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Battles - Gloss Drop CD (album) cover

GLOSS DROP

Battles

 

Post Rock/Math rock

3.79 | 62 ratings

From Progarchives.com, the ultimate progressive rock music website

Horizons
4 stars Balance of wit and power........

With an exceptional debut, Mirrored, Battles continues to provide quirk and harmony to their sound. Here you will find songs that feature guest vocalist: Matias Aguayo, Gary Numan, Kazu Makino, and Yamantaka Eye, songs that fix on a hardy groove, and unique instrumentals that progressively add more light-hearted layers to the mix. All the songs on Gloss Drop are wonderfully produced and are executed with the highest quality.

Starting with the tracks accompanied by vocals - Ice Cream, My Machines, Sweetie & Shag, and Sundome - the songs give a nice change in the album's overall vision, all having smooth compositions and wonderful blending due to Battles' nature to never go over-the-top in musicianship. The band seamlessly gels with all the singers and doesn't really feel like a jam session with some stranger pretending to lead the band. In my opinion all of these songs are real highlights of Gloss Drop because of diversity and the honest fun found with listening to them.

Ice Cream *grunts*: Beginning with an unparalleled intro, Ice Cream really grows a backbone with John Stanier's typical holy trinity (snare,hi-hat, bass) approach. He truly is the heart of this group, never coming intro the forefront with unnecessary chops but allowing his two buds, Dave Konopka (bass and effects) and Ian Williams (guitar and keys) to leave tasteful and massively catchy licks. The keyboards lay down a fairly hectic and addictive line, while he bass guitar adds its opinion every so often to give a real bounce to the song. The vocals, while lyrically are incomprehensible, add some flavor and fit right in with the fairly heavy song. *dum buh bum bum bum*

My Machines: Gary Numan joins Battles with a heavier tone and more intermittent keyboard passages to create a real powerful song. The guitars gets some real muscle here, especially the bass. Ian does a fantastic filling up the musical pores in the song with both dark lingering notes and his bright riffs. Gary Numan is fantastic here and is as powerful as a train (car). The outro of My Machines allows the band to let go and really solidify their power.

Sweetie & Shag: Here is the weakest vocal song on Gloss Drop. Though it isn't bad, it doesn't really bring anything to the table. The song gets inside you, vocally and musically, but isn't mathy in any of it's intentions. Kazu's voice is quite soft and contrasts the other singers on the album, my favorite aspect of the song.

Sundome: Creating an eclectic frame for an intro, Sundome mixes echoing upbeat keyboards, tortured guitars that immerse Yamantaka's chanting, all topped off with the fundamental sleigh bells. The atmosphere collapses into a flawless Battles jam. The music is more airy with all players in perfect equilibrium. Vocals provide a funky melody to it all. Sundome really has a natural progression that fluxes force and sleekness throughout the nearly eight minute song.

As a Math-Rock band, Battles specializes in feeling and their plateau approach to composition. Their instrumentals feel compact, edgy, and complementary. Africastle, Futura, Wall Streeet, and White Electric are four other highlights from the album.

Africastle: After a bellowing guitar and a lurking keyboard are introduced to each other with a single tom, the song takes a turn for the better. While the keyboards are only a ripple in the wake of the rhythm section the passage remains tight. The intensity sturrs before the band takes a new angle for the last two minutes. Both syncopated drums and a distorted bass led into the whimsical electronic bow.

Futura: With a duo of loops guitars, brilliant drum placement, and some of my favorite keyboard waltzes, Battles creates a sturdy foundation for small variations later on in the song. Filled with characteristics that make-up the band's sound.

Wall Streeet: This song starts off and dominates with disorderly conduct from the band. Instead of using their trademark groove style, here you find a more free execution. Yields career-peaking musicianship for them. Wall Streeet also has a proggy bridge. Having trinkets play along with the bass guitar with an otherwise empty zone of music. Contrasts the entire mood and really feeds on the sporadic feeling on the song.

White Electric: Slowing incorporating every instrument, drum, and note, White Electric ushers in my favorite instrumental from Gloss Drop. The build-up makes you wait and gain suspense for what is coming while still satisfying you with the eccentric playing. The keyboards sewing together the others with waving playing, and the drums adding to the rising courage are fantastic. Eventually, the song becomes conversational, switching off in flaunting ability.

Gloss Drop is an essential album because of the joy, power, and expertise it utilizes. All songs are a blast and posses a unique color it adds the Math-Rock canvas. Hope you enjoy it as much as I do. 4.5 stars rounded down.

Horizons | 4/5 |

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