Progarchives, the progressive rock ultimate discography
David Gilmour - Rattle That Lock CD (album) cover

RATTLE THAT LOCK

David Gilmour

 

Prog Related

3.42 | 228 ratings

From Progarchives.com, the ultimate progressive rock music website

SteveG
3 stars Some things, aside from scotch, do age well.

Rattle that lock is the forth solo album from renowned Floyd guitarist David Gilmour. And folks, it's not bad. Not bad at all.

Everyone by now should know the bombastic single and title track and I'm happy to say that Rattle That Lock is not representative of the album's other songs. Most of the tunes are in a slow tempo blues groove and display some of Gilmour's best guitar work outside of Pink Floyd. The Endless River sessions must have rejuvenated Gilmour's drive and this album does contain some signature Floydian motifs such as background dialogue and the now familiar opening 'Fanfare' of an instrumental Gilmour launching the album with a bluesy/jazzy guitar opener underpinned with Rick Wright like synths called 5:AM before Gilmour and company launch into the title track proper.

After the funk of Rattle That Lock dies off, David sings convincingly on Faces of Stone and A Boat Lies Waiting, two of three songs that sound like they could be cuts off his last album On An Island, in that Mrs. Gilmour has penned some more "bless this day" lyrics to go along with these mid tempo songs. The main difference is that David actually sounds enthusiastic about these songs and shows it with terrific guitar playing with vocals that actually have life in them.

Dancing Right In Front of Me returns Gilmour to a blues shuffle which is broken up nicely on the following song In Any Tongue. An anti war themed number that lacks the gravitas of lyrics penned by Roger Waters, but shows off Gilmour's majestic electric leads on the song's coda that rivals some of his finest moments with Pink Floyd and are the album's highlight.

Beauty is another instrumental that features Gilmour again on pedal steel with more Floyd like guitar riffs and tone with synths and piano again underpinning the song. Gilmour still conjures up more wonderfully melodic lines and clearly shows that his nearly seventy yeas of age have only added to his abilities to compose tasteful licks.

The Girl In The Yellow Dress is a corny jazz pastiche that comes complete with brushed drums, steamy sax and lounge lizard keys courtesy of Jules Holland. It's the album's low point.

Today is another Polly Sampson "bless this day" song with the word day actually in the lyrics this time. Gilmour lays down a funky bass groove that's almost irresistible along with soulful female vocals, that really saves this tune from being another boring castoff from On An Island.

The album closer is another instrumental with a wistful longing quality that again show's off Gilmour at his best. One great ascending guitar note after another until the song dissolves in a wash of acoustic guitar notes and the only sound left is that of a crackling fire.

In the canon of Gilmour solo works, I rank this third after his self titled debut and the follower About Face, but place it ten steps further up the hill than On An Island. If anyone was expecting something new and exciting from Gilmour, well, that's being a bit optimistic, to say the least. Is this album essential for Gilmour and Floyd fans? I think not, but you could do worse as it's better than The Endless River by leaps and bounds. 3.5 stars, actually, due to the album's punchier production than On An Island.

SteveG | 3/5 |

MEMBERS LOGIN ZONE

As a registered member (register here if not), you can post rating/reviews (& edit later), comments reviews and submit new albums.

You are not logged, please complete authentication before continuing (use forum credentials).

Forum user
Forum password

Share this DAVID GILMOUR review

Social review comments () BETA







Review related links

Copyright Prog Archives, All rights reserved. | Legal Notice | Privacy Policy | Advertise | RSS + syndications

Other sites in the MAC network: JazzMusicArchives.com — jazz music reviews and archives | MetalMusicArchives.com — metal music reviews and archives

Donate monthly and keep PA fast-loading and ad-free forever.