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JETHRO TULL

Prog Folk • United Kingdom


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Jethro Tull biography
Founded in Blackpool, UK in 1967 - Hiatus from 2012-2016


"I didn`t have to play it all the time, I just had to wave it around and look good" - Ian Anderson 2003.

Eccentric on stage yet rather thoughtful, reserved and even sombre at times when not in the limelight, the Jethro Tull image was the brainchild of flute wielding frontman Ian ANDERSON. Clad in scruffy vagabond apparel, and looking more like an anachronism out of a Charles Dickens tale, Anderson conveyed an old English aura during the band`s formative years in the late 60`s and early 70`s which would persist throughout the band's 40 year career both visually and musically.

Born on August 10, 1947 in Dunfermline, Fife, Scotland, Anderson was augmented by a revolving door of colourful musicians over the years which added to the flamboyance of the Jethro Tull phenomenon. Conceived as a psychedelic blues band in late 1967 the music of Jethro Tull has always been dauntingly intricate embracing many styles including blues, jazz, folk, medieval, classical, hard rock along with forays into electronic music, sometimes referred to as "space age prog". The lyrics were equally as sophisticated and sometimes reached new heights of grandiloquence commenting on depressing world events such as drug abuse, the oil crisis, modernisation, third world troubles and a deteriorating economy.. Other topics included fads, spy novels, environmental and social issues as well as metaphysical musings. With lyrics and music which ran deep Jethro Tull have often been over-analysed by both fans and critics alike and many of their albums have been erroneously interpreted as autobiographical due to the fact that many of their record covers featured artwork which seemed to depict Ian Anderson's likeness, something which he has vehemently denied in numerous interviews.

Jethro Tull can trace their origins back to 1963 when as a young art student in Blackpool, England Anderson formed a band called THE BLADES (after a club in a James Bond novel). By 1965 as a 7-piece they had changed their name to THE JOHN EVAN BAND and subsequently to THE JOHN EVAN SMASH (his mother supplied their tour van) Evan, whose real name was Evans, would eventually become the band's keyboard player for most of the seventies. The band relocated to London in`67, the centre of the British blues movement of the sixties in search of more lucrative gigs. However the band was gradually d...
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JETHRO TULL discography


Ordered by release date | Showing ratings (top albums) | Help Progarchives.com to complete the discography and add albums

JETHRO TULL top albums (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

3.31 | 883 ratings
This Was
1968
4.04 | 1319 ratings
Stand Up
1969
3.90 | 1106 ratings
Benefit
1970
4.36 | 2750 ratings
Aqualung
1971
4.63 | 3467 ratings
Thick as a Brick
1972
4.04 | 1533 ratings
A Passion Play
1973
3.34 | 877 ratings
War Child
1974
4.03 | 1283 ratings
Minstrel in the Gallery
1975
3.09 | 808 ratings
Too Old To Rock 'n' Roll: Too Young To Die!
1976
4.20 | 1498 ratings
Songs from the Wood
1977
4.04 | 1232 ratings
Heavy Horses
1978
3.48 | 785 ratings
Stormwatch
1979
3.23 | 650 ratings
A
1980
3.29 | 684 ratings
The Broadsword And The Beast
1982
2.25 | 542 ratings
Under Wraps
1984
3.02 | 167 ratings
A Classic Case
1985
3.22 | 601 ratings
Crest of a Knave
1987
2.69 | 473 ratings
Rock Island
1989
2.61 | 445 ratings
Catfish Rising
1991
3.60 | 533 ratings
Roots To Branches
1995
3.01 | 444 ratings
J-Tull Dot Com
1999
3.49 | 417 ratings
The Jethro Tull Christmas Album
2003

JETHRO TULL Live Albums (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

4.19 | 428 ratings
Live - Bursting Out
1978
2.90 | 53 ratings
Live At Hammersmith '84
1990
3.66 | 179 ratings
A Little Light Music
1992
3.08 | 50 ratings
In Concert
1995
3.66 | 124 ratings
Living With The Past
2002
4.18 | 167 ratings
Nothing Is Easy: Live At The Isle Of Wight 1970
2004
3.46 | 100 ratings
Aqualung Live
2005
3.76 | 90 ratings
Live At Montreux 2003
2007
4.32 | 10 ratings
Live at Madison Square Garden 1978
2009
4.41 | 27 ratings
Live At Carnegie Hall 1970
2015

JETHRO TULL Videos (DVD, Blu-ray, VHS etc)

3.85 | 53 ratings
Slipstream (DVD)
1981
3.81 | 43 ratings
20 Years of Jethro Tull (VHS)
1988
3.47 | 84 ratings
Living With the Past
2002
3.04 | 51 ratings
A New Day Yesterday - The 25th Anniversary Collection
2003
3.87 | 93 ratings
Nothing Is Easy: Live At The Isle Of Wight 1970
2005
2.97 | 68 ratings
Live At Montreux 2003
2007
4.05 | 22 ratings
Slipstream (9 song version)
2007
4.39 | 28 ratings
Classic Artists Series: Jethro Tull
2008
3.33 | 32 ratings
Jack In The Green - Live In Germany
2008
3.64 | 23 ratings
Songs From Bethlehem
2008
4.36 | 104 ratings
Live At Madison Square Garden 1978 (DVD + CD)
2009
3.79 | 34 ratings
Live at AVO Session Basel 2008
2009
4.54 | 35 ratings
Around the World Live (4DVD)
2013

JETHRO TULL Boxset & Compilations (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

3.10 | 2 ratings
Jethro Tull
1970
3.00 | 1 ratings
Sunday Best
1971
4.12 | 327 ratings
Living In The Past
1972
3.02 | 83 ratings
M.U. - The Best of Jethro Tull
1976
2.95 | 55 ratings
Repeat - The Best Of Jethro Tull - Vol. II
1977
1.95 | 2 ratings
The Best Of Jethro Tull Vol. III
1981
3.17 | 79 ratings
Original Masters
1985
2.00 | 1 ratings
Masters of Rock
1986
3.64 | 84 ratings
20 Years Of Jethro Tull Box
1988
4.49 | 86 ratings
20 Years Of Jethro Tull (The Definitive Collection)
1988
3.73 | 53 ratings
20 Years Of Jethro Tull (USA release)
1989
3.64 | 162 ratings
Nightcap
1993
3.81 | 52 ratings
The Best Of Jethro Tull: The Anniversary Collection
1993
4.43 | 80 ratings
25th Anniversary Box Set
1993
2.64 | 27 ratings
A Jethro Tull Collection
1997
1.54 | 31 ratings
Through The Years
1997
3.01 | 72 ratings
The Very Best Of Jethro Tull
2001
2.26 | 15 ratings
Essential Jethro Tull
2007
3.44 | 53 ratings
The Best Of Acoustic Jethro Tull
2007
3.80 | 47 ratings
The Jethro Tull Christmas Album / Live - Christmas At St Bride's 2008
2009
4.71 | 52 ratings
Aqualung - 40th Anniversary Collector's Edition
2011
2.10 | 2 ratings
Essential
2011
4.87 | 83 ratings
Thick as a Brick - 40th Anniversary Special Edition
2012
4.88 | 75 ratings
A Passion Play: An Extended Perfomance
2014
4.73 | 47 ratings
War Child - The 40th Anniversary Theatre Edition
2014
4.64 | 52 ratings
Minstrel In The Gallery - 40th Anniversary: La Grande Edition
2015
4.69 | 27 ratings
Too Old To Rock'n'Roll: Too Young To Die - The TV Special Edition
2015
5.00 | 18 ratings
Stand Up - The Elevated Edition
2016
4.96 | 17 ratings
Aqualung - 40th Anniversary Adapted Edition
2016
2.00 | 1 ratings
An Introduction to Jethro Tull
2017
4.95 | 39 ratings
Songs From The Wood - 40th Anniversary Edition - The Country Set
2017
4.58 | 27 ratings
Heavy Horses (New Shoes Edition)
2018
4.65 | 17 ratings
This Was (50 Anniversary Edition)
2018
3.00 | 5 ratings
50 for 50
2018
2.00 | 3 ratings
50th Anniversary Collection
2018
4.51 | 23 ratings
Stormwatch (The 40th Anniversary Force 10 Edition)
2019
4.30 | 18 ratings
A (La Mode) - The 40th Anniversary Edition
2021

JETHRO TULL Official Singles, EPs, Fan Club & Promo (CD, EP/LP, MC, Digital Media Download)

3.88 | 17 ratings
Love Story
1968
4.13 | 24 ratings
A Song For Jeffrey
1968
2.71 | 18 ratings
Sunshine Day
1968
4.14 | 28 ratings
Sweet Dream / 17
1969
4.14 | 21 ratings
The Witch's Promise
1969
4.53 | 31 ratings
Living In The Past
1969
3.88 | 17 ratings
Inside
1970
4.53 | 38 ratings
Life Is A Long Song
1971
4.21 | 19 ratings
Hymn 43
1971
4.39 | 27 ratings
Aqualung
1971
3.80 | 5 ratings
Locomotive Breath
1971
4.17 | 30 ratings
Living In The Past
1972
3.56 | 25 ratings
Bungle In The Jungle
1974
4.40 | 5 ratings
Skating Away on the Thin Ice of the New Day
1974
3.67 | 3 ratings
Minstrel in the Gallery / Summerday Sands
1975
3.21 | 29 ratings
Ring Out, Solstice Bells
1976
3.33 | 6 ratings
Too Old To Rock 'N' Roll; Too Young To Die
1976
3.67 | 27 ratings
The Whistler
1977
3.50 | 8 ratings
A Stitch In Time
1978
4.07 | 27 ratings
Moths
1978
3.88 | 8 ratings
Warm Sporran
1979
2.68 | 19 ratings
North Sea Oil
1979
4.53 | 19 ratings
Home E.P.
1979
3.22 | 22 ratings
Working John, Working Joe
1980
3.32 | 22 ratings
Fallen On Hard Times
1982
3.48 | 21 ratings
Broadsword
1982
3.05 | 21 ratings
Lap Of Luxury
1984
3.67 | 3 ratings
Bourrée
1985
3.93 | 14 ratings
Coronach
1986
3.79 | 14 ratings
Said She Was A Dancer 12''
1987
3.63 | 16 ratings
Steel Monkey 12''
1987
4.00 | 4 ratings
Part Of The Machine
1988
3.74 | 18 ratings
Another Christmas Song
1989
3.58 | 17 ratings
This Is Not Love
1991
3.84 | 16 ratings
Rocks On The Road
1991
3.00 | 14 ratings
Living in the (Slightly More Recent) Past / Living in the Past
1993
2.71 | 19 ratings
Rare And Precious Chain
1995
3.29 | 17 ratings
Bends Like A Willow
1999
3.20 | 10 ratings
The Christmas EP
2004
4.00 | 3 ratings
Living in the Past
2013

JETHRO TULL Reviews


Showing last 10 reviews only
 A (La Mode) - The 40th Anniversary Edition by JETHRO TULL album cover Boxset/Compilation, 2021
4.30 | 18 ratings

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A (La Mode) - The 40th Anniversary Edition
Jethro Tull Prog Folk

Review by TenYearsAfter

4 stars In the comprehensive and captivating liner notes we can read that initially the A album was meant as a solo project by Ian Anderson (that explains the A), but in the end the record company decided that releasing A as a new Jethro Tull album was commercially more interesting. And that "A was an attempt to bring Jethro Tull from the farmland into the Eighties".

Well, to me the studio-album A sounds fresh and inspired, with strong contributions by special guest Eddie Jobson. But it is not really a historical musical document, some great tracks, and some mediocre songs. However the A tour was glorious, a stunning blend of Jethro Tull classics, and the visual extra bonus of Eddie Jobson performing the A tracks, with mindblowing soli on his violins, and spectacular use of the mighty Yamaha CS-80 synthesizer, in those days high- tec. I was blown away by Jethro Tull on stage during the A tour, but pretty disappointed about the Slipstream video footage, I consider the band clips as disturbing. So I hoped that this lavish boxset featured unreleased live video footage, as you can see on YouTube, unfortunately this is not the case.

Nonethless this boxset is very interesting, especially due to the excellent two different remixes (by Steve Wilson, CD-1 and DVD-1) and bonustracks of the A album, the entire LA 1980 concert (2 different mixes, on CD 2 and 3, and DVD 2, audio only), and last but not least the remixed Slipstream video (DVD-3).

For me this 3-CD/3-DVD boxset is a very pleasant trip down Memory Lane, back to a concert that featured two great and unique musicians: Eddie Jobson and Ian Anderson (they met each other when UK supported Jethro Tull in 1979), enjoy their sparkling chemistry, embellished with lots of sensational soli on guitar, flute and keyboards.

 Thick as a Brick by JETHRO TULL album cover Studio Album, 1972
4.63 | 3467 ratings

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Thick as a Brick
Jethro Tull Prog Folk

Review by Ian McGregor

5 stars As bold as it may sound, but out of the top five albums in this site, there's only two that I consider beginning-to-end masterpieces with no filler or weak tracks. The first one is, obviously, Close To The Edge, but the second one is without a doubt Jethro Tull's fifth album, Thick As A Brick.

An album that consists entirely of a single title track divided in half, with multiple movements. I don't think any other record I've ever heard is as compact as this one. It's a non-stop rollercoaster of tons and tons of different sections getting thrown at your face before you can even process them. It's a very technical album, yet it somehow doesn't feel pretentious or self-indulgent.

Funnily enough, this record is a joke. Music critics, as always, are never satisfied. When Jethro Tull released Aqualung, the critics said it was good but directionless. In other words, they wanted a concept album. Something easy to follow. Jethro Tull, in response, made a concept album that's basically an epic poem by a ten year old. The intentional messiness of the story complements perfectly with the manic and fast paced instrumentation that remains for the whole record.

Strangely, this is one of the most accessible Jethro Tull albums, don't get tricked by the fact that it's composed of two twenty minute tracks. The melodies are catchy, memorable, and easy to sing along to. There really isn't any Moonchild-ish sections that could come up as too experimental and scare away potential new prog fans. The album has an excellent flow and it's not boring a single moment. It combines up-beat instrumentation with mellow parts that are more present in the second half of the album.

This is one of those records that is perfect from beginning to end. There's nothing that you can change about it. Every second is there for a solid reason and the ending product is very satisfying to listen. An essential album of progressive rock, and one of the cornerstones of rock in general.

 Thick as a Brick by JETHRO TULL album cover Studio Album, 1972
4.63 | 3467 ratings

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Thick as a Brick
Jethro Tull Prog Folk

Review by Antonio Giacomin

5 stars Thick As A Brick

There should be allowed to every fond prog reviewer in this site the chosen of SEVEN masterpieces to receive a sixth star. And I say SEVEN just because there are seven days in a week and seven wonders in the world, as well?

Of course, "Thick As A Brick" would be one of those seven masterpiece to receive a sixth star. For those that might be curious I say the other ones are "Close To The Edge", "Selling England By The Pound", "Foxtrot", "Pawn Hearts", "Godbluff" and "In A Glass House". Of course, my apologies to "In The Court Of Crimson King", you would be the eighth; but unfortunately we are allowed to choose only seven (I cannot stop joking ever?)?

Ok, I like to make fun many of the times, but I can I say about "Thick As A Brick" that wasn´t said yet ? Frankly, not too much. Master of concept album ? Of course it is. The story told in this concept is so strong and above average and matches criterion of genius ? Of course ! The only new thing I can present is my position of an old prog lover; "Thick As A Brick" is for me the ONLY album that really gets near "Close To The Edge" as the best prog album that has ever been recorded? SIX STARS?

 Thick as a Brick by JETHRO TULL album cover Studio Album, 1972
4.63 | 3467 ratings

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Thick as a Brick
Jethro Tull Prog Folk

Review by ElChanclas

5 stars "...really don't mind if you sit this one out, my word's but a whisper your deafness a shout..." and I was hooked for life 25 years or so ago, my first prog music listen ever, my first progressive music purchase ever and still up to this date my go-to Tull album. The genius of this masterpiece won't ever fit in any review because there is too much greatness in it, Anderson's musical and lyrical creativity where at an irrepetible place and left an eternal mark in rock's history, mainly within the symphonic and progressive music community. Medieval flutes and acoustic guitars open this concept album in a memorable way bringing love at first sight for any listener, no doubt about that, and then the band steps in...

Hammond and Barlow's tandem works like a Swiss clock flawlessly executing a very complex variety of tempos and beats following the lead of a madman to the dot while, in the meantime, Evan and Barre playfully fill the atmosphere with unearthly riffs and melodies while Palmers's orchestral performance brings balance to the whole crazy and genius act! The madman is no more and the now mad scientist smiles lifting his flute to the sky conquering the music world forever "...and the poet sheaths his pen while the soldier lifts his sword..." If you know this album then go and revisit it, if you don't then...treat yourself to an unforgettable musical experience.

 Benefit by JETHRO TULL album cover Studio Album, 1970
3.90 | 1106 ratings

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Benefit
Jethro Tull Prog Folk

Review by A Crimson Mellotron

4 stars A secret gem, remaining somewhat absent from some discussions, but a record that deserves rock and prog fanatics' full attention - this is Jethro Tull's third studio release, named 'Benefit' and released in mid-1970, after two really good albums, also continuing the band's streak of releasing something every year. Now, 'Benefit' comes after the pretty decent debut, and the quite solid but still not fully epic 'Stand Up', and it plays its role as a seriously important step in the band's development, but it has to be said that by itself this album is pretty damn excellent! I would even go on to say that there is no 'Aqualung' without 'Benefit' - the five-piece display a tremendous songwriting, more riff-oriented compositions, with sharp and sometimes corky wordsmith by Ian Anderson, all making up for a very well-structured and enjoyable album.

The mixture of their bluesy roots, with the hard rock leanings, is probably the main flavor of the album; the folky bits are also here, of course, as well as the medieval-like phrasing; So, one has all the elements that make up what is for many the essential Jethro Tull sound. This 1970 release is a very straight-to-the-point solid collection of songs, maybe a bit darker than its predecessors, but very elegant and impressive. The guitar playing is the thing that would probably remain in the memory of the listener after a few spins; Martin Barre is exploring more large-sound, heavier riffage, which results in some pretty iconic songs, in my humble opinion. The keyboards are still not very prominent, as 'Benefit' could be more fruitfully classified as a hard rock album, rather than a prog one. Glenn Cornick does some justice on the bass, and Clive Bunker impresses with his fine drumming. Anderson, as usual, is the multi-instrumentalist powerhouse leading Tull to its glorious moments - the man wrote the whole album, except for his vocal, lyrical, and musical contributions.

Several highlights can be found here (or rather, no bad songs are present!), among which one should point out the opening track 'With You There to Help Me', an exploration on friendship, and probably on the power and possibilities of human relationships; 'Alive and Well and Living In' is a shorter and very elegant poetic piece that leads to the crushingly good 'Son', with its almost obnoxious main riff; Then one would hardly miss out on praising 'To Cry You a Song' ? the first really epic J Tull song? Or the melancholic adventure of 'Inside', and the admiration that 'Sossity; You're a Woman' instills, a brilliant way to finish off an excellent album.

Jethro Tull certainly reached new heights with 'Benefit', despite some not so laudable commentaries from critics and fans. It is an album that has a personality, it is a coherent and enjoyable listen, and despite being somewhat of a transitory release for the band, it is a very well-written one, containing some of the most killer songs one will find in any early 70s rock album.

 Aqualung by JETHRO TULL album cover Studio Album, 1971
4.36 | 2750 ratings

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Aqualung
Jethro Tull Prog Folk

Review by prog_traveller!!

4 stars The greatest architect of this band was and certainly is Anderson with his genius, his immense creativity and, let's face it, sometimes his madness. The brightest high in the long history of this group is probably the 1971 album, "Aqualung", an excellent example of that music Tull have accustomed us to over the years: a Progressive Rock with vigorous Hard hints mixed with a strong folk vein also dictated by a massive but never banal use of the mythical flute that has embroidered and seasoned with particular imagination the various tracks of this and other albums of theirs. Even before listening to music, one is immediately struck by the very original title and cover, very hermetic in meaning. "Aqualung" is the name of a bum (invented by Anderson's mind) who is then depicted, in fact, on the cover and indicates one of the main themes addressed within the album, namely the living conditions of the poor layers. Another theme of great importance, touched upon above all in the second part of the disc, will then be an articulated reflection, through a sharp and poisonous irony, on the church and religion.

The music is a mixture of hard rock, blues, Celtic folk, and "openings" typical of the 70's prog, less immediate than those of Genesis, to make a name that everyone knows, and with a very personal use of rhythm. It opens with the title track, and the compositional vein of the band is already clear. Many changes and text that speaks of the solitude of Aqualung (respirator, from the sound of the labored breathing of homeless people); then Cross-Eyed Mary, one of the most acclaimed live pieces, with the histrionic Anderson always on the shields with his flute to weave the story of Mary who goes with the rich and gives to the poor. The next three pieces hold up great on acoustic guitar, flute and violins, and on Ian's nasal voice, as well as on an impressive rhythm. Up To Me seems to describe medieval atmospheres, but the text refers to the proletarian society of the time; still guitar and flute to be the masters.

Side B begins with My God. My God is in fact a masterpiece that contains everything that Jethro Tull could give, that is a complete and varied musical architecture (from HR to medieval music) and a complex and involving rhythmic texture more than what is imagined at first listen, to be dissected note by note. The next simple rock of Hymn 43 is appropriate, useful to breathe before the rarefied atmospheres of Slipstream. True Hard Rock for Locomitive Breath, a live anthem that allowed Anderson to vent all his class on stage between singing, flute and typical movements of his performances. Piano and text again against the instrumental use of religion - a recurring theme - for Wind Up, which worthily closes the platter.

In my opinion, Aqualung remains one of the highest points ever touched in Jethro Tull's never-too-praised career. An album like this is impossible to overcome!

 This Was by JETHRO TULL album cover Studio Album, 1968
3.31 | 883 ratings

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This Was
Jethro Tull Prog Folk

Review by mental_hygiene

3 stars This is the first album I'm listening to as part of a Jethro Tull studio album crawl. This Was is their 1968 debut, and as implied by the title, was a very particular moment in time. Right off the bat, hearing Ian Anderson do blues vocals is particularly jarring. It's not bad in any way, but permanently tainted by the fact that pretty much everyone who has listened to This Was has listened to another Tull album. That said, in terms of non-prog debuts of prog bands, this stands as a solid british blues rock album. The musicianship and arrangements are far from boring, and dare I say there are a lot of elements of later Tull that are quite evident on here. I've listened to the original mix, but am writing this review to the definitive Steven Wilson remix.

This Was starts off strong with My Sunday Feeling, a solid introduction to blues Tull. The production of this album is fairly cheap, even for the 60s, but thankfully the remix takes care of the mud in the mix. The flute soloing is nice and tight, and the drums are particularly dynamic for a blues record. It has a jazz flair in how the drums follow the rhythm of the melody. The electric soloing is great, nothing outstanding of the era but groovy and interesting. This is followed by the drumless Some Day the Sun Won't Shine for You. It's an interesting and effective choice that brings out the best of the guitar on this record. The vocals are intimate and well done, and the guitar sounds really good as it comps the blues form with small licks and riffs giving the song a soothing flair. I haven't heard many Ian Anderson harmonica solos, but for an instrument he isn't known for, he does a great job of creating dynamic and interesting lines.

One of the unexpected favorite picks I found on This Was is Beggar's Farm. I think it sonically is the closest to later tull that's on here. This almost sounds like it could've been an aqualung reject, not to shoot this song down but more to elevate the fact that this is actually pretty awesome. The tempo shifts are fairly prog for a blues song. The breakdown towards the end where the guitar gets all chromatic almost sounds like proto-king crimson if just for a moment. I would call this song solidly underrated!

Move On Alone introduces a horn part to the sound. The vocals seem to be delivered by Mick Abrahams instead of Ian Anderson. This sounds very untull, so I would assume that this is Abrahams' song because of how it's orchestrated and arranged. It's a bit of a pop nugget hidden on this record, but it's ultimately really irrelevant to their sound. Serenade to a Cuckoo follows, a Rashaan Roland Kirk cover and apparently one of the first songs Anderson learned on flute. It's another very smooth midtempo jazz blues song, but is at least unique for Anderson's budding virtuosity on flute as well as being a very respectful, interesting, and well executed cover song that doesn't end up being filler.

Dharma For One immediately introduces itself as a hard hitter, the drums being very loud and active and the guitar being caked in overdrive. This one is similar to later Tull yet again in how the arrangements flow and also in how the harmonies sound. It's really interesting to be able to clearly hear which songs were definitely Anderson-penned and which were influenced by Abrahams. The drum solo on this is almost manic at times, a far cry from most blues drum solos of the time. This is followed by the more standard It's Breaking Me Up. The vocals on this track are really well done on Anderson's part. I feel like this song doesn't really do much that's unique, but it's still some cool blues rock. I wouldn't say bad, but fairly complacent and standard. "oh no evil woman" songs come a dime a dozen in blues rock.

Being on of the few solid blues rock bangers on This Was, Cat's Squirrel is another surprising highlight on this record. The guitar solo over the drumroll is a particularly interesting choice that ties in more to later Tull. There's a lot of creative sparks like this hidden throughout the record that I think are really solidly underrated. The remix brings a ton of life into this song especially. A Song For Jeffrey is probably the most iconic song (and lead single) from This Was. The vocals are filtered and delivered with a really strong affect. More of Ian Anderson on harmonica, and now that I think of it, a more interesting blend of blues harmonies and the rock and jazz that would later distinguish the band.

I came into this record thinking it was probably going to be a meh album at best, but there are still plenty of highs and songs that I will in fact listen to in the future. This Was is a relic, and has been since Mick Abrahams left Jethro Tull. It's a proto-prog album with a few uninteresting songs (Move On Alone, It's Breaking Me Up), but a few very solid and underrated tracks within the Tull canon (My Sunday Feeling, A Song for Jeffrey, Cat's Squirrel, Dharma for One). I wouldn't call this essential, but there is definitely something in this for Tull fans as well as general proto-prog fans. One of the more daring and interesting blues rock albums I've heard from the 60s, and that's up against Cream, Traffic... the whole lot.

 Live - Bursting Out by JETHRO TULL album cover Live, 1978
4.19 | 428 ratings

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Live - Bursting Out
Jethro Tull Prog Folk

Review by prog_traveller!!

5 stars Damn, how difficult it was to classify this record. Here we are faced with the summa of the art of Anderson & co., Therefore a disc that includes all the genres that Tull have always "exploited" in creating their mix of styles. 'Bursting Out' is an anthology in the fullest sense of the term given that blues, rock, prog, folk and so on and so forth live there. After a 10-year career that had produced 11 highly decorated albums from a sales point of view and which had produced huge crowds of fans to the point that in the early 70's the band had surpassed the Rolling Stones on the Billboard referendums (the public's voice is always the most gratifying), Ian decides that it was time to finally go on the market with a decidedly "robust" and satisfying double live for the Tullian palates, especially all those who had never had the opportunity to "test them" live. The group had already made some extremely courageous choices in the previous two years, coming out with albums definitely in contrast with the fashions of the moment (in the middle of the punk era they churned out two excellent folk works: Songs from the wood and Heavy horses). Well, increasingly considered as dinosaurs by the know-it-all of critics, Bursting out will cause their gentlemen so much gall spilled over and over in specialized magazines all over the world.

The objective analysis instead speaks to us of one of the most beautiful live shows ever. Recorded in Switzerland, precisely in 1978, and introduced by a dynamic presentation of the tour promoter, the record immediately leaves us in the chair with an introduction of distorted guitar by the great Martin Barre, on which he intervenes immediately Ian with his fife and the immediate entry of the rest of the band spreads into a pretty cool rock. This is No Lullaby, a song contained in the aforementioned 'Heavy Horses'. Public immediately in delirium and purity of sound in evidence despite the technical means of the time certainly did not shine for effectiveness as those of today. We move on to Sweet Dreams, much heavier than the studio version where it was affected a little by the cloying arrangements of the orchestra. After the first two songs you have the chance to experience Ian's verve and his sense of humor in introducing the band members. Speaking of which, here's the fantastic line-up: Ian, of course, and then the immortal Martin Barre on electric guitar, the incredible Barriemore Barlow on drums (he had an impressive set), crazy (on stage) John Evans on keyboards, Johm Glascock on bass and embroiderer David Palmer on keyboards too.

Ian introduces us after Sweet Dreams to Skating away on the thin ice of the new day, from 'Minstrel in the gallery'. Here the 6 seem to have a lot of fun, in an almost joyful piece played with accordions and glockenspiel and Ian's acoustics are the masters. Here begins the trilogy of folk pieces of the disc that continues with Jack in the Green (from Songs from he wood), performed much better than in the studio, more airy and bright. After the umpteenth bizarre presentation of Anderson we are at One Brown Mouse, sweet and pulled to the maximum. Thus we arrive at the first heart skip as well as in the past. A New Day Yesterday (Stand Up). Well, let's get to our feet it really should be said .... the execution is spectacular with Barlow giving a spectacular coloring behind the heads and Barre's solo on the guitar distorted and clean at the same time. The song is retouched a lot from the original, but the thrills are the same. Sudden stop and detachment that preludes a flute solo that produces emotions in profusion. In the solo in question, Ian puts his entire repertoire as a mad flautist into it like puffs, screams and echo effect to multiply the crystalline notes that enchant. He also inserts an excerpt from a piece coming from the ancient English tradition (Rest ye merry gentlemen) performed with the rest of the group that he accompanies with a march that makes you think of the Hamelin flutist. Intermezzo and Ian who first makes us glimpse and then finally "see" the magical Bourr'e. Never heard an audience explosion like in this case. Endless emotions for the listener and a damned desire to go back in time to be able to perhaps be present at that event. We then move on to a short version of Songs from the Wood. The Scottish minstrel is already about to throw yet another low blow to the tender heart, with a voice halfway between a tempting devil and an old good-natured friend asks the audience: "Let's see if you remember this". The acoustic six-string hits nothing less than ..... Thick as a Brick. Sorry but I'm also getting excited to write about this thing. Here we have an obviously abbreviated version of the 72's masterpiece which includes the most significant moments of side A, excluding the last stupendous edit. By now the delirium in the hall is total, the performance exudes feeling and absolute instrumental technique. Martin and Barriemore especially show greatness. The Fantastic 6 have everyone in their hands and they know it and they give it all up with conviction. We come to one of the best things about 'Songs from the Wood'. The wild and surreal Hunting girl. Very fast keyboard start with almost cathedral tone and overbearing entry of the rest of the band in a piece that requires a lot of technique to perform. Very beautifull.. Then comes Too Old to rock and roll .... Too Young to Die! Honestly, this song has never excited me that much, but anyway ... it is also one of the best known pieces of Tull. Conundrum is a very special moment that almost seems to have been put there to show that even without Ian they are masters (well ... well ...). However it is a moment of pure class. Rock donated with both hands with intertwining guitar-bass-drums that have the supernatural and then .... then the most beautiful and complicated solo that my ears have ever heard on drums. Something incredible that shows how there are men who perhaps as a result of genetic experiments possess not 4 but maybe 5 or 6 limbs. Spectacular.

The next moment is thrilling again with the introduction based on acoustics and organ that reveal the magical Minstrel in the Gallery, played very heavily with poor Glascock's bass in great evidence (John died shortly after for an absurd cardiac complication following tooth infection !!!!!). Ian's voice is at the top and the excitement is at its peak again. We arrive at the last section which, except for some intervals, is taken from 'Aqualung'. Is there a better way to celebrate 10 years of activity in honor of pure art? Cross-eyed-Mary, Locomotive Breath, and Aqualung itself are performed with almost self-congratulatory power. We arrive at the final moment with a traditional English march (The Dambusters march), which Ian uses in concerts to throw huge balloons at the audience (which he will do until 1981. From 82 onwards he will continue to throw balls to the notes of Cheerio) .

 Stormwatch by JETHRO TULL album cover Studio Album, 1979
3.48 | 785 ratings

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Stormwatch
Jethro Tull Prog Folk

Review by Beautiful Scarlet

3 stars Solid album, 3/5

A good mix of music, I find the second side weaker then the first, if the second side kept up the first sides quality then I'd give this 4/5.

North Sea Oil is a short song, poppish rock song that's rather catchy. Features a spoken word part during the bridge, neat.

Orion is a nice song with the same vibe as the previous track, although to my ears it is better, this is my favourite of the short songs on Stormwatch.

Home is an okay ballad.

Dark ages is the long song of the first side. Great song, opens with bombastic guitar and features powerful vocals. My only issue with this song is the absence of an instrumental section, the song is to short. Other then that it is lyrically interesting, emotional and all around well written. (It does have instrumental workouts but they are just soooo short, feeling like transition sections, rather then sections of their own)

Warm Sporran is an instrumental and opens up with funky bass and is soon joined by flute and acoustic guitar with quiet chanting. At first I thought this was going to become a pirate themed crap track but Jethro Tull proved me wrong, this track heads eventually heads into a good flute solo over the bass line, then it stops real quick and starts again, smooth. (reminds me of Peaches En Regalia but a tiny bit worse, still great)

The second side follows the same format, two rockin' songs ballad (Dun Rungill is incredibly dull) a long song (Flying Dutchman=boring) then instrumental. Unfortunately the second side is worse compared to the first side, every track being outdone by its mirror. 3/5 solid album.

 Stormwatch by JETHRO TULL album cover Studio Album, 1979
3.48 | 785 ratings

BUY
Stormwatch
Jethro Tull Prog Folk

Review by prog_traveller!!

3 stars Stormwatch is considered the third and final album in a folk rock trilogy, started by Jethro Tull with previous Songs From The Wood and Heavy Horses. This time, the concept album is built around the theme of the end of the world, almost a kind of premonition of which the group is advocating. The planet has run out of resources, everything around is chaos, a polar bear is preparing to annihilate a refinery while a minstrel. Observes the landscape with binoculars. It almost seems to be faced with a natural continuation of what Jethro had developed with Songs From The Wood but also with Heavy Horses itself. Here, however, the music is ... completely different music.

The folk principles inherent in the band seem to have evaporated in favor of a return of Jethro to the old phase and Stormwatch is much more effervescent. This is demonstrated by the tracks on the album that show how much Anderson & C. are in top form, tracks rich in rhythm, power, well constructed. Sometimes, however, this Stormwatch seems to be monotonous even if in the end it proves quite the opposite; Of course, Jethro's records are not to be listened to every other day, but if listened to or listened again at a suitable distance of time, every time the sensations experienced at the first impact are confirmed and make you forget that monotony we were talking about before. This production is also connected with a sad event that hit the band, namely the death of Glascock, the bassist, who died of an infection, a death that led the English group to separate for a short vacation. Stormwatch shows the first signs of the lack of creativity that has always distinguished the band and Anderson in particular, the lyrics also deal with themes of a "political" nature such as capitalism and the terror of an environmental catastrophe, but despite these incipit the mingling with music at some point it seems to move away. The album is quite obscure and can be understood by listening to the songs that are sometimes nostalgic, sometimes plaintive. The modified sound of Stormwatch, however, maintains the passages that made the band famous and which include lively, intense and at the same time valuable flutes, acoustic melodies with a folk flavor, pleasant prog rock inserts for a mix that makes everything different from previous productions. . Despite the changing contents of the songs, the album is still interesting because it is the projection of one of the dark sides of the leader Anderson. To understand more deeply the passages of this album, a look at some of the pieces contained in it does not hurt: North Sea Oil is started by a beautiful rock more intense than that of the usual Jethro sound, a piece where Ian Anderson's voice seems to remain almost at distance from music; Orion instead uses a variety of sounds in just under four minutes, but is not exempt from rock walks that make the most of Anderson and Evan's folk phrasing; Home is very close to some of the moments contained in Songs From The Wood but it is also strange enough to be an Anderson creation; Warm Sporran, on the other hand, is the first purely instrumental track that actually closes the first side of the record, but lacks that Tullian seal that we all know. With Dun Ringill and Elegy we find instead a use of echo that tends to emphasize the sound produced in favor of a melody also supported by a slight orchestral presence. And it is these two tracks, perhaps, that save the entire album produced. But if this was an album made with Anderson's usual ambitiousness, the result in the end is that of being a record that is the third of the trilogy, a work that actually concludes it but which, unlike the first two, lacks " solidity". The Jethro, to these ups and downs have accustomed the public, external factors and Anderson's ideas are also present here as always, but all this is not enough to always get the desired result.

Unfortunately, the atmosphere that was created in the band due to the health problems of bassist John Glascock who will die on November 17th, weighed on the entire recording of the disc. Despite everything, the signal launched here by the Jethro Tulls is that we must never give up or succumb to the thousand problems that life poses to us every day because trust is always what must guide us, especially that in ourselves. From this point on, it will be a different story for Jethro Tull.

Thanks to ProgLucky for the artist addition. and to Quinino for the last updates

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