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Aphrodite's Child - End Of The World CD (album) cover

END OF THE WORLD

Aphrodite's Child

 

Symphonic Prog

3.43 | 58 ratings

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Easy Livin
Special Collaborator
Honorary Collaborator / Retired Admin
3 stars Big (men) in Paris

Famously known for bringing together keyboards maestro Vangelis and easy listening singer Demis Roussos, Aphrodite's Child were formed in Greece in 1968. The band was completed by Loukas Sideras on drums and Anargyros "Silver" Koulouris on guitar, with Roussos also playing bass. Intending to relocate to London, UK, the band got as far as Paris, France, where various factors combined to impede their progress. Rather than sit on their hands waiting, they signed a record contract in Paris, and released the single "Rain and tears" a few months later. The single found chart success in a number of European countries, so an album was quickly put together to capitalise on the success.

All the songs on "End of the world" were written by Vangelis (Papathanassiou) with non- band member Boris Bergman. Classical composer Johann Pachelbel also receives a credit for the use of his "Canon" melody on "Rain and tears". The album has in recent years become a sought after rarity, although it has now finally been released on CD and download.

This is very much a proto-prog album, full of sounds which are now of their time but which in 1968 were novel and exciting. It may seem hard to believe, but Demous Rousos singing is actually invigorated and inventive. The fact that he was and is a fine singer must have been a major factor in the success of the the band. Vangelis keyboard work is confined to more traditional instruments such as piano and organ, his dalliances with synthesiser still being a few years off.

At times, such as on "The grass is not green", we venture into more spacy, psychedelic territories, but generally the songs are well arranged pop based affairs. "You always Stand in My Way" features some unusually aggressive mellotron sounds, that instrument being more associated with pastoral orchestral effects.

One thing which noticeable is the lack of any significant lead guitar work, perhaps reflecting Anargyros Koulouris partial absence from the recordings (he was called up for military service around that time).

In all, an album which, to those hearing in the 2000's for the first time, will sound rather naïve and dated. We must however recognise the vast amount of music which this album pre-dates. Seen for what it is and when it was recorded, this is a highly inventive and satisfying début.

Recent releases include both sides of the band's first single"Plastics Nevermore/The other people" as bonus tracks. Both are interesting is an historical context, but not really worth seeking out.

Easy Livin | 3/5 |

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