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JETHRO TULL

Prog Folk • United Kingdom


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Jethro Tull biography
Founded in Blackpool, UK in 1967 - Hiatus from 2012-2016


"I didn`t have to play it all the time, I just had to wave it around and look good" - Ian Anderson 2003.

Eccentric on stage yet rather thoughtful, reserved and even sombre at times when not in the limelight, the Jethro Tull image was the brainchild of flute wielding frontman Ian ANDERSON. Clad in scruffy vagabond apparel, and looking more like an anachronism out of a Charles Dickens tale, Anderson conveyed an old English aura during the band`s formative years in the late 60`s and early 70`s which would persist throughout the band's 40 year career both visually and musically.

Born on August 10, 1947 in Dunfermline, Fife, Scotland, Anderson was augmented by a revolving door of colourful musicians over the years which added to the flamboyance of the Jethro Tull phenomenon. Conceived as a psychedelic blues band in late 1967 the music of Jethro Tull has always been dauntingly intricate embracing many styles including blues, jazz, folk, medieval, classical, hard rock along with forays into electronic music, sometimes referred to as "space age prog". The lyrics were equally as sophisticated and sometimes reached new heights of grandiloquence commenting on depressing world events such as drug abuse, the oil crisis, modernisation, third world troubles and a deteriorating economy.. Other topics included fads, spy novels, environmental and social issues as well as metaphysical musings. With lyrics and music which ran deep Jethro Tull have often been over-analysed by both fans and critics alike and many of their albums have been erroneously interpreted as autobiographical due to the fact that many of their record covers featured artwork which seemed to depict Ian Anderson's likeness, something which he has vehemently denied in numerous interviews.

Jethro Tull can trace their origins back to 1963 when as a young art student in Blackpool, England Anderson formed a band called THE BLADES (after a club in a James Bond novel). By 1965 as a 7-piece they had changed their name to THE JOHN EVAN BAND and subsequently to THE JOHN EVAN SMASH (his mother supplied their tour van) Evan, whose real name was Evans, would eventually become the band's keyboard player for most of the seventies. The band relocated to London in`67, the centre of the British blues movement of the sixties in search of more lucrative gigs. However the band was gradually d...
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JETHRO TULL discography


Ordered by release date | Showing ratings (top albums) | Help Progarchives.com to complete the discography and add albums

JETHRO TULL top albums (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

3.32 | 858 ratings
This Was
1968
4.04 | 1285 ratings
Stand Up
1969
3.91 | 1073 ratings
Benefit
1970
4.36 | 2697 ratings
Aqualung
1971
4.63 | 3399 ratings
Thick as a Brick
1972
4.03 | 1490 ratings
A Passion Play
1973
3.33 | 854 ratings
War Child
1974
4.03 | 1247 ratings
Minstrel in the Gallery
1975
3.09 | 788 ratings
Too Old To Rock 'n' Roll: Too Young To Die!
1976
4.20 | 1460 ratings
Songs from the Wood
1977
4.04 | 1203 ratings
Heavy Horses
1978
3.48 | 761 ratings
Stormwatch
1979
3.20 | 627 ratings
A
1980
3.28 | 668 ratings
The Broadsword And The Beast
1982
2.24 | 529 ratings
Under Wraps
1984
3.00 | 157 ratings
A Classic Case
1985
3.23 | 589 ratings
Crest Of A Knave
1987
2.69 | 463 ratings
Rock Island
1989
2.60 | 433 ratings
Catfish Rising
1991
3.60 | 520 ratings
Roots To Branches
1995
3.01 | 436 ratings
J-Tull Dot Com
1999
3.49 | 408 ratings
The Jethro Tull Christmas Album
2003

JETHRO TULL Live Albums (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

4.18 | 420 ratings
Live - Bursting Out
1978
2.90 | 53 ratings
Live At Hammersmith '84
1990
3.65 | 175 ratings
A Little Light Music
1992
3.06 | 47 ratings
In Concert
1995
3.65 | 121 ratings
Living With The Past
2002
4.18 | 161 ratings
Nothing Is Easy: Live At The Isle Of Wight 1970
2004
3.46 | 97 ratings
Aqualung Live
2005
3.76 | 88 ratings
Live At Montreux 2003
2007
4.25 | 7 ratings
Live at Madison Square Garden 1978
2009
4.44 | 25 ratings
Live At Carnegie Hall 1970
2015

JETHRO TULL Videos (DVD, Blu-ray, VHS etc)

3.85 | 52 ratings
Slipstream (DVD)
1981
3.81 | 43 ratings
20 Years of Jethro Tull (VHS)
1988
3.47 | 84 ratings
Living With the Past
2002
3.04 | 51 ratings
A New Day Yesterday - The 25th Anniversary Collection
2003
3.87 | 93 ratings
Nothing Is Easy: Live At The Isle Of Wight 1970
2005
2.97 | 68 ratings
Live At Montreux 2003
2007
4.05 | 22 ratings
Slipstream (9 song version)
2007
4.39 | 28 ratings
Classic Artists Series: Jethro Tull
2008
3.31 | 30 ratings
Jack In The Green - Live In Germany
2008
3.64 | 23 ratings
Songs From Bethlehem
2008
4.36 | 103 ratings
Live At Madison Square Garden 1978 (DVD + CD)
2009
3.79 | 34 ratings
Live at AVO Session Basel 2008
2009
4.54 | 35 ratings
Around the World Live (4DVD)
2013

JETHRO TULL Boxset & Compilations (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

3.10 | 2 ratings
Jethro Tull
1970
3.00 | 1 ratings
Sunday Best
1971
4.12 | 322 ratings
Living In The Past
1972
3.02 | 81 ratings
M.U. - The Best of Jethro Tull
1976
2.95 | 55 ratings
Repeat - The Best Of Jethro Tull - Vol. II
1977
1.95 | 2 ratings
The Best Of Jethro Tull Vol. III
1981
3.17 | 78 ratings
Original Masters
1985
2.00 | 1 ratings
Masters of Rock
1986
3.64 | 84 ratings
20 Years Of Jethro Tull Box
1988
4.48 | 85 ratings
20 Years Of Jethro Tull (The Definitive Collection)
1988
3.73 | 53 ratings
20 Years Of Jethro Tull (USA release)
1989
3.64 | 159 ratings
Nightcap
1993
3.82 | 51 ratings
The Best Of Jethro Tull: The Anniversary Collection
1993
4.43 | 79 ratings
25th Anniversary Box Set
1993
2.64 | 27 ratings
A Jethro Tull Collection
1997
1.54 | 31 ratings
Through The Years
1997
3.01 | 71 ratings
The Very Best Of Jethro Tull
2001
2.26 | 15 ratings
Essential Jethro Tull
2007
3.44 | 53 ratings
The Best Of Acoustic Jethro Tull
2007
3.80 | 45 ratings
The Jethro Tull Christmas Album / Live - Christmas At St Bride's 2008
2009
4.71 | 52 ratings
Aqualung - 40th Anniversary Collector's Edition
2011
2.10 | 2 ratings
Essential
2011
4.86 | 78 ratings
Thick As A Brick - 40th Anniversary Special Edition
2012
4.90 | 66 ratings
A Passion Play: An Extended Perfomance
2014
4.67 | 43 ratings
War Child - The 40th Anniversary Theatre Edition
2014
4.87 | 44 ratings
Minstrel In The Gallery - 40th Anniversary: La Grande Edition
2015
4.59 | 22 ratings
Too Old To Rock'n'Roll: Too Young To Die - The TV Special Edition
2015
5.00 | 11 ratings
Stand Up - The Elevated Edition
2016
5.00 | 9 ratings
Aqualung - 40th Anniversary Adapted Edition
2016
2.00 | 1 ratings
An Introduction to Jethro Tull
2017
4.91 | 34 ratings
Songs From The Wood - 40th Anniversary Edition - The Country Set
2017
4.90 | 20 ratings
Heavy Horses (New Shoes Edition)
2018
4.64 | 14 ratings
This Was (50 Anniversary Edition)
2018
3.00 | 5 ratings
50 For 50
2018
1.50 | 2 ratings
50th Anniversary Collection
2018
4.79 | 14 ratings
Stormwatch (The 40th Anniversary Force 10 Edition)
2019

JETHRO TULL Official Singles, EPs, Fan Club & Promo (CD, EP/LP, MC, Digital Media Download)

3.88 | 17 ratings
Love Story
1968
4.13 | 24 ratings
A Song For Jeffrey
1968
2.71 | 18 ratings
Sunshine Day
1968
4.14 | 28 ratings
Sweet Dream / 17
1969
4.14 | 21 ratings
The Witch's Promise
1969
4.60 | 30 ratings
Living In The Past
1969
3.88 | 17 ratings
Inside
1970
4.57 | 37 ratings
Life Is A Long Song
1971
4.21 | 19 ratings
Hymn 43
1971
4.39 | 27 ratings
Aqualung
1971
3.80 | 5 ratings
Locomotive Breath
1971
4.17 | 30 ratings
Living In The Past
1972
3.56 | 25 ratings
Bungle In The Jungle
1974
4.25 | 4 ratings
Skating Away on the Thin Ice of the New Day
1974
3.67 | 3 ratings
Minstrel in the Gallery / Summerday Sands
1975
3.18 | 27 ratings
Ring Out, Solstice Bells
1976
3.33 | 6 ratings
Too Old To Rock 'N' Roll; Too Young To Die
1976
4.19 | 26 ratings
The Whistler
1977
3.50 | 8 ratings
A Stitch In Time
1978
4.07 | 27 ratings
Moths
1978
3.88 | 8 ratings
Warm Sporran
1979
2.68 | 19 ratings
North Sea Oil
1979
4.53 | 19 ratings
Home E.P.
1979
3.22 | 22 ratings
Working John, Working Joe
1980
3.28 | 21 ratings
Fallen On Hard Times
1982
3.40 | 20 ratings
Broadsword
1982
3.05 | 21 ratings
Lap Of Luxury
1984
3.67 | 3 ratings
Bourrée
1985
3.93 | 14 ratings
Coronach
1986
3.79 | 14 ratings
Said She Was A Dancer 12''
1987
3.63 | 16 ratings
Steel Monkey 12''
1987
4.00 | 4 ratings
Part Of The Machine
1988
3.74 | 18 ratings
Another Christmas Song
1989
3.58 | 17 ratings
This Is Not Love
1991
3.84 | 16 ratings
Rocks On The Road
1991
3.00 | 14 ratings
Living in the (Slightly More Recent) Past / Living in the Past
1993
2.71 | 19 ratings
Rare And Precious Chain
1995
3.29 | 17 ratings
Bends Like A Willow
1999
3.20 | 10 ratings
The Christmas EP
2004
4.00 | 3 ratings
Living in the Past
2013

JETHRO TULL Reviews


Showing last 10 reviews only
 Roots To Branches by JETHRO TULL album cover Studio Album, 1995
3.60 | 520 ratings

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Roots To Branches
Jethro Tull Prog Folk

Review by siLLy puPPy
Collaborator PSIKE, JR/F/Canterbury & Eclectic Teams

3 stars Like most of the most popular progressive acts of the 70s who decided to stick around long enough to experience the great 80s identity crisis, JETHRO TULL was less successful in reinventing themselves and created what many regard as a clumsy series of albums that roughly began with the new wave infused "Under Wraps" and well into the 90s with a heavier rock infused style. The band had clearly lost its edge and main man / lead singer / flautist Ian Anderson was clearly chasing the latest trend rather than unleashing the brilliant innovation that had launched the band into the limelight in their earlier years.

After the long run of experiments that didn't exactly set the world on fire, JETHRO TULL returned in 1995 with its 19th studio album ROOTS TO BRANCHES and surprised its fans with an album that went back to its origins, namely progressive folk rock brought to life with Anderson's prominent flute performances and poetic lyrical prose that recounted personal life experiences. In this case ROOTS TO BRANCHES was primarily inspired by Anderson's recent trip to India thus ROOTS TO BRANCHES became what Anderson has referred to as the "Indian Songs From The Wood."

The album featured longtime guitarist Martin Barre but debuted keyboardist Andrew Giddings who contributed rich texturized atmospheres making ROOTS TO BRANCHES a very moody return to form. In addition to the Indian musical influences, Anderson took an interest in Arabic musical flavors and also added touches of jazz. In the case of tracks like "Wounded, Old and Treacherous" Anderson took on a semi-spoken, semi-sung singing style that sounded a bit like folk rapping. The album's overall emphasis on the lighter side of folk rock very much in the vein of late 70s albums such as "Heavy Horses" earned the album the best album that Anderson and friends had cranked out since those days.

Musically ROOTS TO BRANCHES is fairly strong with beautiful folk melodies decorated with knotty guitar work, Eastern tinged exotica and Anderson's signature flute sound. The keyboards are primarily atmospheric but piano rolls punctuate the percussion rich motifs and the consistency of 70s TULL classics is back in full-swing. Unfortunately ROOTS TO BRANCHES comes off as weak in the vocal department as Anderson's fiery spirit had been somewhat extinguished by this point and his ability to hit the higher octave range seems to have been a thing of the past. All in all the album is pleasant but for a diehard TULL fan played entirely too safe.

As a diehard TULL fan myself, i find every studio album sitting on my shelf and although these later albums are not bad in any way, they lack the brilliant dynamism that permeated the band's canon from the debut "This Was" up until the experimental and oft misunderstood 1980 release "A." For those longing for a return to form, ROOTS TO BRANCHES certainly provided that long anticipated return to the past but as far as the shining brilliance that graced the 70s output, ROOTS TO BRANCHES seems like a half-hearted attempt at recapturing those anachronistic visions. Make no doubt about it, certain tracks like "At Last Forever" clearly evoke the great TULL of the past but for the most part Anderson sounds as if he is struggling to hit the proper notes therefore this is a decent album indeed that fails to rise to the quality of its heyday.

 20 Years Of Jethro Tull (The Definitive Collection) by JETHRO TULL album cover Boxset/Compilation, 1988
4.48 | 85 ratings

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20 Years Of Jethro Tull (The Definitive Collection)
Jethro Tull Prog Folk

Review by TCat
Special Collaborator Eclectic / Prog Metal / Heavy Prog Team

4 stars I found this going through a huge collection of used vinyl in a 2nd hand store, and just had to have it especially since it is somewhat rare nowadays and because the shop had it priced rather cheap even though it was in excellent shape. This collection is a treasure trove of great, yet mostly rare, Tull tracks that were recorded through the years, from their humble beginnings when they were mistakenly credited as "Jethro Toe" on their first single (both the A side and B side are here), to BBC and live sessions, to non-album b-sides and EP tracks, collected all together in one amazing collection. The set is not ordered in chronological order, but a bit randomly, but the music seems to flow quite well from one track to another.

The LP version of this box set it set up a little different than the CD version, though all of the tracks are there (65 in total), mostly in the same order, but with some interesting track order changes. With the CD version, there are 3 loaded discs, but on the LP version there are 5 discs, named (categorized) in this manner:

Disc 1: The Radio Archives Disc 2: The Rare Tracks (Released But Only Just) Disc 3: Flawed Gems (Dusted Down) Disc 4: The Other Sides of Tull Disc 5: The Essential Tull

This all comes together with a 24-page book that has some excellent photos, artwork, a write up from Ian Anderson, details on a track-by-track basis, and a lot of commentary and history.

For a Tull fan, this box set is a definite treasure as it is also for a vinyl collector. But, I think even casual Tull fans will find plenty to love here. But it does require a bit of knowledge about the history of the band to make the best sense out of some of these tracks, and the book provides this. The sound is excellent, even on the earliest and also the live tracks. All around, this is an excellent collection, to be sure. Once you hear these tracks and become familiar with them, many will become classic and essential tracks for you. It's true a few might be throw aways, but for the most part, this is worth searching for, whether it's on CD or LP.

 Living In The Past  by JETHRO TULL album cover Boxset/Compilation, 1972
4.12 | 322 ratings

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Living In The Past
Jethro Tull Prog Folk

Review by Uruk_hai

4 stars Review # 72

"Living in the past" is a compilation of JETHRO TULL's singles from 1968 to 1972, most of these singles didn't make part of any of the studio albums of the band and that gives it a very original profile.

The CD that I own in my collection has a slightly different track-list than the one that is registered in this website but that doesn't change too much my opinion about the album: this album is great since most of the songs that it contains (obviously similar to the ones that appear in their first three albums) truly deserved to become part of a long playing record.

Songs as "Christmas song", "Sweet dream", Singing all day", "Witches promise" and of course the title track "Living in the past" have become favorites in several concerts of the band along the years. The live performances "Be my kind permission of" and "Dharma for one" that occupied a whole of the four sides of the LP set captured the essence of the band on stage (something that would be later extended in several posthumously published live albums).

Most of the songs of this album were recorded on the same days of "This was", "Stand up" and "Benefit"; I ranked all of those albums with four stars so it is only fair that this album gets the same rate, no more, no less.

 Nothing Is Easy: Live At The Isle Of Wight 1970 by JETHRO TULL album cover Live, 2004
4.18 | 161 ratings

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Nothing Is Easy: Live At The Isle Of Wight 1970
Jethro Tull Prog Folk

Review by Uruk_hai

5 stars Review #71

Absolutely mind-blowing!!!

One time I was talking with a friend of mine about the Monterey, Woodstock and Isle of Wight festivals and he asked me that if I could go back in time which one of those three concerts I would attend to, I said something like "are you kidding me? JETHRO TULL played at the Isle of Wight, I wouldn't go anywhere else".

Among several artists of the size of CHICAGO, PROCOL HARUM, THE MOODY BLUES, CACTUS, JIMI HENDRIX, MILES DAVIS, THE DOORS, FAMILY, TEN YEARS AFTER, DONOVAN, EMERSON, LAKE & PALMER, SLY & THE FAMILY STONE, JOAN BAEZ, LEONARD COHEN, THE WHO, JONI MITCHELL, the Brazilian Bossa Nova singers GILBERTO GIL & CAETANO VELOSO and many, many others, JETHRO TULL gave an amazing performance in the isle featuring songs from their first three albums and the premiere of "My God".

The line-up of ANDERSON, CORNICK, BARRE, BUNKER and EVAN was in its better days: you can almost touch the energy in the air when you play this record. The performance is very energetic as they used to be back in good 1970; it's not that they were competing with anyone, that was the beauty of the hippie era of music: the bands didn't play music to compete against each other, but for playing in the same festival that a band of the caliber of let's say TEN YEARS AFTER, they HAD to be extremely energetic on stage so they will be well received by the audience.

The concert starts with "My Sunday feeling", which is the first song of the first album. I must admit that this is my favorite song in all JETHRO TULL's discography. ANDERSON gives a little introduction before the song starts in which he explains that Martin BARRE had listen to the original album in which Mick ABRAHAMS was the guitarist and he was going to play it. During the little speech we can hear BUNKER, BARRE and CORNICK tuning their instruments. The live version is considerably stronger than the studio version.

The performance of "My God" (which was a song later included in their legendary "Aqualung" album) sounds mind-blowingly intense; it's not that Jeffrey HAMMOND is a bad bass player, but the work made in this version by Glenn CORNICK is astonishing.

The version of "Dharma for one" is great too: the band added lyrics to this originally instrumental song (along with the addition of EVAN's organ lines) and the drum solo by BUNKER was really well captured in the recording. The performances of songs from the "Stand up" and "Benefit" albums such as "Bouree", "Nothing is easy" and the immortal "With you there to help me" present an undeniable high level of improvisation. Man! I wish I was there in the audience!

This is how a live album should sound like.

 Live - Bursting Out by JETHRO TULL album cover Live, 1978
4.18 | 420 ratings

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Live - Bursting Out
Jethro Tull Prog Folk

Review by Uruk_hai

3 stars Review #70

"Bursting out" was JETHRO TULL's first live album which was both recorded and released in 1978 in several European cities while the Heavy horses tour (interestingly there are no songs from the "Heavy horses" album in this record. The album features songs from the "Aqualung", "Thick as a brick", "Minstrel in the gallery", "Too old to rock and roll" and "Songs from the wood" albums but frankly, the performances have almost any interesting change from the studio versions.

When I wrote my review about PINK FLOYD's "Is there anybody out there?" I explained that I rarely enjoy live albums since most of the time I found them very little original when they play the songs almost exactly as the studio versions and this album is not an exception: further than the heavy guitar riff in "Sweet dreams" there is not too much improvisation and jamming in this album. I'd rather listen to the studio albums before this one.

Not a bad album though, just nothing original in it.

 Stormwatch by JETHRO TULL album cover Studio Album, 1979
3.48 | 761 ratings

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Stormwatch
Jethro Tull Prog Folk

Review by Uruk_hai

3 stars Review #69

This will be the last JETHRO TULL studio album that I write a review about, that is because I've never heard any of the following albums and I have almost no interest in listening to any of them: that is in part because of all the bad reviews that I've been reading about albums such as 'A', 'The broadsword and the beast', 'Under wraps' and 'Crest of a knave' (I do have an immense curiosity to listen to this last one though because of the METALLICA anecdote) but it also has a lot to do with my view of the 'Stormwatch' album.

I already explained in my last two reviews that I needed to listen to both 'Songs from the wood' and 'Heavy horses' several times before I fell in love with them and probably that is also what I need with 'Stormwatch', but as far as I've been listening to it I feel that is the same deal as happened with 'War child': it was an album with a total lack of inspiration and they only recorded it so they had something to publish that year.

The songs in here are not catchy and it is easy to get bored if you listen to it as a whole piece (if you listen to the songs separately they could seem nice). Yes, it has a lot of flute lines, piano, bass, guitar and all the stuff that I love about the previous albums, the six-men band of ANDERSON, PALMER, BARRE, BARLOW, EVAN and GLASCOCK is the same line-up that played 'Stormwatch' (which, by the way, disappeared after this album since GLASCOCK died and all EVAN, BARLOW and PALMER left the band leaving it only to ANDERSON and BARRE so after this the band started to recruit several passing musicians) but it just doesn't convince me.

Maybe I need to listen to this album several more times and maybe someday I could appreciate it in another level and if it happens I'll be happy to edit my review and change my rate, but right now I feel that this material deserves only three stars.

 Heavy Horses by JETHRO TULL album cover Studio Album, 1978
4.04 | 1203 ratings

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Heavy Horses
Jethro Tull Prog Folk

Review by Uruk_hai

5 stars Review #68

The new JT style that emerged in "Songs from the wood" remained in the following album but don't get me wrong: this is a very original album. "Heavy horses" was the second album of the six-men line-up of JETHRO TULL including David PALMER and such as the previous album, this was a record that I needed to listen to several times before I appreciate its uniqueness.

ANDERSON played some of his best flute lines in this album while BARRE showed a maturity as a musician that links up really well to any rhythm that appears in the songs. The string arrangements, the interesting lyrics, the hard rock tunes mixed with sweet flute passages (something that has always been the most recognizable characteristic in JT's music but it is also something that never gets annoying but keeps improving over time) are the most remarkable characteristics in this album.

1.- "?and the mouse police never sleeps" (03:12): What an opening! The folky acoustic guitar, the powerful bass line, the chorus by GLASCOCK? the song is aggressive and fresh. The little stops that the song takes every time it's going to repeat the patron keeps the song really interesting. This song reminds me a lot to COMUS' "First utterance" (only without the violins).

2.- Acres wild (03:24): The mandolin and the violin are the main instruments in this rocky piece with sensual organs here and there.

3.- No lullaby (07:55): One of the hardest songs of the album: more presence of the electric guitar drums, organ and bass, at some times it reminds me a lot to YES early albums (that obviously changes when ANDRESON's vocals and flute appear).

4.- Moths (03:28): My favorite song of the album. The melody is absolutely beautiful: the flute and the discrete orchestral arrangements by PALMER come and go through the song and it is just lovely. At some moments I feel as I was listening to THE CARPENTERS (who I adore) only that the voice of Karen is replaced by Ian's? Anyway, I really think I've heard a cover of this piece or a really similar song, only that I don't remember when or where.

5.- Journeyman (03:58) This song reminds me a lot to GENTLE GIANT's "Cogs in cogs", especially the bass and keyboard lines.

6.- Rover (04:17): The marimbas played by BARLOW in this piece give it a very unique touch; the rhythm is rocky but not too fast.

7.- One brown mouse (03:23): Another rock piece with more presence of acoustic than electric guitar.

8.- Heavy horses (08:55): The title track is also the longest song of the album: the piano and the violins in the beginning and the powerful rock structure predominant in the song made of this a very essential jewel in the JT's discography.

9.- Weathercock (04:07): An excellent closing track for an excellent album! The last piece is also very strong rock with nice acoustic arrangements from time to time; very intense most of the time.

Probably the last masterpiece in JETHRO TULL's discography since "Stormwatch" was not that great and I haven't heard any of their 80's or 90's albums but for what I've seen were not very well received by the fans.

This is an indispensable material.

 Songs from the Wood by JETHRO TULL album cover Studio Album, 1977
4.20 | 1460 ratings

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Songs from the Wood
Jethro Tull Prog Folk

Review by Uruk_hai

5 stars Review #67

I must recognize that I had to listen to this album A LOOOOOOOT of times before I really started to appreciate it.

After three frankly not very amazing albums JT published "Songs from the wood" in 1977 and it was like the awakening of a sleeping giant. The sound of the album is fresh and original, very eclectic and with a lot of great songs with the most diverse catalogue of rhythms that go from the acoustic soft sections to very hard rock ones passing through even some really good jazzy moments and the classic folky style that always characterized the band.

The six musicians (David PALMER finally became an official member of the band but this time accompanying John EVAN in piano and synthesizers instead of directing chord arrangements as he did in "Minstrel in the gallery") played in this album as if they just had come back from a really revitalizing vacation and with all the batteries charged. All the instruments (acoustic guitar, electric guitar, drums, bass, piano, flute and mandolin) had the chance to shine beautifully at least one time along the record.

1.- Songs from the wood (04:53): The first time that I heard this song was in the radio: a local station in Oaxaca City that occasionally plays very interesting music from around the globe started to play this song and I totally recognized ANDRESON's vocals and flute, two or three days later I listened to the entire album for the very first time. It starts with ANDERSON singing a cappella followed by the chorus of GLASCOCK, then the acoustic guitar, flute and soft percussions start giving the structure to the song; finally the guitar, organ and drums enter. The song evolves from a merely vocal piece to a great rock piece.

2.- Jack-in-the-green (02:28): This is a more relaxed melody that doesn't feature drums, but only really light percussions; acoustic guitar, bass, piano and of course ANDERSON's flute jam beautifully through this piece.

3.- Cup of wonder (04:32): Rockier than the previous song but yet really soft and enjoyable; the cow bell marking the tempo is delightful.

4.- Hunting girl (05:11): The powerful riff in this song and the snare drums made from this maybe the less folky and more intense rock piece of the album; the undeniable touch of the organ and the strong bass lines by GLASCOCK make this song sound almost as a Proto-Metal: I wouldn't be surprised to hear that bands in the style of IRON MAIDEN took some inspiration from this piece.

5.- Ring out, solstice bells (03:44): This song is filled with joyful vocals and clapping hands; the organ and the acoustic guitar are so harmonic and the really short but yet really precise jazzy piano section in the middle are amazing. The bells at the end were an obvious addition to this song.

6.- Velvet green (06:02): The renaissance arrangement at the first part of this song is beautiful.

7.- The whistler (03:31): The main instrument in this song is the acoustic guitar played by ANDERSON, the rhythm is moved and enjoyable.

8.- Pibroch (cap in hand) (08:33): Martin BARRE made an excellent job with the electric guitar introduction to this piece; the song reminds a lot to JT's early albums (especially "Benefit").

9.- Fire at midnight (02:27): The last piece of the album has a predominant organ in the beginning, until the snare drums and the chord instruments (guitar and bass) enter. The song switches to a more rocky rhythm with flute and electric guitar.

Every song in this album is great: very fresh and original tunes that had become classics in JT's repertoire.

 Too Old To Rock 'n' Roll: Too Young To Die! by JETHRO TULL album cover Studio Album, 1976
3.09 | 788 ratings

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Too Old To Rock 'n' Roll: Too Young To Die!
Jethro Tull Prog Folk

Review by Uruk_hai

2 stars Review #66

"Too old to rock 'n' roll" is probably the less interesting album of JT in the seventies; yes, it has nice flute arrangements and the vocals of the new bass player John GLASCOCK (ex-CARMEN bassist who was replacing Jeffrey HAMMOND) were a nice accompaniment to ANDERSON's vocals, but the music in this album falls into a really boring and repetitive sound.

It's not that this is a bad record: it's just that it doesn't have almost anything slightly similar to any of the previous albums of the band. The songs in here are extremely monotonous and it is hard to appreciate what JETHRO TULL was doing, it almost sound as a BOB DYLAN album but not one of the good ones: one of the really boring ones from the late seventies.

This is an album that I listen maybe one time every two or three years just to remember what the music was like. If you haven't heard any JT album don't start here: this is only for very devoted fans of the band.

Maybe I'm just too young to enjoy it.

 Minstrel in the Gallery by JETHRO TULL album cover Studio Album, 1975
4.03 | 1247 ratings

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Minstrel in the Gallery
Jethro Tull Prog Folk

Review by Uruk_hai

4 stars Review #65

One of the most interesting albums of JETHRO TULL after "Thick as a brick" was definitely "Minstrel in the gallery".

This was an album that took JT's music to an almost symphonic sound since they could perfectly mix the beautiful short acoustic melodies and the long hard rock songs in the vein of "Aqualung" with the nice touch of the chord quintet in the background giving this album a very unique touch; however, the atmosphere in this album feels kind of dry, even when it has very original songs with nice guitar riffs and the nice violins and stuff, there is a lack of enthusiasm in the recordings: it feels like the band was really tired for playing very intense and experimental long instrumental passages and now they only wanted to play very easy-playing songs with very predictable riffs and much less punching drums. The album is not amazing but it is not bad either.

Songs like "Minstrel in the gallery", "Cold wind to Valhalla" and "Black satin dancer" are more oriented to a hard rock style similar to the "Aqualung" style while "Requiem", "One white duck" and "Grace" are completely acoustic and very soft; the main act of the album is the 16 minutes suite "Baker Street Muse" that changes from acoustic to hard rock from time to time.

Ian ANDERSON left the saxophones behind and returned to the classic flute as his main instrument so that reminds a little to the days before "A passion play" while EVAN, BARRE, BARLOW and HAMMOND kept playing the instruments that gave JT the rock essence of the band. "Cold wind to Valhalla" and "Baker Street Muse" are probably the most popular songs that came from this album.

Even when this album is not one of the best ones in JT's catalogue, the band demonstrated once again how versatile they were and how their sound could change from one album to another without losing their well- known style.

Thanks to ProgLucky for the artist addition. and to Quinino for the last updates

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