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Edensong - Years in the Garden of Years CD (album) cover

YEARS IN THE GARDEN OF YEARS

Edensong

 

Eclectic Prog

3.99 | 154 ratings

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ElChanclas
4 stars After listening to this album around 10-12 times in the past 5 days I can properly ask why isn't this band like HUGE1? Sorry, that's my Jethro Tull fan side searching for unanswerable questions. I can't remember how I got to this album but I know that when I saw that cover exploration was mandatory! Very fortunate for me because not only was I correct judging the book by its cover, I am also hooked forever because the music here is simply fantastic. Moving forward to the review, this album consists of mainly three tracks:an opener, an epic suite with eight parts, and a closer. Medieval Celtic-like melodies kick off with Cold City, with a very suitable metal edge and all the gadgets from symphonic prog (flutes, Hammonds, atoned guitar licks and flawless rhythmic section. James's vocals almost bring the music to a more conventional set up, but it ends up being just a minor tease, prog is all over the place, in all forms and definitely very eclectic, and the flute work is outstanding, as well as the double bass drumming with a very theatrical and kind of ritual ending. Years in the Garden of Years, the title track and center epic for the album I. End Times in Retrospect starts as a mellow acoustic and atmospheric track, still on the same melodic mood, accessible but dark, with celestial cellos and a change of tempo that will catch the listener immediately. Chaotic keyboards lead to a flute solo accompanied by flawless bass and drums, similar to what you would expect from a modern Tull album with a progressive metal side to it. Beautiful. II. In the Longest of Days. The single (radio version I guess) blends in with catchy vocal melodies and a more commercial approach to the musical crafting. This is a tune you will be humming to after the first listen, then singing out loud after second listen, then forever inserted in your brain after third listen, that's it. I haven't really heard properly anything from Dream Theater yet, except for some classics, but I do hear some of its influence here. Symphonic Progressive metal prog? The various synth layers are phenomenal, hooks and choruses memorable, era worm melodies for sure. III. The Hollowed. Seroff's flute playing is particularly enchanting, unquestionably influenced by the 70's scene and incredibly suiting for this album. Acoustic guitars and very emotional vocals (and lyrics) take over for the first half of the song until Waldman's percussion and invited cellos start defining a louder environment for the power ballad, which obviously has also its unexpected moments, like those where frenetic piano interrupts setting base for more exquisite flute and cello interaction, really majestic and enchanting. Impossible a better melodic ending for this part of the epic. IV. Down the Hours is probably the darkest and heaviest part of YITGOY, even the flute is that dark and powerful and the upper tempo is very enjoyable, mellotron Vs progressive metal guitars, some uncommon shredding and then some heavy cellos. I can't be the only one in love with this music, right? This is a fantastic piece of art, exceptionally executed. V. Chronos, one of my favorite passages with that sort of bossanova at the beginning and the majestic flute soloing and fairy tale piano playing. But when the metal kicks its when everything arrives to that next level, again all instruments interact together creating this fast symphonic metal orchestration that its hard to evade or ignore, 9 minutes of progressive melodic madness, sad, happy, dark, bright, fast and furious and mostly instrumental, intermezzo for the impressive epic. The very quite and almost playful last seconds help change the mood for the second half of the title track. VI. Generations. Fat bass and "British" sounding vocals connect with the listener through the lyrics and their melodies but for a short period, with a spatial feel that preludes something powerful is about to happen, The Apocalypse? VII. The Atman Apocalypse. Power metal, cello and flute enhanced, but this is power metal I its core with even some hints of heavy prog or heavy Neo prog on the guitar riffing, its amazing how guitars and keys understand each other so well. But this specific song has its better moments in the rhythmic section, flawlessly supporting the symphonic columns. So we better conclude that this is the result when s band like Jethro Tull and Dream Theater/Symphony X collide, powerful, melodic, complex and very very symphonic. VIII. Regenerations. This is how the epic center piece for the album comes to an end, very mellow and melancholic, same feeling we experience on the last day of a trip, reliving the memorable moments but knowing there's nothing there's no more, at least for a while. 5 plus minutes of very close storytelling with little percussion but tons of guitar and keys arrangements before returning to the full band explosion with a mid tempo vibe and virtuoso synth playing. Flutes and cellos on the back, with bass, drums and guitars teasing with a more doom metal tone, until it just fades away. Yawn of a blink, what a unique song title. A little more complex and messy than Cold City but blending almost every mood we have heard in the past 65minutes, powerful vocals, metal riffing, minstrel sounding guitars, the backing cellos, the double bass drumming, the leading flute soloing and, why not, some twin guitar battle and symphonic key and flutes that melodically bring balance to the last moments of the record. The END!

ElChanclas | 4/5 |

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