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Big Big Train - English Electric (Part One) CD (album) cover

ENGLISH ELECTRIC (PART ONE)

Big Big Train

 

Crossover Prog

4.19 | 741 ratings

From Progarchives.com, the ultimate progressive rock music website

BrufordFreak
5 stars Without a doubt Dave Longdon is the new shining star of modern progressive rock; his vocal, composition, and flute contributions to Big Big Train have taken this band to a whole new level, a level that may imprint BBT into the Prog Hall of Fame--one of the few modern bands to achieve a standing right among the masters of the 1970s. Also, while I was not convinced of Dave Gregory's 'fitting in' based upon his previous BBT contributions, on this album everything, everybody is clicking. Amazing song compositions with fresh and diverse stylistic presentations topped by the amazing--did I say "amazing"? I meant, "incomparable"- -vocals of Dave Longdon. And this time the lyrics and vocal passion fit with the music. I LOVE these lyrics. Everything component of every song seems woven into a magical tapestry worthy of adorning the walls of kings! With The Underfall Yard we saw a lot of glimpses but not everything with the "newcomers" (D'Virgilio, Gregory, and Longdon) had gelled yet.

"The First Rebreather" (10/10) is an amazing opener which reminds me of the way "Dance on a Volcano" or "A Musical Box" opened their respective albums, the former for Nick D'Virgilio's display of Phil Collins-like drumming (Phil at his absolute best) and the latter for the changing dynamics and essential individual contributions to the whole-group masterpiece. Amazing story, lyrics and singing! Wonderful weaving of al the instrumentalists AND the vocal arrangements. A perfect song! (though the nod to GENESIS is quite obvious.)

"Uncle Jack" (9/10) Off-beat like a STEVE HACKETT song (or, a little bit like "I Know What I Like [In Your Wardrobe]"), this is, to me, refreshing for its celebration of an average Joe (again like "I Know What I Like"). I bit like a carry over from The Underfall Yard, but still a mature, masterful blend of everyone's talents. Plus, banjo!

"Winchester from St. Giles' Hill" (11/10) was my instant favorite. Now I can't decide between it and all of the other 10s! A beautiful song from it's opening notes and accompaniment. Incredible vocal melodies and vocal arrangements. I love Dave Gregory's jazzy (almost PAUL WELLER-like) guitar. Amazing chorus. WOW! What power and feeling! Then to soften with those guitar strums and mellotron. The bass playing just kills me. This is a funky jazzed up prog MASTERPIECE! And then the MICHEL LE GRAND/JEAN-PIERRE RAMPAL almost- classical section in the middle! Followed by an awesome guitar solo which brings us back first to the funk rhythm and then to the AMAZING story, vocal, vocal arrangement. I'm undone! TOO beautiful for words . . .

***** Each year I give a 11 our of 10 rating and this, ladies and gentlement, is that song.; the one song that transcends my expectations for the potential for human creativity.

"Judas Unrepentant" (8/10) unfortunately begins with a bit of a Genesis "Illegal Alien" feel to it. Luckily the chorus and bridges diverge quite a bit. The mellow, almost classical section beginning at the 3:30 mark is a welcome, even masterful, diversion. When the main song theme returns it with a wonderful symphonic crescendo of sound. Nice little organ solo to cover the return to the original "Alien" beat/sound. An light, upbeat, fast-paced yet somehow heavy and complex song. Fascinating!

"Summoned by Bells" (9/10) begins with a pretty Tony Banks/Anthony Phillips piano arpeggio before establishing itself as something else, quite, with cello, doo-wap b-vox, recorders, and even the kitchen sink thrown in. (Just kidding!) Have I mentioned how noticeable and creative--even melodic--is the bass work on this album? Wonderful. And replete with so many unexpected flourishes and techniques. And NIck D'Virgilio really makes his mastery known without going over the top or without having to be mixed too forward in the production mix. This song provides a perfect example of how Dave Gregory's guitar work fits perfectly whereas on previous albums it may not have worked, may even have stood out a bit too much. On this one every strum, arpeggio and strum fits perfectly. Absolutely stunned and LOVE the delicate, emotional outro with its gorgeous horns and heart-wrenching Fripp-like guitar solo.

"Upton Hill" (9/10) reminds me of a perfect PREFAB SPROUT or DREAM ACADEMY song-- quirky yet drop-dead gorgeous. Prominently featured flute, cello, accordian, female b-vox and banjo help provide this one with its own unique feel.

The first 1:36 of "A Boy in Darkness" (10/10) has a very KATE BUSH and TEARS FOR FEARS feel to it. Until the very TEARS FOR FEARS breakout at 1:36. Later, the almost jazzy top-speed instrumental section in the middle is filled with great drumming, great guitar, flute, strings, percussives, and organ is one of the highlights of the album. Breathtakeing. And then the segue back into the vocal sections is so masterful. Absolutely brilliant! Fripp guitar soloing beneath Longdon's powerful singing. The final minute is a crescendo of power and emotion with Gregory and D'Virgilio leading the way. Love the oscillating organ to-fade.

"Hedgerow" (10/10) has an amazing XTC/BYRDS/ANT PHILLIPS/BEATLES feel, musically (thanks, Dave Gregory!), topped with some jaw-droppingly astounding vocal arrangements. Slow guitar arpeggios over which a solo viola/violin dirges propels the song into emotional depths of amazing proportions. Top this off with Nick D'Virgilio's stupendous drumming and you have the best crossover prog song of the year. The lyrics are the coup de grace?they bring me to my knees! I am not worthy! Especially the repeating flower names sung by the background singers! What an end to an amazing album?an album of a quality and consistency that I thought I'd never hear! Move aside Echolyn, Marillion, Astra, TFK, and even Anglagard.

Hail! to the new kings of the hill!

Congratulations Andy and Greg: Your passion, vision, and perseverance has paid off! This is the best music album I've heard from 2012. It may be (dare I say or even think it?) a perfect album. So many, many times as I listen to this album am I just astounded at the instrumental, compositional, incidental and lead sound, and textural shifts that occur--and frequently-- within each song?not to mention the unparalleled vocal arrangements. (I beg of you: Has ANY album EVER put forth such astounding vocal arrangements??) These five gentlemen are truly master music craftsmen. No: Master music artisans. This album is, to me, akin to a Sistine Chapel, a Taj Mahal, a Monet, a Beethoven's 9th.

BrufordFreak | 5/5 |

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