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Perigeo - Abbiamo Tutti un Blues da Piangere CD (album) cover

ABBIAMO TUTTI UN BLUES DA PIANGERE

Perigeo

Jazz Rock/Fusion


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Sean Trane
SPECIAL COLLABORATOR
Prog Folk
4 stars Second album from this Roman group (unchanged line-up), released on the same RCA label, and coming with a fascinating artwork, ruined by an unlikely title. The group is still solidly run by bassist Tomasso, but unlike in Azimut, he allows the others (keyboardist D'Andrea mostly) some space for their own material, but he's still by far the most prolific writer in the group. Actually for years and from the opening track of both albums, every time I put either this album or its predecessor I always had to take a look to indeed confirm which one I am listening to. I must say that between Azimut's Posto Di Non So Dove and this album's Non C'e Tempo Da Pedere (no time to lose), both are strikingly similar, from Tomasso's great vocals to the use of a bowed bass and Sidney's Hackettian guitar, and D'Andrea's great piano (first acoustic, than electric).

The following Déjà Vu is a strange and haunted piano piece that often draws on the border of dissonance and leading into Tomasso's wordless vocals and Fasoli's sax lines. The lengthy Rituale starts on small percussions, soon joined by the piano and Sidney's wailing guitar, which histrionics will last for a good part of the track. Indeed if in the debut album US-born Toni Sydney was almost inexistent, on Abbiamo, he's certainly on of the group's hero and he was probably attracting the chicks to the group in concert with his good looks. The title track is a slow builder constructed around Biriaco's solid drumming and Tomasso's brooding bass work, Fasolli's sax and D'Andrea's piano just going with the flow.

Most of the flipside's tracks follow suit to the A-side (if you'll except the finale's dissonant improvised start) and in general it is relatively safe to say that apart of Sydney's guitar taking on a front role, Abbiamo is very close to be Azimut's carbon copy. And for me, if it's as good as Azimut, than Abbiamo is another easy 4 star album. Perigeo has their sound on their first two albums somewhere between Mwandishi, Miles Davis's Bitches Brew, Soft Machine circa 4 to 6, Nucleus and Iceberg, so if you like these, you can buy these eyes closed.

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Send comments to Sean Trane (BETA) | Report this review (#23149)
Posted Monday, March 01, 2004 | Review Permalink
Andrea Cortese
SPECIAL COLLABORATOR
Honorary Collaborator
3 stars Well, Perigeo is one of the classic and most important italian bands of this genre, along with "Area" and "Arti e Mestieri". Often regarded as the more refined, gentle and polite of the three, they produced their best known opus in 1973. Over 44 minutes of music, unusual for the italian classic scene. Nevetheless it's difficult for me to appreciate entirely their music 'cause, as you know, despite some of the most famous records, I don't know very well this genre. All I know is that this album has its moments of grandeur but is too jazzy for my personal tastes. I feel to lose any sense of direction 'cause its "simple complexity"! That' why, even after so many listenings, I hardly manage to appreciate it in the right way. So you won't read from me the usual "lobbying" for another italian band...actually, all I can say, it's that I find more easy and exciting the music of Arti e Mestieri, their "Tilt" in particular.

A refined work, worthy of special mention and to be included in any good jazz-rock fan's cd collection. Hardly a great favourite of mine, though... 3.5 stars.

So few reviews and ratings...I thought there were more jazz-rock freaks in this site...

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Send comments to Andrea Cortese (BETA) | Report this review (#95694)
Posted Wednesday, October 25, 2006 | Review Permalink
Mellotron Storm
PROG REVIEWER
4 stars 4.5 stars. What a pleasant surprise this turned out to be. I really like the atmosphere and experimental passages that bring WEATHER REPORT to mind but the similarities to that band end there.The guitar is outstanding and there are some good vocals as well on this album.

"Non C'e Tempo Da Perdere" opens with barely audible piano that builds as cymbals clash and vocals come in. Sax follows and then guitar all the while the piano and drums seem to be playing random almost dissonant notes and patterns. It stops completely as a new melody comes in at 4 minutes with vocals. Love the guitar before 5 minutes as piano and drums play on. A great opener. "Deja Vu" opens with piano as dissonant sax comes in. A new melody arrives a minute in with piano and sax leading the way in this mellow soundscape. It's dissonant 2 1/2 minutes in followed by piano, sax and vocals this time. Dissonant again late. "Rituale" opens with what sounds like shakers and percussion. Bass before 1 1/2 minutes is good. Piano joins in and we get a fuller sound after 2 minutes as sax joins in then guitar. So much going on here. Fantastic ! It settles after 5 1/2 minutes with some nice drum work followed by sax. "Abbiamo Tutti Un Blues Da Piangere" opens with some intricate acoustic guitar melodies as bass joins in. A melancholic mood is the result. Drums after 3 minutes then sax and piano. Nice. No awesome !

"Country" opens with those liquid keys before sax arrives after a minute. Sax and piano leads the way before 2 minutes. "Nadir" is the only song that the bass player didn't have a hand in composing. The keyboardist did this one. Electric piano to start then sax after a minute. Guitar 2 minutes in adds to the sound. "Vento, Pioggia E Sole" is the final track and my favourite, the longest as well pushing 10 minutes. Experimental sounds to open then dissonant sax before drums then piano then guitar follow. Very cool. The sax blasts away then guitar lets it rip after 3 minutes. Sax after 4 1/2 minutes as piano plays on. The sax is just wailing away 6 minutes in. The guitar is back 6 1/2 minutes in. Nice bass lines then the sax starts blasting again before 9 minutes. The piano is incredible here as well.

I'm so impressed with this band and look forward to checking out more from them. The music is almost as perfect as the album cover. Essential !

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Send comments to Mellotron Storm (BETA) | Report this review (#200764)
Posted Monday, January 26, 2009 | Review Permalink
4 stars This is some excellent space jazz psych prog from Italy that manages at times to be rather mind-blowing. I would make comparisons to Sensations' Fix, Santana (Caravanserai), Weather Report, Brainticket (mainly Celestial Ocean, also Psychonaut), Mahavishnu Orchestra, Popol Vuh, as well as to some Canterbury (Supersister, Soft Machine), Italian Jazz Prog (Picchio Dal Pozzo/Duello Madre/Dedalus), Funk, and Avant Garde (Henry Cow,...). Great album! I was hooked immediately!

My favorite song might be the entrancing opener "Non c'è Tempo da Perdere", but a lot of great stuff on this album. I like the first side a little more as the second drags a little at some points with more soft slow jazzy essays, though there is still a lot to like. A generally very inspired and very proficient jazzy atmosphere fusing influences from many styles, with a nice dose of psych.

I will update and elaborate this review and possibly the rating as I listen more to the album.

4.25 stars

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Send comments to listen (BETA) | Report this review (#220963)
Posted Saturday, June 13, 2009 | Review Permalink
Bonnek
SPECIAL COLLABORATOR
Prog Metal Team
4 stars The second Perigeo album continues where the debut left off, combining early Weather Report's mystic atmosphere with the occasional Mahavishnu shredding and a delicate Italian touch. The album confirms the potential of the debut but fails to surprise or to surpass the previous material.

The opening Non Tempo da Perdere is spot on though, a superb melodic fusion song with breakable dreamy vocals. Just as with the other Italian fusion supergroup Area I find the vocals to be one of the most attractive elements. Even if Giovanni Tommaso's sad-romantic vocals are entirely different from the crazed obsession of Area's Demetrio Stratos, they really add a special flavor to the band's sound.

The album offers a varied set of jazz pieces of which the lightly dissonant Deja Vu, the groovy Rituale and the dramatic title song are the best. Also the electric guitar and piano interplay of Nadir works out right, even if it is a bit derivative of Mahavishnu Orchestra. The closing Vento, Pioggia e Sole is a fairly standard fusion jam, lacking some of the melodious mastery of the other compositions but still inspired.

If you're on a mission to find new Italian fusion masters, Perigeo won't be your next Area but they are certainly a band with a personal sound, soulful playing and excellent song writing. At least their first two albums are a great addition to any fusion collection.

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Send comments to Bonnek (BETA) | Report this review (#308265)
Posted Thursday, November 04, 2010 | Review Permalink
4 stars Let me begin by saying I wrote this review after having only owned this album for a few weeks, and there may be that first flush of excitement to keep in mind as you read. On the other hand, I purchased it within a group of seventeen albums during an overseas trip, and this is the album I keep coming back to now, even months later.

Perigeo are a jazz-rock band from Rome who probably lean more toward the jazz side of things. While there is fiery electric soloing from Tony Sidney on some tracks, and some riff-work, it is more of an atmospheric rather than foot-stamping album (Although the outro to 'Rituale' cooks.) Instead, acoustic and electric piano, along with acoustic guitar, bass, sax and vocals, often create brooding soundscapes (like in opener 'Non c'é tempo da perdere') or even downright mournful moments like 'Déjà vu' - which makes highly effective use of acoustic piano.

Throughout the album 'Abbiamo tutti un blues da piangere' I hear flashes of 'Hot Rats', 'In A Silent Way' and others, but find them to be suggestive rather than derivative. Even the title track brought Van Morrison's 'Astral Weeks' to mind with the focus on band leader, singer and bassist Giovanni Tommas' soloing. Much more in line with the rock side of their sound, the rhythm instruments build 'Abbiamo...' effectively before a shrieking sax breaks in for a long solo, employing a familiar structure to rock audiences, and fusing it with the freer nature of jazz.

In general terms, parts of the album's second half are less impressive, with 'Country' and 'Nadir' coming across as a little too sparse for me. The closer, 'Vento, pioggia e sole' however, seems to fulfill the hints of 'Bitches Brew' that the album promises. Rockier than the Davis epic, it has a less shuffling and more driving rhythm beneath energetic soloing from the lead instruments, presented in a more hard bop 'trading off of solos' tradition. It's a stand out track, almost as satisfying as 'Rituale' or 'Abbiamo...' the other clear favourites.

Fans of the aforementioned albums should get definitely something out of this great record by Perigeo, which is a confident and emotive set of (mostly) instrumentals delivered with equal parts snap and subtlety. Well worth the investment, especially if you're looking to start exploring Jazz Rock.

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Send comments to dreadpirateroberts (BETA) | Report this review (#617270)
Posted Monday, January 23, 2012 | Review Permalink

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