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THE SILENT SUN / THAT'S ME

Genesis

Symphonic Prog


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Guillermo
PROG REVIEWER
3 stars Genesis`first single, released in February 1968.

The songs of this and their next single ("A Winter`s Tale"/ One-Eyed Hound") were released for the first time in a L.P called "Rock Roots: Genesis" (Decca Records ROOTS 1), in the same Mono versions s when they were released as singles. As I have this L.P., which I bought in late 1981, I can write reviews about them.

"The Silent Sun", which also appeared in the "From Genesis to Revelation" album in the Mono and Stereo versions, is a very good song, a ballad with acoustic guitars and piano, with a very good orchestral arrangement done by Arthur Greenslade. I still think that there are some differences with the album version, at least in the duration of the song (2:15 minutes the single version, 2:07 minutes the album version). Some people say that both are the same version with Chris Stewart on drums, but I still think that they are different, not only in the mixing. Maybe the single version is a bit slow than the album version, but the version included in the Stereo version of the L.P. is better due to the Stereo mix, which adds some "atmosphere" to the song.

"That`s Me" is, IMO, a very representative example of a song written by teenagers, still looking for an "adult identity", and maybe, for a "band identity". It has a lead guitar well played by Anthony Phillips, plus acoustic guitar and piano. Drummer Chris Stewart was good too.

This was a good single, which, maybe with more adecuate publicity and promotion, could have been successful. Unfortunately, their producer, IMO, didn`t have then enough vision to promote the band better.

Both songs are obviously not very "Progressive" in style, as the style of the band was still in development.

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Send comments to Guillermo (BETA) | Report this review (#74078)
Posted Tuesday, April 04, 2006 | Review Permalink
3 stars HI, for teenagers of 17 years old, the song are very good!

The silent sun: 8/10 --> First, the sound it's very good for '68. The song begin with piano, very cool intro, and peter gabriel voice start. His voice is very beautiful. Later in the song, there are violon add by Jonathan King I think and it's very beautiful.

That's me: 7/10 --> The song begin with the Gabriel' voice who is again beautiful. This song is less good than the silent sun because the sound of the electric guitar (ant phillips) is very annoying. But is good due too is melodie.

--> Good <--

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Send comments to majitronic (BETA) | Report this review (#87166)
Posted Sunday, August 13, 2006 | Review Permalink
2 stars I obtained a copy of this way back around the time of the foxtrot tour. What we have is a competent but hardly surprising 60's pop single by some kids calling themselves Genesis. Most of you will know what this sounds like from the later versions of the Genesis to revelation record which has been re-released under several different names. There really is nothing here that hints at the greatness to come such a relatively short time later. "The Silent sun" is nothing special, but" That's me" has a different and slightly disturbing lyric about not fitting in. This single is now considered quite a collectors piece but like most rare singles its rarity is due to small sales which in the case is due to the rather ordinary nature of the songs presented. I would not recommend shelling out the large fee it now costs to acquire this record , but then I'm not selling mine either !

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Send comments to burgersoft777 (BETA) | Report this review (#92250)
Posted Wednesday, September 27, 2006 | Review Permalink
Finnforest
SPECIAL COLLABORATOR
Honorary Collaborator
1 stars "The Silent Sun" is one of the lamest tracks on the Genesis debut, pure pop drivel with heavy strings adding nothing but cheesiness. Sounding like a Spinal Tap "Flower People" parody the track offers up the most sappy, pleading "baby baby" chorus. Flip side "That's Me" certainly doesn't save it although it does rock a bit more and features a nice, sloppy little guitar solo and a certain Stones inspired coolness. Completely forgettable material for completists only, unless you can hear it as bonus tracks on some "Revelation" CD issues. The debut album has plenty of period charm but virtually none was apparent on this single.

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Send comments to Finnforest (BETA) | Report this review (#261804)
Posted Wednesday, January 20, 2010 | Review Permalink
4 stars THE SILENT SUN and the b-side THAT'S ME were written in 1967, but were only released in february next year.

It is no use to compare them to the band's 70's Progressive Rock stuff or to the band's 80's Pop/Synth-Pop stuff, because in 1967 neither Progressive Rock nor Synth-Pop existed. So the music must be listened to within the context of its era. If we are going to compare it, then it has to be within the context it was created, along with its contemporaries. So don't expect Supper's Ready nor Mamma.

For example: THE SILENT SUN and THAT'S ME are in sync with the first Pink Floyd album (The Piper At The Gates Of Dawn) or the first pre-King Crimson album (The Cheerful Insanity Of Giles, Giles & Fripp) or the first album by Keith Emerson's The Nice (The Thoughts of Emerlist Davjack).

THE SILENT SUN is the very first thing GENESIS has ever recorded. It's a lightweight radio- friendly love-ballad with a lush orchestration done by ace arranger Arthur Greenslade (now deceased). But in this 45 RPM, the real gem is the b-side.

THAT'S ME sounds like an early 60's rock'n'roll song made by the British invasion bands.. but with psychedelic tones. Just to give an idea, THAT'S ME is halfway between "Please Please Me" and "Taxman". It is a strong and moving rock track which sounds very English and which only the late 60's could produce. Anthony Phillips delivers an outstanding guitar solo while the rest of the band contributes with an atmospheric soft choir of "aaaahhhhhs" against Peter Gabriel's lead vocal. Even at that initial stage, their talent was overflowing.

The CD editions of FROM GENESIS TO REVELATION include both songs.

As a 60's music fan, I regret that the production values, the instrumentation and the SOUND of 60's recordings were never repeated in the following decades. This SOUND is exclusive from this era (although the 70's sound great too).

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Send comments to JBDESOUZA (BETA) | Report this review (#727090)
Posted Saturday, April 14, 2012 | Review Permalink
4 stars THE SILENT SUN and THAT'S ME were written in 1967.

This year was a crucial turning point in the sixties. Before 1967 rock was simpler, naive, accessible, radio and dance oriented.... but in 1967 (thanks to the Beatles/George Martin's Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band) rock began to incorporate other 'sounds' like, for instance, music from India, jazz, folk, etc.... but primarily: classical music. Different styles were absorbed and thrown into an imaginary blender: the end result was a new type of rock that became known as psychedelic rock.

British psychedelia toyed with orchestras, sometimes using very big ones to create very little sounds. The new generation of groups messed with noises, sound effects, voices, reversed tapes, long improvised guitar solos, reversed guitar solos, free form music, reverberation, delays and a multitude of other stereo effects. The recording studio became an instrument itself. The sound of the electric guitars was distorted with feedback and with the (then) recently created fuzz boxes. Before 1967 the instruments used by the British invasion bands were guitars, bass and drums. After 1967 the use of unusual instrumentation became the norm: sitar, tabla (plus other Indian instruments), electric organ, violin, violoncello, flute, harpsichord, oboe, harp, strings, brass, etc.... Musicians were fuelled by LSD, so their music had to sound like a drug experience too.

Suddenly classical music (once the cheesy sound of our parents - the (then) mocked older generation) was now hip and an integral part of UK's new rock. The Beatles had already given the signal in 1965 with their hit 'Yesterday': instead of guitars, there was a string quartet playing the classical flavored arrangement written by George Martin. Even the dirty Rolling Stones joined with a similar treatment for 'As Tears Go By'.

Before 1967 rock was the cry from the streets. Now a lot of middle-class kids who had studied in good schools, who had studied music and knew the classics were able to apply them to rock and roll. In 1967 the standards of British rock were raised, the frontiers were broaden. British psychedelia gave birth to bands led by kids who were highly trained and were able to play very well their instruments: Keith Emerson (The Nice ' later ELP), Hugh Banton (Van Der Graaf), Tony Banks and Anthony Phillips (Genesis), Robert Fripp (Giles, Giles & Fripp - later King Crimson), Rick Wakeman, etc.... Groups which had classical or avant-garde leanings appeared (Moody Blues, Procol Harum, Pink Floyd, amongst others).

On the other side of the Atlantic, USA was also immersed in psychedelia, but their hippie- acid-rock was more crude and raw than its English counterpart: each country tended to lean towards its roots. In the case of American rock, it was Blues or Country. But these 2 styles were not a tradition in UK, so while American rock leaned towards them, English rock leaned towards classical music. It was their past, their European musical origin.

In 1967 it seemed that rock had reached its highest creative point.... But no: gradually it continued to evolve and within a year or two it had morphed into an even more complex type of music, which came to be known as Progressive Rock. But its seeds were sown in 1967.

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Send comments to RINLEW (BETA) | Report this review (#730086)
Posted Monday, April 16, 2012 | Review Permalink

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