Header
Tomorrow - Tomorrow CD (album) cover

TOMORROW

Tomorrow

 

Proto-Prog

2.81 | 46 ratings

From Progarchives.com, the ultimate progressive rock music website

Easy Livin
Special Collaborator
Honorary Collaborator / Retired Admin
2 stars Howe it was yesterday

Tomorrow were an early "supergroup" in reverse, in that the band members went on to find fame and fortune elsewhere. The main interest from a prog perspective is Steve Howe's (YES) involvement in the short lived project. The band evolved from a soul covers band by the name of The In Crowd, intent on writing an playing their own material. They were however also very conscious of their image (Yes, even Steve!), their audience being present as much for what they saw as what they heard.

The music is based in the psychedelic era of the late 1960's, and is best described now using words such as dated and primitive. It is not as dynamic or as exciting as Syd Barrett's Pink Floyd, not as commercial as the Bee Gees, and the songs do not have the strength of the Beatles. These though are among the main influences upon Tomorrow, they even cover "Strawberry Fields forever" here.

The opening track "My white bicycle" was a minor hit for the band, and later successfully covered by Narazeth. It is a catchy piece of psych pop, but hardly ground breaking. The rest of the tracks are charming but rather forgettable, descending to a low on the "Laughing gnome" like "Three jolly little dwarfs". "Now your time has come" is the only song with any semblance of complexity, the track featuring the first hints of Howe's distinctive guitar sound in a reasonably long guitar break.

If we are honest, the sole interest here is Howe's involvement. Do not however expect to hear much virtuoso guitar work, Howe is kept very much in check, providing electric rhythm guitar only. Keith West, the vocalist with the band, would enjoy solo commercial success while the band were still an operating unit with his "Excerpt form a teenage opera", and this would lead to the early demise of Tomorrow after just one album.

In all, an inoffensive pop album from the late 1960's, which may be of interest to those looking to find Steve Howe's earliest work. By no means essential though.

Easy Livin | 2/5 |

MEMBERS LOGIN ZONE

As a registered member (register here if not), you can post rating/reviews (& edit later), comments reviews and submit new albums.

You are not logged, please complete authentication before continuing (use forum credentials).

Share this TOMORROW review

>

Review related links

Copyright Prog Archives, All rights reserved. | Legal Notice | Privacy Policy | Advertise | GeoIP Services by MaxMind | RSS + syndications

Other sites in the MAC network: JazzMusicArchives.com — the ultimate jazz music virtual community | MetalMusicArchives.com — the ultimate metal music virtual community


Server processing time: 0.02 seconds