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Edgar Froese - Stuntman CD (album) cover

STUNTMAN

Edgar Froese

 

Progressive Electronic

3.78 | 57 ratings

From Progarchives.com, the ultimate progressive rock music website

Mellotron Storm
Prog Reviewer
3 stars This was Edgar's last album of the seventies released in 1979. He's gone completely digital for the first time although he does add analogue synths and piano to this record. The mellotron is gone (gasp).

"Stuntman" has this electronic beat as almost horn-like synths join in. "It Would Be Like Samoa" has these outbursts of sound along with birds chirping then flute-like sounds. An electronic beat joins in before 1 1/2 minutes. The flute-like sounds stop after 4 minutes as other sounds cascade in and out. Then it becomes more spacey. "Detroit Snackbar Dreamer" has these strange and fairly high pitched sounding synths and a beat.

"Drunken Mozart In The Desert" is spacey as a beat comes in just before 2 minutes. It stops after 5 minutes as sounds pulse. Horn-like synths with spacey background sounds take over 6 1/2 minutes in. "A Dali-Esque Sleep Fuse" is really the one song that stands out for me in a positive way. Faint sounds to start then it picks up with a beat. Guitar-like synths come in then they stop before 6 minutes as a fast paced sound takes over. It's spacey late. "Scarlet Score For Mescalero" has these slowly pulsating sounds as other high pitched ones play over top.

A good album and one many Froese fans rate highly. For me 3 stars is the right rating.

Mellotron Storm | 3/5 |

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