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THE COLLECTORS

The Collectors

Proto-Prog


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Sean Trane
SPECIAL COLLABORATOR
Prog Folk
4 stars 4,5 stars really!!!

Behind this superb Art Nouveau artwork sleeve is hiding one of the true, hidden and forgotten gems of Canada. To achieve this kind of perfection as a first try, back in the late 60's is simply astounding (the only had a few singles beforehand) and unfortunately all too rare. Bill Henderson and Claire Lawrence (the main core of the group) make a fantastic songwriting partnership that will last a few albums, and even if not perfect,

Right from the start , guys know how to bait a discerning proghead, by giving us a taste of what is to come without revealing how the main course with the opening (but rather light ) What Is Love and then plunging into serious business with She, a real feast for vocal harmonies; But they are still teasing us (especially with that flute around the end), but the wait is over; Everything we suspected in the first two songs get confirmation with Howard Christian's Older, loaded with drama, suspense and that typical late 60's flavour when everything was still to be done musically, artistically, socially, sexually, and generally progressive-wise. A full blown epic in just five min, even if the superb vocals account for roughly 50% of the spine chills; Lydia Purple is more popish, just to give us a break, but then comes the first nail in your coffin, One Act Play. Somehow not far away from very cheesy moments of Moody Blues or Rare Bird's vocal orgies, without Mellotrons, these guys bring you to ecstasy without any gadgets.

But all of that you have heard so far was simply foreplay, just getting your ears/appetite warmed-up for the main orgy: the 19 min+ What Love where not one single second is wasted in self-indulging solos (as was the craze back then): no we are dealing with an epic that could've been divided into multi-movement suite (like Supper or even contemporary Procol Harum's In Twas Held In I - if they even knew it was hip to do such a thing) and outside a few moments that clearly outline we are in 68, this is one of the earliest prog epics. These guys are not content to rivet you to your seat, they are holding you still so they are driving nails into your coffin and every minute going by is sealing your fate. Don't even think for a second they are taking the easy road either, a round the 1 min mark, they drive a spike right through heart, another through your brains and the last one right in your genitals. A slight flute warns you that you have reached paradise. This record might just drive this atheist to heaven!!!!!!!

Need I say more??????????????????????????????????????

Actually, yes!!! The record company says New Vibrations From Canada on the back sleeve, but when some almost 30 years later, you listen to this record, WOW!!! They are still brand new vibrations.

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Send comments to Sean Trane (BETA) | Report this review (#64162)
Posted Wednesday, January 11, 2006 | Review Permalink
5 stars One of the many vinyl records in my collection I bought in a second hand record store for a few guilders, back in the early eighties. Somehow I knew that it was a very special one - I can't tell if it was because I read a few lines about it or by intuition. Anyway, I was far from disappointed when I gave it a spin. The verso side of the well-designed cover promised "New vibrations from Canada!" and these are good vibrations indeed! The vocal arrangements can contest those of Brian Wilson in his heyday.

The first track, "What Is Love", a sneak preview of the epic track on side 2, gives a good impression of this album in a nutshell. "She (Will o' the Wind)" is my favourite of the short tracks. It reminds me somehow of "Paperback Writer", but the vocals make this track sound more psychedelic and it has a Jethro Tull-ish flute. "Howard Christman's Older" is the only track on side 1 that passes the 5-minute mark. The vocal melody is rather folky, but the song turns soon into a psychedelic piece. "Lydia Purple" is the only song here that is written by others. It has a more conventional song structure than the other songs on this album and it fits well in the period in which the album was recorded. Side one ends with the Moody Blues-like "One Act Play". Like in "Howard Christman's Older", the vocals are performed by lead singer Howie Vickers alone.

However good the shorter tracks may be, it is the 19 minute-epic "What Love (Suite)" that make this album deserve a prominent place into prog history. This is, as far as I know, the first side-long epic track in prog, dating from late 1967 or early 1968, and it is well worth the listen: not a follow-up of different melodic themes, but a coherent piece of music with both loud and quiet moments. The emotive vocals are great throughout the song. The supreme moment, however, is the saxophone solo at 13-15 minutes. "What Love (Suite)" is essential proto-prog and should be part of the canon of progressive rock. This album should finally find its proper place in the history of progressive rock, and no longer be an overlooked gem or a collector's item. I recommend it to anyone who likes truly progressive music from the 60's. It is worth at least 4.5 stars; I give five.

Does someone hear?

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Send comments to someone_else (BETA) | Report this review (#245157)
Posted Sunday, October 18, 2009 | Review Permalink
friso
PROG REVIEWER
5 stars The Collectors - st (1968) * review #300 celebration! *

The Collectors came as a surprise for me, the record was given to me and it was said to be 'very good'. Now, there are many good very good records from '68, but there aren't many that can really be called progressive. This remarkable album has a full-blown progressive vision with many inventive ideas and breakthroughs. Of course, Zappa had already done crazy stuff, The United States of America would release there perhaps even better debut, The Doors had done some ground-braking work in '67 and King Crimson was almost ready to go in the studio, but still I find this album a very rewarding achievement for it's year of release.

So, what's so special about this record from Canadian soil?

It has superb song-writing with intelligent use of unusual chord progressions, it has an adventurious (as in the better sympho-prog) sound and it has an epic with of 19 minutes which shows the boundaries of what is possible (at the time). All this sounds very seventies-like, but the sound is clearly that from a sixties beat-band/psychedelic-band on fire. Perhaps a bit like the Beatles, some Doors, yet different. The vocals are amazing. Lead vocalist Howie Vickie has this huge voice, at times reminding me of Jim Morrison in his use. The back-up vocals are brilliant and harmonically challenging. For those who liked the Beach Boys, this is even better.

1. What Is love (3:45) The opening track is a peaceful introduction of what's to come. Some important elements of the epic on side two (with almost the same title) are played. Still this short track has a sympathetic nature.

2. She (Will Of The Wisp) (3:45) This is were the progginess begins. This is a very adventerious song with an up-tempo sound. The melodies are inventive and the vocals are amazing. The heavy acoustic guitars sound great and the rhythmical developments are refreshing and psychedelic.

3. Howard Christian's Older (5:10) This song has a folk-approach with a nice acoustic intro. The vocals tell a story about a very special boy with mysterious powers. The song develops in a rock-song with fierce vocals and a mystical sound. The melodies of the vocals are brilliant, unexpected notes over already special chords. Actually, this song is quite psychedelic and the ending is strange.

4. Lydia Purple (2:45) This song also has a folky intro (with a flute) and playful guitar/vocals theme. Extremely catchy, very nice psychedelics from the sixties. The second voice is magical on the second couplet. In the middle of the song there are some more folky moments with a string-section and some flutes. The third couplet also has a third voice which is utterly brilliant.

5. One Act Play (3:40) Perhaps my favorite. This graveyard type ballad with it's dark and serious mood is just amazing. The composition is among the best of every song written in the sixties. The many chord-progressions that all have an impact combined with these spooky vocals are very effective. So, ever wanted to listen to doom-psychedelics from the sixties?

6. What Love (19:15) One of the few full-blown epics of '68. More daring than Procol Harum's In Held was I, The Collectors explore a lot of moods and atmospheres. The opening section introduces the question 'What is this Love?'. No emphasis on romanticism, but an almost desperate question. After this the song develops into a church-like pastoral moment with nice combined vocal efforts. Later in the song moments of serious aggression, psychedelics and avant-garde are apparent. Though it's a strong epic, the ending section could have been a bit more substantial. A conclusive (and perhaps melodic) ending-section could have made it even better.

Conclusion. I love these early albums that are so expressive and ground-braking. This is an album that should have been far more influential then it was. This is a record that should have a place in all our collections, it's not just a collector's item. The song-writing is monumental and bombastic and the epic on side two is indeed very brave with it's moments of extreme aggression. Four and a halve stars would be appropriate, but since Sean Trane also came to this conclusion and gave four, I'll compensate by giving five stars. Ah, what the heck - this is a masterpiece! Recommended to every-one interested in psychedelic rock, early progressive rock and the development of the genre itself. Furthermore this is one of the most important Canadian releases of the sixties.

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Send comments to friso (BETA) | Report this review (#308682)
Posted Sunday, November 07, 2010 | Review Permalink
4 stars The Collectors representate the Canadian psychedelic movement. Their album cover is a real beauty and with the backcover they'll make us sure that they wanna be really psychedelic.The first side contains five short songs and the second side just one. The second side is a compilation of the first side and adds something extra.

-side 1- The songs are mostly folk-rooted and sometimes reach a garage sound. The first side is only slightly psychedelic, but sometimes they use some nice harmonies and the vocals are really great. The vocalist is capable of soft and harmonious voices and also of stronger vocals. There are lot's of spacy background vocals.

My favourite song of the first side surely is Howards Christian's Older. The lyrics are about a boy who on early age was a genious, but losts it's grip on mankind.

-side 2- As I've mentioned before, the second side is a compilation of the songs of the first side and adds something extra. The extra-part contains some really acid sounds - in fact they seemed to try to make as much noice at once as possible for a few times. Well, I thougth this side was a bit fragmentated - just a lot of themes were putted after each other. Still, it's a nice effort.

Because of the lengthy composition this could be seen as protoprog, but still it was just an example of the psychedelic scene.

As I do really like psychedelic music I can easily compare this record to other psychedelic records like Love's "Da Capo" which also contains a lenghty second side. I thougth that lot's of other psychedlic bands like Country Joe and the Fish, The 13th Floor Elevators, The United States of America, etc. were a bit better than the Collectors. For a psychedelic rock collector this is a nice addition to his/her collection, but I should not mention it as a masterpiece. So, four stars for the Canadians.

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Send comments to the philosopher (BETA) | Report this review (#597722)
Posted Thursday, December 29, 2011 | Review Permalink
Warthur
PROG REVIEWER
3 stars The Collectors' self-titled debut album shows a fine command of psychedelic rock and pop styles of the time. The best side is actually the first side, which offers a brace of small but perfectly formed psych-turning-to-prog songs with, at points, really interesting lyrics and structures (see, for instance, Howard Christian's Older). The side two epic, What Love, starts off strong but unfortunately loses steam, rapidly turning into a substandard imitation of Doors epics such as The End or When the Music's Over - whatever Howie Vickie's talents are, he's not Jim Morrison and it's rather embarrassing to listen to him trying to be Jim Morrison.

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Send comments to Warthur (BETA) | Report this review (#924340)
Posted Tuesday, March 05, 2013 | Review Permalink

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