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Jethro Tull - Living In The Past  CD (album) cover

LIVING IN THE PAST

Jethro Tull

 

Prog Folk

4.11 | 234 ratings

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Atkingani
Special Collaborator
Honorary Collaborator / Retired Admin
4 stars This double output was released in Brazil, in 1974, after the releasing of two great JT's epics ("Thick As A Brick" and "A Passion Play") and this chronology, different from other countries, resulted very interesting, maybe adequate - a relaxing bonanza time following the stormy and grandiose previous movements. Also "Living In The Past" listed a bunch of songs that weren't previously known by tupinikin* fans and so the Tull's aficionados treated this album as a recollection rather than a mere compilation. Good, but being double it doubled the price too and for teenager students the only way to get it was to make a consortium where every moment had to be enjoyed heavenly.

Being an album that contains works from different periods it's nice to observe that all principal band members form the line-up, all captained by the omnipresent Ian Anderson and all showing great skilful in a way that the listener is always feeling like gifted. "Living In The Past" could be more enjoyable if some weak tracks were replaced by others much more meaningful, although it's clear that this release was produced with the intention of not being a 'greatest hits' stuff. We didn't know at the time but this double album included mainly single releases (certainly in the UK).

'Song for Jeffrey', the opening track, is a typical JT's folky tune, proto-prog par excellence and also a great opener; flute playing is a registered mark. 'Love story' and 'Christmas song' do a good preparation for the title-track, a very catchy and pleasant one that got the dubious distinction of being a fairly radio broadcasted song, a real top-chart hit. 'Bouree', an adaptation of a Bach's theme is one of the highlights of the album - the jazzy mood is awesome and funny. 'Sweet dream' bears that mesmerizing Tull rhythm, splendid, probably the best song of this recollection.

Also great moments are: 'Teacher', a soft blues-rock, very agreeable; 'Alive and well and living in', with a great piano intro followed by a rarely heard smooth Anderson's voice; middle section of the song shows some interesting post-bossa-nova touches; 'Wond'ring again', a kind of ballad in accordance with JT's lexicon, also catchy and tasteful; 'Hymn 43', another highlight of the album; there's a perceptible pride in the way they play - yes, they're really proud of being progressive; 'Life's a long song', closes greatly the set of great tracks with a good smell of Donovan's stuff. Other songs are hearable but not necessarily unforgettable.

That's it: a great work, not a masterpiece but essential for any music collection. Total: 4.

*tupinikin, a nickname for Brazilian - pronounce toopeeneekeen.

Atkingani | 4/5 |

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