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Pelican - Pink Mammoth CD (album) cover

PINK MAMMOTH

Pelican

Experimental/Post Metal


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3 stars The cover is nice, by the way.

Pink Mammoth (the song itself) is good, but not essential. Even though it's a typical Pelican's song, it's very predictable and unsurprising. City Of Echoes (the album) has the same atmosphere, but the songs on it are much more inspired and diverse. Well, Pink Mammoth is just an updated version of Mammoth from the first EP, so it seems to me that it's just an average post-metal song by Pelican. The second track on the EP is called End of Seasons and is concocted per se once again. It's a remix of Untitled and Aurora Borealis, with ambient sounds and noise added merely. A melting pot in short. Quite boring and incoherent, though.

Pink Mammoth is a very short EP, and to my mind 15 minutes was not enough for Pelican to write a new masterpiece. If you are a newbie, better try the splendid March Into The Sea EP.

Report this review (#165166)
Posted Thursday, March 27, 2008 | Review Permalink
Petrovsk Mizinski
PROG REVIEWER
3 stars This is Pelican's third outing in EP form. I love Pelican, don't get me wrong, but this particular release is not quite as interesting as most of the other material they have. The title track, is basically the song Mammoth, but this time reworked as a major key song. Where the original Mammoth crushed and oppressed, Pink Mammoth is an uplifting and a much lighter affair, as one may come to expect of this mammoth being 'pink' instead. While Mammoth was 5 minutes in length, Pink Mammoth is 89 seconds longer. It stops the distorted guitar at a similar time (only about 2-3 secs later) in the song where Mammoth would normally end, but this time the distorted guitar trails off for a little longer, until it fades entirely, into a very spacey, dream outro for the remainder of the track, with clean guitars and several layers of peaceful ambience.

End of Seasons (Profuse 73 remix), is a spacey remix and mash up of Untitled and Aurora Borealis from The Fire in Our Throats Will Beckon the Thaw. It's a fairly interesting track, but not always that easy to listen to. It's quite ambient and as said before, very spacey, and seems to convey totally different emotions than what Aurora Borealis and Untitled displayed. Untitled was somewhat dark and Aurora Borealis very uplifting, but End of Seasons seems to be about something else entirely, like a journey through the very last days of every season while going through a time warp or flying through space. While there are clear, gradual crescendos and diminuendos throughout the track, unfortunately the lack of a clear exact climactic point in the track makes the direction of the track somewhat unclear and unfocused at times.

While not a bad release, there is hardly anything here that is particularly new or amazing here. Not everyone may like End Of Seasons (Profuse 73 remix), but if your a Pelican fan, you may like it instantly or as it did for me, it will grow on you over time. Pink Mammoth is certainly the more traditional in terms of the Pelican sound, and so people that are already fans of Pelican should be able to get into that track more easily.

Report this review (#168276)
Posted Monday, April 21, 2008 | Review Permalink

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