Progarchives, the progressive rock ultimate discography

EDENSONG

Eclectic Prog • United States


From Progarchives.com, the ultimate progressive rock music website

Edensong picture
Edensong biography
US band Edensong has a history that goes back to the progressive metal band Echoes of Eden, an active unit back in the 1990's featuring Benjamin Wigler, Tony Waldman, Alex Hornbake and James Byron Schoen. When that band disbanded, following the release of a solitary album, Schoen decided to form a new band in the fall of 2002, alongside Matt Cozin (drums). Fellow Echoes of Eden member Ben Wigler subsequently joined.The three worked on new material, as well as old Echoes of Eden material, but after a short while Ben left the band.

James and Matt moved on and decided to develop 3 hours of what they called 'surrealistic pseudo-rock-opera', involving a lot of the music they wrote earlier. They joined forces with some other musicians, Ian Carbone (bass), Aurora Maoz (flute), and Asa Sourdiffe (violin, keyboard). The initial performance in April 2003 motivated the band to go on a live tour, but the rehearsal schedule and antics involved in this "Beyond Eden" project was too much for Aurora and Asa, who were replaced by Rachel Kiel (flute) and Mike Drucker (violin). After touring, this line up started working on the material that would eventually become the debut album "The Fruit Fallen". During the work, Arthur Sugen joined on piano and organ, and Ian Carbone was replaced by T.D. Towers on bass.

In 2005 and 2006 the band played an extensive list of live shows for a growing amount of followers, but in the spring 2006 the tensions of touring led to a complete band break up.
James Byron Schoen found himself alone, and focused again on getting the album done. All material recorded when the band was still together needed to be mixed, and remixed (with an occasional overdub). In October 2007 "The Fruit Fallen" was mastered by Bob Katz then released in the summer of 2008. The album provides an outtake of material developed throughout the various band line ups, and was recorded before the band disbanded. After the release, James started working on getting together a new band to tour with and promote the material. This new version of the band eventually settled with Schoen joined by his old band mate from Echoes of Eden, Tony Waldman (drums), alongside previous Edensong member TD Towers (bass) and new recruits Stefan Paolini (keyboards) and Barry Seroff (flute).

Come 2009 and Edensong was booked to perform at the progressive rock festivals Progday and The Three Rivers progressive rock festival, and the following year they were booked for the Cana...
read more

Edensong official website

EDENSONG MP3, Free Download (music stream)


Open extended player in a new pop-up window | Random Playlist (50) | How to submit new MP3s

EDENSONG forum topics / tours, shows & news


EDENSONG forum topics Create a topic now
EDENSONG tours, shows & news Post an entries now

EDENSONG Videos (YouTube and more)


Showing only random 3 | Show all EDENSONG videos (3) | Search and add more videos to EDENSONG

Buy EDENSONG Music


Years in the Garden of YearsYears in the Garden of Years
Laser's Edge 2016
Audio CD$11.54
$11.56 (used)
The Fruit FallenThe Fruit Fallen
CD Baby 2016
Audio CD$9.99
$5.00 (used)
Echoes of Edensong: From the Studio & Stage by Edensong (2013-08-03)Echoes of Edensong: From the Studio & Stage by Edensong (2013-08-03)
CD Baby
Audio CD$52.70
The Fruit Fallen by Edensong (2013-08-03)The Fruit Fallen by Edensong (2013-08-03)
CD BABY.COM/INDYS
Audio CD$58.80
Echoes of Edensong: From the Studio & StageEchoes of Edensong: From the Studio & Stage
CD Baby 2010
Audio CD$7.91
$7.90 (used)
Right Now on Ebay (logo)

More places to buy EDENSONG music online Buy EDENSONG & Prog Rock Digital Music online:
EDENSONG has no upcoming shows, according to LAST.FM syndicated events and shows feed

EDENSONG discography


Ordered by release date | Showing ratings (top albums) | Help Progarchives.com to complete the discography and add albums

EDENSONG top albums (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

3.38 | 40 ratings
The Fruit Fallen
2008
4.23 | 40 ratings
Years in the Garden of Years
2016

EDENSONG Live Albums (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

EDENSONG Videos (DVD, Blu-ray, VHS etc)

EDENSONG Boxset & Compilations (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

3.58 | 13 ratings
Echoes of Edensong
2010

EDENSONG Official Singles, EPs, Fan Club & Promo (CD, EP/LP, MC, Digital Media Download)

EDENSONG Reviews


Showing last 10 reviews only
 Years in the Garden of Years by EDENSONG album cover Studio Album, 2016
4.23 | 40 ratings

BUY
Years in the Garden of Years
Edensong Eclectic Prog

Review by tszirmay
Special Collaborator Crossover Team

5 stars Edensong very kindly suggested that I review this album, for which I was flattered as anything prog-metal is out of my league. In fact, I may be ridiculed by some fans for not owning any Dream Theater albums but so is taste, open to ever ending debate. I never had any kind of affinity for technical displays of instrumental prowess (unless in a live form, where you can SEE the effort). I am a moody guy and, like any good astronaut, I need all kinds of atmosphere to get my rockets firing. Joking aside, I took upon myself to be as objective possible and eliminate the tinkering with paralleling DT, which I am sure Edensong is not that anxious to oblige. "Years in the Garden of Years" is the title of this sophomore opus , a 70 minute behemoth of definitely progressive rock and having no prior knowledge of this group, here are the members: James Byron Schoen mans the guitars and vocals, Tony Waldman plays drums, percussion and BG vocals, Stefan Paolini fingers the keyboards, BG vocals, T.D. Towers provides the bass, BG vocals and Barry Seroff the flute.

So with an open mind and freshly q-tipped ears, I sat down and gave this a completely devoted audition as "Cold City" tumbles out of my hot speakers, I cannot help being immediately drawn to two rather overt impressions: Tony Waldman is a wild man on drums and percussion, playing technically complex one second and craftily nuanced the next, apparently at the drop of a hat. Secondly, the flute has a rather preponderant role in Edensong and does not serve as some banal side dish, just to add flavor, but rather as a de facto vital cog in the instrumental machine. A slight medieval opener that saunters to the next level, propelled by the lightning guitar assaults that are paralleled by the beastly rhythmic onslaught. Guitarist Schoen carves with a stinging tone, like some metallic wasp gone berserk. The various keys used by Paolini serve to illustrate new sonic orchestrations, yet using a fair amount of soloing

Then comes the whopper of all whoppers: an eight-part extravaganza based on the title and its theme of time and circumstance. The entirely instrumental "End Times" begins quietly enough, strumming acoustic guitar and luxuriant cello, when suddenly the staccato drumming, some harsh guitar and insistent piano all forge a common alliance , one of utmost urgency and insistence. It segues nicely into "In the Longest of Days" where the vocals take over, tinkling e-piano (that is killer) in the background. Things get ghostlier with the spectral "The Hallowed", a somber feast of cello, flute and percussion that could have emanated from the first crusade, a campfire of knights heading to Jerusalem, a forlorn acoustic guitar stunningly beautiful and sublimely melodic, a fragile voice doused with lavish despondency intoning the pain of 'his cries were so alone', supplementary cello and flute attempt to 'console the laughter' and thus 'the pain begins'. A shimmering mood of expert melancholy that eventually gets hot and heavy, espousing a contained anger that surges over the soul. This is a tremendously entertaining slice of prog rock, as sweeping piano, choral orchestrations and profound sonic resolve impose their will. This is definitely not prog metal by any stretch, much more modern symphonic with medieval tinges and a vivid contrast of both time and essence.

Technical connoisseurs need not worry as "Down the Hours" spirals into the stratosphere, still occasionally resting in warm pools of atonal melancholy, before resuming the wild ride, again fueled by Waldman's athletic propulsion. Seroff's handles the flute with adamant abandon, until guitarist Schoen takes over the spotlight and begins chugging rather furiously, a flick of a talented wrist and nimble fingers that grope the fretboard with lewd assertion, this is quite a revealing display. An electronic-tinged intermezzo serves as a studied outro. The highlight track must be the vocal-less "Chronos", a 9 minute musical consecration, incorporating all the ingredients that are unique to this masterpiece, furrowed by the penetrating bass rumble of TD Towers, who muscles the arrangement into a sturdier display of tectonic prog, muscular drums pounding away, the flute fluttering, the cello churning and the 'kettle almost boiling', this could easily have passed as vintage Jethro Tull on Passion Play steroids, with a dose of insanity to boot! Paolini's keys create superb colorations and Tony '2Toes' is 'moving with authority' as he strikes the skins with audacious intensity. The percussive solo is phenomenal, allying Japanese-like disposition with fragile instruments and expanding the atmosphere beyond space and time.

The bass first harrumphs like some burping politico, chain-saw guitar ramblings scorching the background, as the voice laments on "Generations", a perfect set-up for the second winner here , the brilliant "Atman Apocalypse" a heavily King Crimson (David Cross version)-like intro that evolves into a panorama of musical expression, with tinges of raging deliverance, roller coaster rhythmic swells (Waldman again) and careening valleys, screeching synths that scratch the mind, all combining for a savage ride. There is a nearly 'Supper's Ready'- like feel, what with all the tonal dramatics, the theatricality of the arrangement and the quirky vocals. I was impressed and taken by the first run through, incredibly aroused by the powerful conveyance of such great prog standards that we all know and love. Its fast, slow, hard and soft, all wrapped in some symphonic veil and progressive filigree. The pedal stays firmly on the turbocharger as the finale of the 8 part suite kicks in, as "Regenerations" rekindle earlier pleasures of delicate sound and eventual thunder, buoyed by immense orchestrations, subtle acoustic guitar interventions and passionate vocals drenched in sorrow, cello in tow. Labyrinthine energy, compositional creativity, instrumental efficiency. The mellotron-drenched ending is unadulterated pulling at the heartstrings, Tony sadly bashing his drum kit, the orchestrations traversed by sizzling synth stabbings, this is just perfect music, period. I actually applauded when I first heard this track end.

The sandwiched opus finishes with the deliberate "Yawn of a Blink", a raucous adventure that has these little details that add pleasure to the pain, such as those metallic harpsichord sounds, the volcanic Waldman fills, a scouring organ foray and echoed vocals that showcase both resolve and anguish. Flute hands off to e-guitar, and both go headed straight to the end zone, smilingly waiting for the black and white dude to signal touchdown! Yes, indeed.

Perhaps not being tainted with any kind of prejudgment has helped me in my enjoyment and subsequent review, all I can say is that this is pretty special stuff indeed that thoroughly deserves a much wider audience, certainly in view of the incredible amount of variety, interest and research that went into this labour of love. One thing is for sure though, this isn't Dream Theater! Along with fellow New Yorkers Circuline, the state of US prog is fantastic. Lets fix their politics soon , please.

5 orchard of ages

 Years in the Garden of Years by EDENSONG album cover Studio Album, 2016
4.23 | 40 ratings

BUY
Years in the Garden of Years
Edensong Eclectic Prog

Review by Windhawk
Special Collaborator Honorary Collaborator

4 stars US band EDENSONG is a project that was in development from 2002 and onward, eventually releasing their debut album "Fruit of the Fallen" in 2008, a production that was followed by the EP "Echoes of Edensong" two years later. "Years in the Garden of Years" is their sophomore full length studio album, and was released through renowned US label Laser's Edge in the fall of 2016.

Back in the spring of 2013 I sat in an apartment in Brooklyn and listened to just shy of half an hour of material that was in the works for this album. I cannot recall the specific details of that listening session, but it was a fun and interesting manner in which to conclude a weekend in New York City before traveling on to meet other friends stateside. I had stayed with drummer Tony Waldman for part of that weekend, and we've been in touch on a fairly regular basis ever since. He was passionate about the qualities of the forthcoming Edensong album even back then, and from what I can recall the band have worked quite a bit to add some quality finishing touches to the songs at hand here.

As with many other progressive rock bands, Edensong's take on the genre is one that is hard to pin down. They appear to have something of a passionate interest in progressive folk rock of the kind that Jethro Tull made a career out of, and traces and echoes of that band can be found on numerous occasions throughout. Not merely due to the liberal use of flute soloing, but also in certain structural elements unless I'm much mistaken. That there are passages that comes across as something of a bastard child of Jethro Tull and Dream Theater is perhaps and indication of just how extensive the palette Edensong use is, although the more clear cut metal-oriented themes and passages strictly speaking is a minority feature on this CD. Very much present, but not in a dominant manner.

There's a lot of what I'd describe as hard prog present however. Quite a few classic guitar riff and organ combinations, but also various combinations of bass, piano and guitar creating a firm, hard sound that is vibrant and tension filled. That these may alternate with gentler passages of a more pastoral character as well as more dramatic and sweeping ones with more of a clear cut symphonic progressive expression again an indication of variety and versatility I guess. Add in occasional lapses into what I'd describe as a chamber rock oriented style, as well occasional details here and there that possibly have more of an avant tinge to them, and you do end up with an album that can proudly be described as eclectic in scope as well as character.

A special remark is merited for the final third of the impressively flexible instrumental Chronos, as what I'd hazard a guess at being Japanese inspired percussion and instrument details most certainly adds a distinct mood and flavor to those sequences. I would also guess that these details were directly or indirectly provided by drummer Tony, who knows a thing or two about Japanese culture.

"Years in the Garden of Years" is undeniably a progressive rock album, one of those productions placed so much in the center of that universe that it cannot be mistaken for anything else. It's eclectic, filled with variety, and feature enough alterations and changes in tempo and arrangements to keep even a jaded progger happy. The compositions are well worked out too, with excellent mix and production as the icing on the cake. A CD easy to recommend to any progressive rock fan with a taste for the eclectic and more adventurous parts of the progressive rock universe.

 The Fruit Fallen by EDENSONG album cover Studio Album, 2008
3.38 | 40 ratings

BUY
The Fruit Fallen
Edensong Eclectic Prog

Review by apps79
Special Collaborator Honorary Collaborator

2 stars Edensong were formed by two students at Wesleyan University in Middletown, Connecticut in 2002, drummer Matt Cozin, and singer/guitarist James Schoen, soon to be joined by guitarist Ben Wigler.With the help of some additional musicians they performed the ambitious Rock Opera ''Beyond Eden'' the next year.After graduating from Wesleyan University, Schoen along with a semi-refreshed line-up focused on writing and recording material for Edensong's official debut, but tensions among the members led to the band's demise in 2006.Left alone, Schoen decided to add the final touches of an almost finished album, completing the mix and mastering of it with the help of engineer Bob Katz.''The Fruit Fallen'' was its title and it was eventually released independently in 2008.

Edensong drew influences from Classic 70's Prog as well as modern Heavy Prog and even Progressive Metal to offer an album full of changing atmospheres and soundscapes.Flutes play a dominant role in Edensong's music, reasonably recalling JETHRO TULL, while the violins and organ parts resemble to KANSAS' progressive years.These vintage inspirations are combined with plenty of acoustic parts and followed by more intense and heavier moments, featuring a really powerful rhythm section and very sharp guitars.The style contains a heavy dose of symphonic-inclined Progressive Rock with balanced Heavy Prog/Metal elements and atmospheric Acoustic Music with a folky flavor.However the material lacks consistency, despite having a very rich and irritating approach.The vocal parts are of an acquired taste, lacking an attractive color, while the blend of the styles sounds far from tight and rather abstract.Additionally the album suffers from the abscence of melodies tightly linked with its symphonic nature, while most of the tracks remain forgettable after several listenings.Even the last track, entitled ''The Reunion'', is considered as a 22-min. epic, but the truth is that these are two separate tracks split with a very long pause of silence, in a move that actually makes no sense.Ironically the music on ''The Reunion'' makes sense, being the two strongest pieces of ''The Fruit Fallen'', sounding tight, well-arranged with nice shifting moods, good interplays and a bit more memorable themes.

These kind of albums tend to be the hugest dissapointment.All the right components are here (varied instrumentation, balanced vocal and instrumental textures, technical sufficiency), but the final result sounds as a package of unrelated pieces...2.5 stars.

 Echoes of Edensong by EDENSONG album cover Boxset/Compilation, 2010
3.58 | 13 ratings

BUY
Echoes of Edensong
Edensong Eclectic Prog

Review by usa prog music

3 stars My first exposure to Edensong came in a flood of new material that was the Haiti Projekt. Released earlier this year, it contained 40 songs from 40 different bands and the proceeds were donated to help the people of Haiti after that tragic earthquake. As you can imagine, with that many songs by that many different bands, it was easy for many of them to sort of blur together for a number of listens. One of the immediate standouts, though, was an Edensong track called "Lorelai." Their name was instantly added to my "groups to check out" list. When I heard their latest release, Echoes of Edensong, I have to confess I was at first put off by how different the other five tracks on this almost-album/almost-EP were from "Lorelai," (which is also included on the release). Not that I expected them to all be the same, but the light touch of the orchestration in the very mellow, almost dream-like "Lorelai" makes the more hard-hitting nature of songs like "Beneath the Tide" and "To See but not Believe" sound like they were done by a totally different, but equally good band. But that's the great thing about this kind of music, isn't it?

The opener of the album is "Beneath the Tide," and after giving it a few listens to get used to its various arrangement quirks, I think it's an amazing tune. An album's worth of great musical ideas packed into ten minutes, and it all seems to work. "Beneath the Tide" and "Lorelai" make Echoes of Edensong a worthwhile investment on their own.

The third track, "To See But Not Believe" has some great moments, as well. The recording quality of this song is a bit sharper than the first two, but the vocals don't seem quite strong enough to be as loud as they are in the mix.

The remaining three tracks are live cuts?including a live version of the album opener? recorded at various festivals the band has played over the past few years. The recording quality isn't top notch, which is explained in the on-liner notes, but it's not bad at all. The tracks reveal that Edensong is a strong live act. (Random aside: I want credit for inventing the phrase "on-liner notes," which is when, instead of including credits with the album artwork, everything is put up on a website.) Again, I think the vocals aren't as strong as they could be, but the playing, for the most part, is spot on.

Echoes of Edensong is not only, as it is billed in the credits, a snack to tide-over existing fans until the next full release, but also it's a great introduction to the band. Definitely a rewarding listen.

 The Fruit Fallen by EDENSONG album cover Studio Album, 2008
3.38 | 40 ratings

BUY
The Fruit Fallen
Edensong Eclectic Prog

Review by usa prog music

3 stars While you're mesmerized by its binding, this melodic werewolf may get an opportunity to take a bite out of your hide. In other words, the slipcase is exquisite as it's a realistic-looking but ersatz book. Also clipped within its lip is aesthetically-pleasing liner notes laminated with a protective sheen. Not to mention, this Necronomicon of sound is stunning and precarious as soon as it's ajar.

Edensong has developed a style that brings many adjectives to mind: For starters, their sundry material is organic, orchestral, acoustic, accessible, gothic, and tetchy. It's as if they've combined Jethro Tull with Porcupine Tree. Like Aqualung, these cohesive pieces seem to tell a story while having a quality that lets them standalone. Like Fear of a Blank Planet, it'll make the hair on your neck stand to attention while encouraging your noggin to bob in tandem with riveting beats.

You wouldn't know it from listening to these worldly cuts but the band spends most of its time playing on North America's Eastern coast.

To that end, each song exhibits a range of elements that would be statistically out of character. "The Prayer", for example, borders on Pain of Salvation if you were to remove the violins and flutes. These sophisticated instruments make it extremely folksy in that Scandinavian sense. Alternatively, "Nocturne" is a roundabout take on Genesis if it were to intersect with Yes.

On the whole, the album has a high concentration of progressive pectin. From the peel to its core, enriching fibers contained within this fallen fruit make it hard to resist. And inline with that legendary aphorism involving Adam & Eve, ingesting this material will evolve countless listeners from troglodytes into human beings.

 Echoes of Edensong by EDENSONG album cover Boxset/Compilation, 2010
3.58 | 13 ratings

BUY
Echoes of Edensong
Edensong Eclectic Prog

Review by Windhawk
Special Collaborator Honorary Collaborator

3 stars The US outfit EDENSONG started out as a band back in 2002, but by 2006 it had become the creative vehicle for musician and composer James Byron Schoen. Following the release of Edensong's debut effort "The Fruit Fallen", the band was back in action, however, and while crafting a new album's worth of material, they decided to provide their fans with a tidbit in 2010. Cue "Echoes of Edensong", sporting 15 minutes of new material, an official release for the hidden bonus track on their first CD and three live recordings, clocking it at just under an hour in length.

While I can't really see this hybrid album recruiting many new fans for Edensong, their existing fans will most likely find this production to be a nice acquisition while waiting for a sophomore effort. The live takes of their previous material are arguably the main points of interest, but ardent fans might want to get this due to the previously unreleased material anyhow.

 Echoes of Edensong by EDENSONG album cover Boxset/Compilation, 2010
3.58 | 13 ratings

BUY
Echoes of Edensong
Edensong Eclectic Prog

Review by progleggs

5 stars I have waited to weigh in on this one for over a month because of the nature of this album. Billed as an EP, but with 60 minutes of music. "New" material that is NOT really new. Half studio, half live. What is it exactly?

It is what it is stated to be. An album built around a favorite old composition of the band from an earlier incarnation, designed to keep Edensong fans interested until an album of all new material appears, hopefully in the near future. Given this stated objective, the album is an overwhelming success. The album begins with the above-referenced song, "Beneath The Tide." This has been a staple of the live Edensong shows for years, but apparently no satisfactory recording of it had been made. Accordingly, this unfinished business was attended to. This song alone, is worth the price of the album. It seems to have everything one could want in a song, be it prog or not. Like the songs from "The Fruit Fallen," this one has intelligent lyrics and great composition. However, it has that special something that is not easily definable. It can get your toes tapping, your head bobbing and cause your flesh to be covered in goosebumps. It is, for lack of a better word, "exciting." Just when you think, it can't get any better, the 5th track is the live version of the same song from their first big show at the 3RP festival in Pittsburgh in August, 2009. As someone who was lucky enough to be there I love the way that this version ramps up the intensity, adds a little virtuosity, and lets James Byron Schoen do what he does best; serve up incredibly impassioned live vocals. I can still visualize the flautist, Barry Seroff, completely unable to keep his body from spastic gyrations as he let go with a flute solo that seemed perfectly suited for the piece and kept the incessantly cresciendoing final chapter soaring to its conclusion. The biggest dilemna becomes choosing whether the studio or live version is better. My advice; feast on both.

The second song "Lorelai" is a ballad which provides a great counterpoint to "Beneath The Tide." Melodic, ethereal, and haunting it stands on its own, as well as providing a bridge to the third song "To See But Not Believe." To me, the inclusion of this track was, initially, a puzzling choice because it also appeared on "The Fruit Fallen", as a hidden track. However, due to the fact that it was so well hidden on the first album that some listeners may not have even found it, the choice makes more sense. In any event, the song works perfectly here. It is a high energy piece which also displays the characteristic Edensong mood shifts. It also is a great transition from "Lorelai."

Next comes the live performances. First, a terrific version of the classic "Reunion," from Progday, also performed last year. This song meanders through the familiar territory of its studio counterpart, but with increased energy and the everpresent passionate live vocals. This recording demonstrates the ability of the band to deliver the goods in a live setting. After the live rendition of "Beneath The Tide," there is a short (hidden?) metal type intro that begs to be finished, but unfortunately is not. This leads into the album's finale, the powerful "Sixth Day." Although this live recording from the Terra Incognito festival in Quebec, is a little lacking in the engineering, the excitement of this song comes through loud and clear! This album is every bit, the incredible and unique sonic experience of "The Fruit Fallen," which I found to be a masterpiece. Accordingly, I must also give this one 5 stars. However, if the abovementioned quirks bother you, I can understand taking off 1/2 to a full star. They obviously don't bother me.

 Echoes of Edensong by EDENSONG album cover Boxset/Compilation, 2010
3.58 | 13 ratings

BUY
Echoes of Edensong
Edensong Eclectic Prog

Review by Angelo
Special Collaborator Honorary Collaborator / Retired Admin

3 stars Two years after their well received debut, which was largely a recording effort by James Byron Schoen with help of some guest musicians, Edensong is a full blown band again. Again, because they were a band under the name Echoes of Eden in the late '90s. That band was a trio, consisting of Schoen, Anthony Waldman and Benjamin Wigler. After a reunion on stage during 3RP in 2009, Waldman became the permanent drummer for Edensong, and an old Echoes of Eden track, Beneath the Tide was re-arranged and re-recorded by Edensong. The track is indeed a nice piece of progressive metal, in the vein of some of the tracks of The Fruit Fallen but with more metal influences, consisting of interleaving metal riff driven parts and more melodic (acoustic?) guitar parts. Toward the end, the metal riffs disappear for a while, in favour of a melodic piece that is carried by guitar and keyboards akin in sound to older Genesis material, with Barry Seroff's flute appearing as a nice contrast to the closing riff. The second track, Lorelai is a ballad, played on acoustic guitar and sung nicely. It might have fit better on a full concept album, now it gets a bit lost amongst the heavier tracks. It's a song with a good cause though, it was written to support the fundraising and support for victims of the Haitian earthquake in January 2010. After Lorelai, it's back to the more metal akin side of Edensong, with the complex, multi layered To See but not Believe. The potential of guitar, keyboard, vocals and the availability of flute is put to good use here. Here I have to mention that Mike Lunapiena is the cello player for Edensong, but it takes a while to spot his sound when listening to the album the first couple of times. After the three new tracks, we find well played live renditions of Beneath the Tide and the tracks Reunion and The Sixth Day from the band's debut. These three allow those who haven't seen the band live to enjoy the sounds of different line ups and additional guest musicians. It's good to know that the band can deliver on the promise of the debut album in a live show, and as with The Fruit Fallen, I keep waiting for the day the band does make the trip across the Atlantic. If not, I can only hope my vacation in Canada goes through next year and Edensong plays close to where I am then. As far as judgement of this album goes, it's nice to know the band is still there, and that new things are underway, but overall I think The Fruit Fallen will get more playing time than this one.
 Echoes of Edensong by EDENSONG album cover Boxset/Compilation, 2010
3.58 | 13 ratings

BUY
Echoes of Edensong
Edensong Eclectic Prog

Review by horticulture52

5 stars OH-MY-GOD. This band has once again knocked my socks off. The first track, BENEATH THE TIDE is a masterpiece . I haven't heard a song this dense since THICK AS A BRICK or something from YES from the 70's. The layering, harmonies, and melodies will blow you away. A double bonus is that you get the live version of this track from the 3RP concert. Lorelai, the 2nd track, was written for the Haiti Projekt benefit and left me with chills the first time hearing it. The percussion and background vocals are breathtaking and haunting. Granted, half the album contains THE FRUIT FALLEN tracks, but they are never before released live tracks that sound as good or even better than their studio counterparts. Furthermore, TO SEE BUT NOT BELIEVE was a bonus track on the previous album, and now we have it as its own track! I can't emphasize how good this band is. It's really nice that they released something for their fans, because we've been dying since the release of THE FRUIT FALLEn. This compilation is a tasty appetizer and leaves us panting for more. I can't imagine how good the next album will be. i hope this band doesn't fall through like so many other bands in the industry. Disaster strikes so often when bands lose touch with their ingenuity and inspiration. This band is so good that I'll keep my faith in them. Don't let me down EDENSONG!!!!!!
 The Fruit Fallen by EDENSONG album cover Studio Album, 2008
3.38 | 40 ratings

BUY
The Fruit Fallen
Edensong Eclectic Prog

Review by Menswear
Prog Reviewer

3 stars The apple doesn't fall far from the tree.

I really wished that Edensong would bring me a new perspective, a breath of fresh oxygen, but once again, the fruit is not falling far from the traditional new-school-of-prog.

Okay, a nice concept based on religious matter with okay lyrics, but it's just that the music never got my total attention. Here and there, crunchy guitars and violin, but I really wanted something more organic, with vintage keys and more flute. Seems to me that this concept could've used more digging, more intensity. This type of subject is well carved for mellotron and symphonic grandeur, too bad is sounds a bit skinny for me.

I felt this band is more on the verge of neo-prog like Believe, Unitopia or Knight Area; you know, a lot to say but we hoped for different stuff.

Not super-convincing but professional and applied.

Thanks to Angelo for the artist addition. and to torrod for the last updates

Copyright Prog Archives, All rights reserved. | Legal Notice | Privacy Policy | Advertise | RSS + syndications

Other sites in the MAC network: JazzMusicArchives.com — jazz music reviews and archives | MetalMusicArchives.com — metal music reviews and archives