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Mad Crayon - Preda CD (album) cover

PREDA

Mad Crayon

 

Rock Progressivo Italiano

3.88 | 30 ratings

From Progarchives.com, the ultimate progressive rock music website

BrufordFreak
4 stars RPI and prog lovers in general: You're missing some GREAT music if you haven't heard Predo! These guys can play. Discovered through the HIGHLY RECOMMENDED Colossus Project "Kalevala: A Finnish Progressive Rock Epic" I have been blown away by the freshness and clarity of this music. Recorded so cleanly, using so many sounds in such unusual combinations, and constructed with such nuance and unpredictability it is a true listening adventure. (Put on the headphones!) Lots of piano and acoustic guitars, crisp drumming, and bass playing that is so alluring as to constantly draw my attention from the rest of the ensemblature. One very noticeable element of Predo's recording is the wonderful and brilliant use of space within the music; they don't fill every second for the sake of filling space; they let the sounds, chords, and melodies seep, percolate and fill your soul. And the singing is in Italian!

 "Re Schiavo--Part 1" is, at times, somewhat on the rock edge, kind of like SAGA, yet other times the bass and piano inerplay reminds one of a jazz CHICK COREA jazz concert. The drum playing is very solid, if mixed a bit in the background. 7/10

 "Preda--Part 1" starts with a TONY LEVIN-esque funk bass line before turning into an intermittently hard rocking, sometimes 'lounge' feeling, sometimes JEFF BECK-feeling piece. Also has a SYLVAN "Force of Gravity" feel to it. Definitely defies eras and music styles. Love the bass playing (PINO PALLADINO-ish?) 7/10

 "Preda--Part 2" begins with some heavy guitar riffing and steamy organ soloing playing over the same jazzy bass playing and solid drumwork from "Part 1" before segueing into some soli from some pretty unusual synth and guitar sounds. The three minute mark reintroduces a kind of 'light metal' theme over BRUFORD-esqu snare, then suddenly a lounge jazz piano shows up to solo over this driving theme. A brief, strange and unpredictable lull with some treated vocals appears just before the song exits with its original driving pace. Interesting song, to say the least! 6/10

 "Gabriel" enters with a softer feel, piano lead, and moves quickly into a complicated and tempo-rolling vocal section. Here is where this group's compositional use of space, pause, and sustain really show itself. Brilliant. To my mind, this shows great courage, confidence and maturity. My favorite instrument of this group, Daniele Vitalone's fretless bass gets a very cool fusion solo (EBERHARD WEBER?) at the 3:50 minute mark before the song surprises with a brief foray into high energy guitar chords and solo. The song decays beautifully with synth and piano outro. Wonderful song-writing filled with many catchy, though often all-too brief melodies. Like a train ride in the mountains: alternating lulls and breathtaking views. 8/10

 "Xaonon" is the song that really got me hooked on this group. A real Neo-Prog bordering on eclectic classic. The only thing missing are the English vocals (I keep expecting the song to evolve into a MOONGARDEN classic like "Round Midnight"). Begins with one and a half minutes of very fresh electronica before the rhythm section joins in. Kind of like OZRIC TENTACLES plays TANGERINE DREAM. Then the 3:00 minute mark introduces some 'light metal' themes, sounding a lot like RIVERSIDE, before backing down to a kind of ARGENT-sounding organ-with-guitar and rhythm section. The changes in this song are so frequent, so unpredictable, and so delightful. These are some very disciplined musicians! 9/10

 "Isola di Sara" is another gem/highlight beginning with a surprising 'Buddha Lounge' like feel before spiking off into various unusual and unpredictable sound and tempo directions. Very difficult to describe; you simply must discover it for yourself. The 2:05 marks notes the all-too-brief introduction of the song's immensely engaging and melodic 'chorus.' The band is so tight, the vocals so moving! 4:00 4:20 an entirely Latin flavored acoustic guitar-led section 5:15 a segue into a more rocking variation on the chorus theme before bridging back to the true chorus?which then evolves into a brief and beautiful piano solo before down-shifting into a kind of lounge end which is not the end at all but merely a transition to some HACKETT-esque volume pedal notes fading out over the bass's ad libbing. Wow! What a beautiful ride! 10/10

 "Sovrano Dell'illusione--Part 1" begins with some ELP/PFM-ish piano before stopping to make space for the second beginning--a very GENESIS-like mellotron-washed section. But this section too yields, ends, to allow the introduction of a very PFM-like acoustically accompanied vocal section. Absolutely gorgeous music, melody, and singing! The EMERSON-piano returns at the 3:35 mark to provide the base for the return of the vocals. Stunning songwriting! As good as any PFM high points that I've ever heard. 5:05 marks the emergence of a beautiful synth sound soloing briefly before the music settles back to the vocal with piano/acoustic guitar outro. 10/10

 "Sovrano Dell'illusione--Part 2" uses electric piano and echoing bass to provide its initial ominous jazzy feel. Again images of EBERHARD WEBER's works are conjured until the 2:40 marks the introduction of some skillful EDDIE VAN HALEN-sounding guitar chord playing bursts onto the scene. It disappears for a gap of a few seconds during which a few strange sentences are uttered, then comes back with a vengeance as synths and guitar soli emote themselves. 6:20 change: Mellotron and bass pedals! Then another odd shift into distorted electric guitar arpeggios over which the very strange vocals re-emerge until the music and vocals suddenly shift, mid-stream, to a very dreamy, melodic feel, back to guitar arpeggios which literally fadeout as a SATIE-like solo piano takes over. What an amazing rollercoaster ride! Mellotron! Weird background noises! The end! Wow! 9/10

 The final song, "Re Schiavo--Part 2" begins with a piano reiteration of now-familiar themes--again very SATIE--esque. New themes are introduced at 1:00, 1:10, and 1:15 as the vocals commence. Multi-voiced chorus harmonies precede a beautiful section in which a TONY BANKS-like synth solo performs over acoustic guitars, fretless bass, and quiet batterie--leading to the final, brief vocal recitation and piano fadeout. Beautiful. 9/10

 Seriously, folks: Check out this album! They need to be discovered and promoted. I bet their concerts would be amazing: Musically, kind of like the early Gabriel-era GENESIS shows without the theatrics. Four and a half stars (and growing!)

BrufordFreak | 4/5 |

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