake album. The solid interplay between both keyboardists (with the Yamaha electric grand piano assuming a proficient role on the front) and Sali's precise drumming (which shows a strong jazz-rock flavour) are the most prominent assets in the band's instrumental proficiency; meanwhile, Blanc delivers his bass parts in perfect consonance with Sali, while his guitar riffs and solos are effectively constructed to complement the multi-keyboard inputs (orchestrations, solos, layers). Blanc is also the lead singer, and his singing is certainly soft enough (at times, even romantic) to remain connected with the evocative nature of almost all compositions. Odd signatures and mood shifts are present in this album's repertoire, but they are not flaunted at all: the foursome, as writers, are more interested in showing their way to create emotional ambiences than showing off their regular progressive "ambitions". Comparisons are usually made with Locanda delle Fate, and I would add the best ofARRWT-era Genesis, as well. These comparissons may be valid to a certain degree: but generally speaking, Pablo's Latin American essence feels definitely obvious, so it would be more accurate to say that they are more related to early 80s Espíritu, Invisible and Spineta-Jade - all of them, Argentinean acts. The opening track 'Carrousell de la Vieja Idiotez' pretty much epitomizes the overall musical spirit that is to be displayed all throughout the album. Tracks 2, 3, 6 & 7 bear basically the same particular touch that the guys of Pablo manage to develop and portray with both elegance and skill - a special mention goes to track 3, 'Quién Gira y Quién Sueña', which is arguably the most emotionally charged track in the repertoire, containing dreamy synth adornments, ethereal piano chord progressions, and an eerie guitar solo during the last section that is fully expanded on to the fade-out. oh, this number should have been a bit longer. All in all, it is in the two instrumentals that Pablo "El Enterrador" exhibits their technical skills more intensively: 'Ilusión en Siete Octavos' and 'La Herencia de Pablo' are real amazing pieces that even bear a certain air of added aggressiveness, but never getting too rough, since the habitual sense of exquisiteness prevails. 'Accionista' is a minor point here: this is simply a straightforward AOR-ish number, something like Survivor-meets-post McDonald Foreigner, that seems to have been conceived as a potential single A-side (it is even 3'13" long, very conveniently). Nothing wrong with that in some other album by some other band, but it is too evidently unfitting in here. Anyway, despite my remark on this small detail, "Pablo "El Enterrador"" is an excellent album created and performed by an ensemble of excellent musicians.

P.S.: The re-edition released by the Argentinean label Viajero Inmóvil (www.viajeroinmovil.com) in 2005 contains four bonus tracks recorded live in a 1985 gig, with a slightly modified line-up: 'Celeste Cielo', 'Bananas', 'Sé Tu Payaso' and 'Los Juegos del Hombre' are pretty much consistent with what we find in the album's official repertoire. A recommended purchase, indeed.

Cesar Inca | 4/5 |

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