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A GOTHIC LOVE SONG

Current 93

Prog Folk


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Current 93 A Gothic Love Song album cover
3.12 | 6 ratings | 1 reviews | 0% 5 stars

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Singles/EPs/Fan Club/Promo, released in 1998

Songs / Tracks Listing

1. A Gothic Love Song (6:03)
2. Moon: Page 209, Twenty Two Eighteen Now (9:18)

Total Time 15:21

Line-up / Musicians

- David Tibet / vocals, drone
- Maja Elliott / piano
- Christoph Heemann / second piano, drone
- Michael Cashmore / third piano, drone
- Steven Stapleton / drone

Releases information

CD Durtro DURTRO040CD (1998) UK

Thanks to clemofnazareth for the addition
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CURRENT 93 A Gothic Love Song ratings distribution


3.12
(6 ratings)
Essential: a masterpiece of progressive rock music(0%)
0%
Excellent addition to any prog rock music collection(67%)
67%
Good, but non-essential (17%)
17%
Collectors/fans only (17%)
17%
Poor. Only for completionists (0%)
0%

CURRENT 93 A Gothic Love Song reviews


Showing all collaborators reviews and last reviews preview | Show all reviews/ratings

Collaborators/Experts Reviews

Review by TCat
SPECIAL COLLABORATOR Honorary Collaborator / Retired Admin
3 stars This single from Current 93 is an interesting one especially when trying to give it a fair rating. The A side is the title track and is one of the most lovely songs of the project's history. The song starts off with a nice drone-ish introduction which gives some depth to the track by varying tones. Soon, the track falls into a solo piano and David Tibet's signature "songspeak" style, but throughout, he remains pensive and restrained making for a perfect track that should have attracted a lot more attention than it did. It's a perfect track.

Unfortunately, the B side doesn't really fit the A side very well. "Moon: Page 209, Twenty Two Eighteen Now" is an odd choice to back up this single. It is a nearly 10 minute drone that never changes it's note. The thing that does change in this track is the dynamic and the layers. Apparently, the drone is produced by 4 mystery instruments, but it sounds live a string quartet as the layers are added in slowly in a constant flow. There is a pulsating texture to it all, and the lower tone (cello sounding), which comes in quietly below the other tones eventually almost obliterates the other layers before it calms down and fades away while the other tones continue to build and begin pulsating faster and faster until the end. It's interesting, but not something that fits the beauty of the other track and is probably more effective placed with other experimental tracks, but seeming out of place here.

It would be easy just to say this one is only good for collectors and fans, but the title track is just too good to be ignored. The track can be found on the album, however, it is unfortunately shortened as the introductory section is left off and it doesn't stand out as well as it does here. So, it kind of makes this single much more necessary. So, in the end, I will split the difference and will give it 3 stars. But, be warned, if you are not the type to sit through a single-note drone, you will probably only find yourself playing the A side.

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