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Robert Fripp - Let The Power Fall  CD (album) cover

LET THE POWER FALL

Robert Fripp

Eclectic Prog


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soundsweird
PROG REVIEWER
3 stars Similar in style to Fripp's collaborations with Brian Eno ("No Pussyfooting" and "Evening Star"), but without the synthesizers, this album features long slowly building tracks made up of looped guitar riffs. Done before the days of digital delay lines, Fripp used Eno's trick of using two reel-to-reel tape recorders in tandem, and then called it Frippertronics. So, each track starts with a note or two, then that plays back a few seconds later, while Fripp plays another note on top of it, and so on. Soon there's a "melody" of sorts, with layers of guitar built up into a wall of sound. Some tracks are quieter and somewhat "soothing", and some louder and a bit abrasive. King Crimson fans will recognize the various guitar sounds that Fripp employed at the time this was recorded (between "Red" and "Discipline"). Imagine a King Crimson song that consists of a slow, multi-tracked Fripp guitar solo. If that idea appeals to you, check this out.

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Send comments to soundsweird (BETA) | Report this review (#27116)
Posted Tuesday, March 15, 2005 | Review Permalink
Eetu Pellonpää
SPECIAL COLLABORATOR
Honorary Collaborator
3 stars Previous reviewer gives a good description about the music on this record. I would still note, that in my opinion FRIPP & ENO collaborations of the 70's were musically much better than Robert's own solo work presented here. But the idea of "a small, intelligent and mobile unit" producing live music is an interesting one, and these recordings documents the transition of these ideas as actions. Also if you play an electric guitar, this might be a good record to listen how Robert plays his instrument, as the non-synthesized sound is easier to recognize on these earlier frippertonics, than on his later "soundscape" material, which evolved from this playing technique. And at least with the CD version you get an essay, where Robert shares his views how world and people actually should run. How generous of him, one gin & frippertonic, please!

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Send comments to Eetu Pellonpää (BETA) | Report this review (#27117)
Posted Friday, April 01, 2005 | Review Permalink
Evolver
SPECIAL COLLABORATOR
Crossover & JazzRock/Fusion Teams
2 stars Let The Power Fail

This was the most disappointing Robert Fripp album to date.

On the previous release, "God Save The Queen/Under Heavy Manners", Fripp intoduced us to the soporific sound of "Frippertronics" as a complete art form. Where Fripp used this delay technique, using two tape recorders strung together with the single tape running across both heads, on "Exposure" as a wash effect behind some rather spectacular music, and as a brief intro Here Comes The Flood as an interesting production form, here, in it's raw form, it proves to be boring (sorry fot the run-on sentence).

You may choose to use this as background to meditation, and here you will find it's only truly useful application. The only other option is to play a game of figuring out which note Fripp adds on each loop. This game gets quite tedious after only a few short minutes, and could also end up with the listeners' brains melted and puddling at the bottom on the cranium.

Recommended only for fans of this genre.

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Send comments to Evolver (BETA) | Report this review (#442200)
Posted Tuesday, May 03, 2011 | Review Permalink
1 stars Let the Power Fall seems to be based on the novel 1984 of by George Orwell; a story about facism and power. The songs are titled 1984, 1985, etc... Robert Fripp shows his skills on the so-named Frippertronics. While these tunes are made by a guitar with taperecorders they sound synthesizer-like, creating a soundscape which could be used for meditation of for getting ready to bed.

If you like the sound of frippertronics or not, this record is totally out of proportion. There are no other sounds than frippertronics to be heard -there are even no other instruments to be heard- and because this is not the only record they appear on (frippertronics were already on Exposure) I thought about this record as a useles addition to my collection.

I'm a big fan of many works on wich Robert Fripp co-operated, especially the early King Crimson period, but this work does have so litle to offer that I'll give it just one star.

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Send comments to the philosopher (BETA) | Report this review (#489671)
Posted Sunday, July 24, 2011 | Review Permalink
friso
PROG REVIEWER
2 stars Robert Fripp - Let the Power fall (1981)

Robert Fripp is known as founding member and brain behind major progressive rock group King Crimson. Besides that he is known for experimenting with the electric guitar and the equipment available. Perhaps this is the definitive record if you like Robert Fripp's frippertronics, but it has nothing else to offer then just that.

Frippertronics could be described as use for electronic equipment and electric guitar in order to create repetitive loops that allow for adding one note every loop. This results in endless loops of about six seconds with minor changes of single electric guitar notes that sound as if played by a cheap synthesizer. With this technique Robert Fripp managed to fill a record (without any other musicians or instruments). All compositions sounds the same and evolve in same way. This often results in sound-scape-like creations that don't have to much emotional depth, whilst offering some concentration and non-threatening atmospheres. There is no variety in approach and sound of the guitar on this album. Furthermore I assume all compositions are played in one take, where the addition of a 'normal' guitar line would not have hurt at all. Actually, this album just sounds like standing in a mad, but static scientist's laboratory without sounding psychedelic.

Conclusion. Unless you really want to know what frippertronics are I can recommend spending your money elsewhere. Later sound-scape albums of Robert Fripp are said to be way more interesting and this one just doesn't make too much sense. Two stars.

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Send comments to friso (BETA) | Report this review (#499556)
Posted Monday, August 08, 2011 | Review Permalink

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