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Piero Ezio e Tino - Mi Chiamo Piero CD (album) cover

MI CHIAMO PIERO

Piero Ezio e Tino

 

Rock Progressivo Italiano

3.67 | 2 ratings

From Progarchives.com, the ultimate progressive rock music website

coasterzombie
3 stars This trio from Voghera produced one little-known album on the French label Rare before disappearing. Songwriter Piero Cairo would later have a career in the disco era, but this 1972 release is clearly inspired by the progressive rock movement. Assisted by drummer Sergio Chiesa and pianist Roberto Ferracin, Piero Ezio e Tino play cerebral pop with a solemn feel, balanced frequently with psychedelic effects and concise construction. No song on Mi Chiamo Piero is over five minutes, but don't let that fool you...the symphonic RPI sound appears early and often, supplemented by various influences including an almost Mediterranean feel despite the group's landlocked locale. I even hear hints of tropicalia and Brazilian music, but it is impossible to know whether this genre influenced the album. Mi Chiamo Piero is exceedingly obscure and not much else is known about the album, and a CD issue is sorely overdue. The album easily earns three stars, but does not quite impress me enough to command four.

Mi Chiamo Piero wastes no time in declaring its prog tendencies, as the title track weaves through singer-songwriter territory, symphonic bombast and meditative romanticism within its five minutes. What may actually be the best track on the entire album, "Mi Chiamo Piero" sets the tone for its namesake but does not necessarily follow through. "Il Cavallo Cingolato" is far less complex but still extremely energetic, and features Piero Cario's keyboard effects which will appear frequently. "Prima Che Sia Qui La Notte" is a far cry from the previous track, as the upbeat feel is all but gone and a minor key introduction gives way to an anthemic chorus. This is short-lived as the jubilation is again supplanted by contemplative solo acoustic guitar. Ezio Cristiani's guitar also sets the tone for "Orizzonte Che Vai," a short but sweet number that is reminiscent of Mauro Pelosi in its melancholy. "Tutto Passa Tra La Gente" has a breezy feel that never becomes banal despite Piero's crooning vocal performance. The first side ends with "Io Non So Il Tuo Nome," a poppy and somewhat forgettable song that reminds me of Era di Acquario.

The superior "Una Cosa Da Niente" begins side two, and here Piero sounds assertive and passionate in his singing. In fact, the passion he displays sounds almost exactly like Alusa Fallax singer Augusto 'Duty' Cirla, and unusually so. My only quibble with the song is that it ends too soon! "Un Filo D'Erba" has no drums but some percussion and fingerpicked guitar to provide the rhythm, and plenty of keyboard and vocal effects to hold the listener's interest. "Centro Lire Di Musica" is probably the most progressive song on this side, as compressed piano and stately organ are joined by powerful drumming and the forceful voice of Piero. "Rugiada Gelata" continues this sound in a slower and more deliberate way. "Un Uomo Se Ne Va" is somewhat bland by comparison and kind of forgettable. Finally "Ma Lui Non C'Era" is a good conclusion to the album with some lovely keyboard flourishes and an uncharacteristically positive mood. Overall, Mi Chiamo Piero is absolutely listenable and reasonably enjoyable. I can't quite recommend it enough to consider it essential. Until a reissue label takes notice, keep it on the back burner and wait patiently.

coasterzombie | 3/5 |

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